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Marrying tissue engineering with systems biology - MIT News Office

Marrying tissue engineering with systems biology - MIT News Office | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Linda Griffith combines in vitro models with deep molecular analysis to accelerate drug discovery.
Sharrock's insight:

This amazes me: “All the blood in your intestine immediately goes to the liver, which regulates your metabolism, but your gut’s also filled with microbes, and little pieces of microbes leak across the gut wall all the time and interact with the immune system in the liver,” she explains. “If you get a gastrointestinal disease or take a drug that changes the gut permeability, now all of a sudden the liver can see a lot more bacterial products than it’s used to, and it can get inflamed. That may be okay, but if you’re taking a drug or you have some kind of stress, you may harm your liver.”

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33rd Square: Breakthrough May Lead To Alzheimer's Vaccine

33rd Square: Breakthrough May Lead To Alzheimer's Vaccine | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A team of scientists from Université Laval, CHU de Québec, and pharmaceutical firm GlaxoSmithKline has discovered a way to stimulate the brain's natural defense mechanisms in people with Alzheimer's disease.
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Liangfang Zhang | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review

Liangfang Zhang | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A nanoengineering scheme to make drugs more effective by fooling the immune system.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "Zhang derives red-blood-cell membranes from blood samples and uses them to coat polymer nanoparticles. Because these particles look like red blood cells on the surface, they can fool the immune system; loaded with drugs, they serve as robust and long-lived drug carriers. An unexpected bonus: they can also act like nanoscale sponges to suck up toxic proteins produced by infectious bacteria or introduced by snake or insect venom. If the particles flood the bloodstream, they will divert most of the toxin away from actual cells."

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