Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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The bitcoin industry embraces what it was built to avoid—rules and regulation

The bitcoin industry embraces what it was built to avoid—rules and regulation | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Bitcoin was designed to be unregulated by any government or central authority. But according to some of the cryptocurrency's biggest supporters, the crash of the prominent bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox is the latest sign that bitcoin needs to adopt some sort of oversight if it is going to survive and thrive. "I think regulation is a must at this...
Sharrock's insight:

When regulation takes hold, after this Mt.Gox fiasco, this will be my "go to" for certain quasi-political discussions. 

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Where Money Hides: Tax Havens and Offshore Accounts

Where Money Hides: Tax Havens and Offshore Accounts | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
U.S. Treasury cracks down on offshore accounts, forcing foreign countries to divulge U.S. taxpayer account information.
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NTSB Pushes for Vehicle-To-Vehicle Communication Systems: How Long Until They Appear?

NTSB Pushes for Vehicle-To-Vehicle Communication Systems: How Long Until They Appear? | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
We've spilled a lot of virtual ink over vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-grid communications.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article:

 

"the basic technology behind V2V and V2G systems already exists, and it could theoretically be scaled up fairly quickly. There are, however, at least three hurdles to overcome:bandwidth, money, and the law:


By "bandwidth", we don't mean the speed of the networks carrying and analyzing all this new data (though that could be a major concern in some areas). Instead, we mean the ability of corporations and governments to develop and install the devices, and subsequently, assess the findings.

 

This would likely be easier for car companies, who would simply need to place electronic beacons on vehicles. It could be much harder for cash-strapped municipalities to install cameras at every intersection. And of course, for every car or signal light without those devices, the systems become slightly less effective.

 

Then there's the question of money. The new technology would likely keep motorists safer on the roads, but how much would new-car buyers be willing to shell out for it? How would cities pay for all the devices used to monitor traffic? 

 

Legal hurdles are even more complicated. As with autonomous cars (in which V2V and V2G technology will play a major role), there's the question of fault to consider. If accidents happen after the systems debut -- as they surely will -- who's at fault? The drivers? The automaker? The device manufacturer? The entity that monitors the network? And who's responsible for maintaining that network anyway?"

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