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A 3-D Printing Breakthrough: Jennifer Lewis at Harvard 3-D Prints Biological Tissue | MIT Technology Review

A 3-D Printing Breakthrough: Jennifer Lewis at Harvard 3-D Prints Biological Tissue | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Inks made from different types of materials, precisely applied, are greatly expanding the kinds of things that can be printed.

 

Last year, Lewis and her students showed they could print the microscopic electrodes and other components needed for tiny lithium-ion batteries (see “Printing Batteries”). Other projects include printed sensors fabricated on plastic patches that athletes could one day wear to detect concussions and measure violent impacts. Most recently, her group printed biological tissue interwoven with a complex network of blood vessels. To do this, the researchers had to make inks out of various types of cells and the materials that form the matrix supporting them. The work addresses one of the lingering challenges in creating artificial organs for drug testing or, someday, for use as replacement parts: how to create a vascular system to keep the cells alive.

 

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A new look at high-temperature superconductors - MIT News Office

A new look at high-temperature superconductors - MIT News Office | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

MIT researchers' new method for observing the motion of electron density waves in a superconducting material led to the detection of two different kinds of variations in those waves: amplitude (or intensity) changes and phase changes, shifting the relative positions of peaks and troughs of intensity. These new findings could make it easier to search for new kinds of higher-temperature superconductors.

 While the phenomenon of superconductivity — in which some materials lose all resistance to electric currents at extremely low temperatures — has been known for more than a century, the temperature at which it occurs has remained too low for any practical applications. The discovery of “high-temperature” superconductors in the 1980s — materials that could lose resistance at temperatures of up to negative 140 degrees Celsius — led to speculation that a surge of new discoveries might quickly lead to room-temperature superconductors. Despite intense research, these materials have remained poorly understood.


There is still no agreement on a single theory to account for high-temperature superconductivity. Recently, however, researchers at MIT and elsewhere have found a new way to study fluctuating charge-density waves, which are the basis for one of the leading theories. The researchers say this could open the door to a better understanding of high-temperature superconductivity, and perhaps prompt new discoveries of higher-temperature superconductors.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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This shows MIT researchers' new method for observing the motion of electron density waves in a superconducting material which led to the detection of two different kinds of variations in those waves: amplitude changes and phase changes, shifting the relative positions of peaks and troughs of intensity. These new findings could make it easier to search for new kinds of higher-temperature superconductors.

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David Deutsch – On Artificial Intelligence

David Deutsch – On Artificial Intelligence | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The very laws of physics imply that artificial intelligence must be possible. What's holding us up?
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