Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Lawyers Won’t Lose Clients to DIY Legal Services

Lawyers Won’t Lose Clients to DIY Legal Services | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
People who want to do their own legal work are, naturally, not likely to hire a lawyer in the first place. And people who hire lawyers do not want to do their own legal work.
Sharrock's insight:

Every few weeks, I find an article promising that some kind of technology will replace the human employee--teacher, accountant, etc. This article explains why lawyers will not probably be replaced. For some of the same reasons, teachers will also never be replaced...at least, not for a very long time.

 

excerpt: "Currently, consumers can pick from a range of options for do-it-yourself legal services. You can get a divorce at OfficeMax, a will from Amazon, and dissolve a partnership with LegalZoom. Those are just a few examples, of course. There are hundreds of DIY legal documents available online and offline."

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Sharrock's curator insight, August 29, 2014 11:29 AM

Every few weeks, I find an article promising that some kind of technology will replace the human employee--teacher, accountant, etc. This article explains why lawyers will not probably be replaced. For some of the same reasons, teachers will also never be replaced...at least, not for a very long time.

 

excerpt: "Currently, consumers can pick from a range of options for do-it-yourself legal services. You can get a divorce at OfficeMax, a will from Amazon, and dissolve a partnership with LegalZoom. Those are just a few examples, of course. There are hundreds of DIY legal documents available online and offline."

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Laws and Ethics Can’t Keep Pace with Technology | MIT Technology Review

Laws and Ethics Can’t Keep Pace with Technology | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Employers can get into legal trouble if they ask interviewees about their religion, sexual preference, or political affiliation. Yet they can use social media to filter out job applicants based on their beliefs, looks, and habits. Laws forbid lenders from discriminating on the basis of race, gender, and sexuality. Yet they can refuse to give a loan to people whose Facebook friends have bad payment histories, if their work histories on LinkedIn don’t match their bios on Facebook, or if a computer algorithm judges them to be socially undesirable.

 
Sharrock's insight:

Interesting historical facts putting our present challenges into perspective. 

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NTSB Pushes for Vehicle-To-Vehicle Communication Systems: How Long Until They Appear?

NTSB Pushes for Vehicle-To-Vehicle Communication Systems: How Long Until They Appear? | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
We've spilled a lot of virtual ink over vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-grid communications.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article:

 

"the basic technology behind V2V and V2G systems already exists, and it could theoretically be scaled up fairly quickly. There are, however, at least three hurdles to overcome:bandwidth, money, and the law:


By "bandwidth", we don't mean the speed of the networks carrying and analyzing all this new data (though that could be a major concern in some areas). Instead, we mean the ability of corporations and governments to develop and install the devices, and subsequently, assess the findings.

 

This would likely be easier for car companies, who would simply need to place electronic beacons on vehicles. It could be much harder for cash-strapped municipalities to install cameras at every intersection. And of course, for every car or signal light without those devices, the systems become slightly less effective.

 

Then there's the question of money. The new technology would likely keep motorists safer on the roads, but how much would new-car buyers be willing to shell out for it? How would cities pay for all the devices used to monitor traffic? 

 

Legal hurdles are even more complicated. As with autonomous cars (in which V2V and V2G technology will play a major role), there's the question of fault to consider. If accidents happen after the systems debut -- as they surely will -- who's at fault? The drivers? The automaker? The device manufacturer? The entity that monitors the network? And who's responsible for maintaining that network anyway?"

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Task Force Backs Changes in Legal Education System

Task Force Backs Changes in Legal Education System | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A task force of the American Bar Association is calling for sweeping changes that support more liberal standards and offer opportunities for people without law degrees.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article:

"The overall idea, said James. B. Kobak Jr., a New York lawyer on the task force, was to free law schools to be more innovative and get away from the one-size-fits-all model."

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Artificial Intelligence to make lawyers redundant | Machines Like Us

Artificial Intelligence to make lawyers redundant | Machines Like Us | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Ipselex, a secretive Hong Kong artificial intelligence company, today announced the launch of its web platform.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Ipselex, a secretive Hong Kong artificial intelligence company, today announced the launch of its web platform. The platform offers API-like access to a brain in the cloud that has taught itself to understand and make predictions about patents and patent applications."

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OUCH! Computer system spots fake expressions of pain better than people - News Center

OUCH! Computer system spots fake expressions of pain better than people - News Center | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

This ability has obvious uses for uncovering pain malingering — fabricating or exaggerating the symptoms of pain for a variety of motives — but the system also could be used to detect deceptive actions in the realms of security, psychopathology, job screening, medicine and law. 

 

- See more at: http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2014/04/008.html#sthash.QI4luUTH.dpuf

Sharrock's insight:

Imaging how 85% might get supported with questioning--in the courtroom, at the job interview, in other situations. Or, imagine how the accuracy might get improved with personal data we willingly submit on social networks. Can an algorithm and other data become an expert witness? 

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Defamation in the world of commerce - New York, New Jersey Insurance Attorney | The Killian Firm, P.C.

The elements of a defamation claim are: (1) the assertion of a false and defamatory statement concerning another; (2) the unprivileged publication of that statement to a third party; and (3) fault amounting at least to negligence by the publisher.  According to the Court, “a defamatory statement, generally, is one that subjects an individual to contempt or ridicule, one that harms a person’s reputation by lowering the community’s estimation of him or by deterring others from wanting to associate or deal with him.”

Accusing a financial executive of thievery met the test:  “The statements imputed serious ethical, if not criminal, breaches.”  The Court found that Backtrack had an affirmative duty to confirm the accuracy of the statements before circulating them.

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