Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Neurological Trauma - BrainFacts.org

Neurological Trauma - BrainFacts.org | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

 

Brain injury is all too common, but treatments are being improved constantly. Traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries can lead to significant disabilities and death. In the United States, an estimated 1.7 million people suffer traumatic head injuries each year, and roughly 52,000 will die. The leading causes of traumatic brain injury are falls and motor-vehicle related events.

  
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Research in Brain Function and Learning

Research in Brain Function and Learning | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Interventions
Reward good behaviors quickly and as frequently as possible. Please refer to the module on giving praise. Follow through with consequences. 
When a child breaks the established rules, warn once. If the behavior continues, follow through with the promised consequence immediately. For excessive activity Use activity as a reward. Alternate a seat-based activity with a more physical activity. For example, send the child to the office with a note for the secretary or give an activity that removes the child from the situation. Solicit active responses. Examples include talking, moving or organizing responses. Do not try to reduce physical activity. 
Encourage non-disruptive movement 
Allow students to stand while doing seatwork Positively reinforce effort as well as success. For example, tell the child how well he/she is working. Give clear, concise instructions. Have a child repeat directions to you aloud. Reinforce directions with a visual reminder when appropriate. For example, provide a list on the blackboard of what is expected and the approximate amount of time that each step should take. Allow limited choice of tasks, topics and activities. Use a child’s interest whenever possible in designing activities or introducing material. Match a child’s learning ability and preferred method of response. Allow alternate response modes (computer, taped assignments) with every assignment. Provide a predictable routine in your class. Encourage the use of color coded folders, PDAs etc. Make tasks as interesting as possible. Allow children to work with partners. Alternate high and low interest tasks. Give targeted children priority seating close to the teacher. Increase or provide novelty at later stages of the task to keep the child motivated. Decrease the length of the tasks you assign. Break up tasks into smaller parts. Have tasks arranged so that children complete smaller parts after longer parts. For every unpreferred task, engage in two preferred tasks. Let students know that this will happen. Give fewer math or spelling problems. For example, have the child do only the odd or even problems. Or put fewer problems (words on one page). Use distributed (rather than mass) practice for problems beginning a task. Increase structure and/or add emphasis to relevant parts of a task or assignment. Ask a child to repeat directions. Use written directions. Set realistic standards for acceptable work. Point out topic sentences, headings, etc. to improve task completion. Use lists and assignment organizers. Substitute verbal or motor responses for written responses. Have a child work on easier parts of a task before tackling the more difficult ones. Underline key words in directions. Allow quiet play. Encourage note taking for older children in high school. Reward short intervals of patient waiting. Don’t assume that impulsive behaviors are aggressive. Cue the child to upcoming difficult times when extra control is needed. Bring distracters or toys that are quiet and absorbing. Encourage after school activities. Develop the child’s sense of confidence and responsibility. Model good behavior. Encourage targeted children to play with children who can serve as positive role models. Reward good behavior.
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