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The Next X Prize: Artificial Intelligence! - YouTube

Hank takes you to the next frontier of innovation: the XPrize for Artificial Intelligence, talking about how true AI can be measured, and what the future mig...

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET, Emmanuel Capitaine
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Why Not Nuclear-Powered Aircraft? | RealClearScience

Why Not Nuclear-Powered Aircraft? | RealClearScience | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
We have nuclear submarines and nuclear ships, so why not nuclear planes?
Well, that's a very good question, one the United States spent $1.04 billion back in the 1950s trying to answer.
The idea for...
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Medical First: 3-D Printed Skull Successfully Implanted in Woman - NBC News

Medical First: 3-D Printed Skull Successfully Implanted in Woman - NBC News | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Another day, another advance in 3-D printing technology.Doctors in the Netherlands report that they have for the first time successfully replaced most of a h...
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3D printing: 10 companies using it in ground-breaking ways

3D printing: 10 companies using it in ground-breaking ways | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A growing number of innovative companies are experimenting with 3D printers, propelling the technology closer to the mainstream market.

Via Grant Montgomery
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Marrying tissue engineering with systems biology - MIT News Office

Marrying tissue engineering with systems biology - MIT News Office | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Linda Griffith combines in vitro models with deep molecular analysis to accelerate drug discovery.
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This amazes me: “All the blood in your intestine immediately goes to the liver, which regulates your metabolism, but your gut’s also filled with microbes, and little pieces of microbes leak across the gut wall all the time and interact with the immune system in the liver,” she explains. “If you get a gastrointestinal disease or take a drug that changes the gut permeability, now all of a sudden the liver can see a lot more bacterial products than it’s used to, and it can get inflamed. That may be okay, but if you’re taking a drug or you have some kind of stress, you may harm your liver.”

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High probability of success - MIT News Office

High probability of success - MIT News Office | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
MIT alumnus and entrepreneur Ben Vigoda took his probability-processing technology to market with help from the Institute.

 

Helping computers navigate ambiguity

Vigoda’s group is creating computer chips that perform inferences and machine learning on uncertain data — data that can be incomplete or contradictory — more efficiently than today’s chips. 

“If a normal computer program receives an unanticipated or noisy input, it will ordinarily either give the user an error message, crash the program or even, in some rare cases, crash the machine,” Vigoda says. “With probabilistic processing, the hope is to help the computer directly understand that the world is noisy, ambiguous, or even contradictory, and to be able to cope with that in a more native way.”

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33rd Square: Prototype Holographic Memory Device Created

33rd Square: Prototype Holographic Memory Device Created | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Researchers have demonstrated a holographic memory device that could improve storage capacity and processing capabilities in electronics.
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Sophisticated Spy Tool 'The Mask' Rages Undetected for 7 Years | Threat Level | Wired.com

Sophisticated Spy Tool 'The Mask' Rages Undetected for 7 Years | Threat Level | Wired.com | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Researchers have uncovered a sophisticated cyber spying operation that has been alive since at least 2007 and uses techniques and code that surpass any nation-state spyware previously spotted in the wild.
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X Prize's Peter Diamandis: The Techno-Optimist

X Prize's Peter Diamandis: The Techno-Optimist | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Peter Diamandis founded the X Prize Foundation in 1995 to use competitions and cash prizes to jump-start innovation.
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from the itnerview: "Over the past 100 years, the human life span has more than doubled, the cost of food has dropped thirteenfold, energy has dropped twentyfold, transportation has dropped a hundredfold, communications has dropped over a thousandfold. All of these things have been enabled by technology—and the rate at which technological innovation is occurring is accelerating, not slowing down. I think we're heading toward epic, extraordinary change. I think we're going to transform the way we live, the way we work, the way we govern. I think every aspect of society is going to fundamentally change over the next 30 years."

Read more: X Prize's Peter Diamandis: The Techno-Optimist - Popular Mechanics 
Follow us: @PopMech on Twitter | popularmechanics on Facebook 
Visit us at PopularMechanics.com

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AI's 10 to Watch 2013 - IEEECS

AI's 10 to Watch 2013 - IEEECS | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Every two years, IEEE Intelligent Systems acknowledges and celebrates 10 young stars in the field of AI as "AI's 10 to Watch." These accomplished researchers have all completed their doctoral work in the past five years. Despite being relatively junior in their career, each one has made impressive research contributions and had an impact in the literature — and in some cases, in real-world applications as well.

Nominations in all subfields of AI were sought from a wide range of senior AI researchers. A short list of top candidates was voted on by the award committee, and then the decisions were finalized with the entire advisory and editorial boards of IEEE Intelligent Systems. I would like to take this opportunity to thank two past editors-in-chief of IEEE Intelligent Systems, Jim Hendler and Fei-Yue Wang, who served as the co-chairs of the AI's 10 to Watch award committee and did a great job managing the nomination and selection process.

The group nominated this year was particularly strong. It has been a struggle to choose the best of the best. In the end, the top 10 surfaced with unanimous support from the advisory and editorial boards. We're particularly pleased about the diversity of the winning group. It's safe to say that everyone involved in the selection process has been very proud of these young stars' contributions, of what AI as a community can offer, and how bright the future of AI can be. We're sure that young AI students and researchers will find inspiration from these young stars, and that the AI community will look forward to their continued excellence and sustained impact. Congratulations again to our young colleagues for winning this special recognition!

— Daniel Zeng

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Anthony Goldbloom | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review

Anthony Goldbloom | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A startup called Kaggle tries to bring smart people to knotty problems.

 

Goldbloom created "a website where data scientists could compete to win cash in their spare time by solving such problems for companies. He didn’t know much about programming, so he taught himself to code and built the website in his bedroom in Melbourne, Australia.

Sharrock's insight:

Another use of competition and networking to find solutions.

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Leslie Dewan | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review

Leslie Dewan | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
What if we could build a nuclear reactor that costs half as much, consumes nuclear waste, and will never melt down?
Sharrock's insight:

This is awesome! A new, much safer and more energy-efficient design for atomic fission power plants.

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From Online to Offline: How Technology Is Enabling the Real World

From Online to Offline: How Technology Is Enabling the Real World | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
What excites me most about innovation today is the effect it can have on how we engage with the world around us from the way we connect with others to...
Sharrock's insight:

The article explores how people use online resources to interact with people and their immediate environments. The "creative braintrust" section of fast company seems to be an excellent area to explore ideas at the cutting edge. There are resources being used now about which few people know. The app called "Highlight" seems promising. Interesting. 

 

Are you a user of Highlight? Do you have a Highlight story/anecdote? or do you use something similar to Highlight? 

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What Are "Nearables," And Why Is Ideo So Excited About Them?

What Are "Nearables," And Why Is Ideo So Excited About Them? | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Bluetooth beacons enter a new interactive frontier with Estimote's sticker-size hardware Last week beacon technology--sensors which can trigger actions in devices that come within range, increasing their spatial intelligence--shrank in size and...
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Neuron Light Switch Now Goes “On” and “Off” | MIT Technology Review

Neuron Light Switch Now Goes “On” and “Off” | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A new optogenetic protein gives neuroscientists more control over brain circuits.

 

Optogenetics is a recent innovation in neuroscience that gives researchers the ability to control the activity of neurons with light. With this powerful tool, researchers are teasing apart the biological basis of memory, behavior, and disease (see “Scientists Make Mice ‘Remember’ Things That Didn’t Happen” and “An On-Off Switch for Anxiety,”). But for the first several years of this technology’s existence, the proteins that scientists added to neurons to make them react to light were only good at activating neurons. That limited researchers’ ability to understand neuronal circuits, sets of interconnected neurons that are thought to control behavior and, when misfiring, to underlie many brain conditions. Problems can arise from any imbalance in circuit activity, whether too much or too little. 


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Why Facebook Bought Oculus Rift for $2 Billion | MIT Technology Review

Why Facebook Bought Oculus Rift for $2 Billion | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Facebook acquired Oculus Rift because it believes virtual reality could be the next big thing after mobile.
Sharrock's insight:

This could be huge! People might one day interact using animated avatars in virtual public, virtual private, in constructed locations or in fantasy realms. Not just in games but in immediate narratives. Educational innovations will probably quickly follow behind the entertainment innovations as will some STEM business applications.  People will be able to interact with virtual objects, concepts, and symbols that will allow creativity and innovation. New recording technologies may develop as well, transforming all that occurs in this virtual reality into a kind of narrative.

Very soon though, there might be other innovations where existing technologies that include touch-simulation and gesture controls might get integrated with the Oculus concept in a way that brings people close to the "holodeck" experience. 

 

excerpt: 

"The headset, designed by 21-year-old Palmer Luckey, has been available as a developer kit since March 2013. So far it’s primarily been used for video games (see “Can Oculus Rift Turn Virtual Wonder into Commercial Reality?”). John Carmack, co-creator of the seminal 3-D video game Doom, joined Oculus VR in August; many enthusiasts and independent game makers have already released games and demos for the hardware. This has happened even though the company hasn’t announced a launch date for a commercial version of the hardware. At this point the device isn’t expected to be released any earlier than the end of this year."

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highcodata's comment, April 1, 2014 8:06 AM
Au delà de la transaction financière, ce qui comptera ce sont les usages qui ne se limitent pas qu'au jeu comme en témoigne la vidéo de tesco qui revisite le parcours shopper http://tiny.cc/xezmdx
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Solving a convex mirror problem | Physics Inventions/New Inventions In Science and Physics

Solving a convex mirror problem | Physics Inventions/New Inventions In Science and Physics | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Solving a convex mirror problem http://t.co/PGZ4aiVnCL
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Can entrenched energy systems undergo rapid changes? - MIT News Office

Can entrenched energy systems undergo rapid changes? - MIT News Office | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
MIT Energy Conference explores recent dramatic developments in the energy landscape, and outlines the need for more.
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excerpt: "But as promising as these technologies may be, their widespread implementation remains years away, van der Hoeven suggested. While such storage systems might be competitive today in some places, battery costs need to come down considerably to be competitive in most situations, she said. And today, she pointed out, fossil fuels still account for 82 percent of global energy — a figure that hasn’t changed in two decades."

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33rd Square | Great Idea for Touch Screens in Cars

33rd Square | Great Idea for Touch Screens in Cars | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
San Francisco-based designer Mattaeus Krenn has come up with an ingenious concept of how touch screen controls in cars should actually work.
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Researchers Developing Pizza That Lasts For Years

Researchers Developing Pizza That Lasts For Years | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
NATICK, Mass. (AP) — They call it the holy grail of ready-to-eat meals for soldiers — a pizza that can stay on the shelf for up to three years and still remain good to eat.

Soldiers have been asking for pizza since lightweight individual...
Sharrock's insight:

meals ready to eat (MREs)

 

excerpt: 

"It pretty much tastes just like a typical pan pizza that you would make at home and take out of the oven or the toaster oven," she said. "The only thing missing from that experience would be it's not hot when you eat it. It's room temperature."

Turkey pepperoni pizza also will be available for soldiers who do not eat pork products.

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GM's Super Cruise Puts (Almost) Autonomous Cars On The Road By 2020

GM's Super Cruise Puts (Almost) Autonomous Cars On The Road By 2020 | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Hot on the heels of last week's announcement that Nissan would bring autonomous cars to showrooms within seven years comes word from General Motors that it plans to offer its own lineup of autonomous cars by the year 2020.
Sharrock's insight:

Super Cruise!

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Meet Hao Li, 2013 Innovator Under 35 | MIT Technology Review

Meet Hao Li, 2013 Innovator Under 35 | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Inventing smarter animation that bridges the gap between the physical and digital worlds.
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Leah Busque | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review

Leah Busque | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Leah Busque “quit IBM to work on an idea she had: that people should be able to go online and easily hire their neighbors to do quick errands and other odd jobs. She later called it TaskRabbit."

 

“Today, 13,000 TaskRabbits bid for jobs in 14 U.S. cities. Three-quarters of them hold bachelor’s degrees; 5 percent have PhDs. These “micro-entrepreneurs,” as Busque calls them, include retirees, mothers, the unemployed, and the underpaid. They do everything from delivering lunches and fixing toilets to dressing up as a hot dog for a surprise birthday party (true story). Pay might be as low as $10 per task, but some skilled jobs fetch hundreds, especially for TaskRabbits with high reputation rankings on the site. The employer pays a 20 percent commission to TaskRabbit.”

Sharrock's insight:

This was something some futurists and economists predicted: that people would be hired out for limited work in addition to other more predictable, stable work. This has more implications and "revolution", in connection with Kaggle, is a powerfully accurate description.

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Julie Kientz | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review

Julie Kientz | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
If you want to use technology to make life better for people with autism and their families, the trick is to make the technology secondary.

 

"By working as a therapist and talking to others, Kientz identified problems with the paper-based method. One was that multiple therapists might need to review a child’s records, but there was only one copy of the binder filled with hand-marked charts and notes. And with data points trapped on paper, there wasn’t a good way to visualize broader trends or review negative blips in a child’s otherwise positive progress.

 

Kientz’s solution was for therapists to use a digital recording pen and special paper that could digitize their writing. The change was unobtrusive to the therapist and invisible to the child. But notes and chart inputs made their way automatically into a database and were synched with video recordings of each session. This meant therapists could project progress graphs at meetings and pinpoint moments when a child didn’t perform as well as expected. They could immediately access video from that moment in a therapy session; in one instance, therapists reviewed the video and agreed that they each had different standards for a “right” response. As a result, the child was given credit for mastering a skill and could move on to new challenges."

Sharrock's insight:

This systems might have other implications in education. It could be put in the hands of educators who are tracking other behaviors and progress that could help with instruction and intervention decision making in special education--developing functional behavioral assessments, tracking distraction, tracking reading/decoding in running records, math problem solution process, etc. It could also help with the general education classroom and Response to Intervention. Imagine if Google Glass was also "tapped" to support with video recording and augmented reality support.

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Liangfang Zhang | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review

Liangfang Zhang | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A nanoengineering scheme to make drugs more effective by fooling the immune system.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "Zhang derives red-blood-cell membranes from blood samples and uses them to coat polymer nanoparticles. Because these particles look like red blood cells on the surface, they can fool the immune system; loaded with drugs, they serve as robust and long-lived drug carriers. An unexpected bonus: they can also act like nanoscale sponges to suck up toxic proteins produced by infectious bacteria or introduced by snake or insect venom. If the particles flood the bloodstream, they will divert most of the toxin away from actual cells."

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