Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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10 Ways Scientists Messed With Children's Minds - Listverse

10 Ways Scientists Messed With Children's Minds - Listverse | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
10 Ways Scientists Messed With Children’s Minds
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Cusp 2011 Dr. Richard Satava

As Professor of Surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center and Senior Science Advisor at the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command in Ft....
Sharrock's insight:

Robotic medicine and biotechnology advances are demonstrated in this video presentation dated 2011. Even back then, it is apparent that we can fix genetic mistakes, replace any organ (except the brain), perform surgery at almost any scale, and even clone ourselves. What SHOULDN"T we be able to do though? How should we limit these advances? How should students prepare for the biotech era and economy?

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Sharrock's curator insight, January 10, 2013 1:35 PM

This video from 2011 reveals successes in medicine already demonstrated. Every organ of the body can be transplanted and replaced except the brain, operations can be done by robots, operations can be done on specific cells. This surgeon can be found on the Internet. As the military implements some of the devices and systems seen here, civilians will eventually benefit from these advances as well. The video says a great deal about how far technology has come, but also explores, briefly, the ethical and moral implications. Considering the tech implications from another point of view, outside of medicine, I think of manufacturing. Right now, it seems that manufacturing and assembling by hand has not been automated yet. But imagine if one person assembled 10 devices at the same time as a  kind of sorcerer's apprentice. Imagine if the moves were "recorded" and performed by machine memory. The video is about 24 minutes long, but it is worth watching to realize the world is changing fast!

Sharrock's comment, January 10, 2013 3:11 PM
Robotic medicine and biotechnology advances are demonstrated in this video presentation dated 2011. Even back then, it is apparent that we can fix genetic mistakes, replace any organ (except the brain), perform surgery at almost any scale, and even clone ourselves. What SHOULDN"T we be able to do though? How should we limit these advances? How should students prepare for the biotech era and economy?
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How journals like Nature, Cell and Science are damaging science | Randy Schekman

How journals like Nature, Cell and Science are damaging science | Randy Schekman | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
It is common, and encouraged by many journals, for research to be judged by the impact factor of the journal that publishes it. But as a journal's score is an average, it says little about the quality of any individual piece of research. What is more, citation is sometimes, but not always, linked to quality. A paper can become highly cited because it is good science – or because it is eye-catching, provocative or wrong. Luxury-journal editors know this, so they accept papers that will make waves because they explore sexy subjects or make challenging claims. This influences the science that scientists do. It builds bubbles in fashionable fields where researchers can make the bold claims these journals want, while discouraging other important work, such as replication studies.
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The author suggests solutions: "There is a better way, through the new breed of open-access journals that are free for anybody to read, and have no expensive subscriptions to promote. Born on the web, they can accept all papers that meet quality standards, with no artificial caps. Many are edited by working scientists, who can assess the worth of papers without regard for citations. As I know from my editorship of eLife, an open access journal funded by the Wellcome Trust, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Max Planck Society, they are publishing world-class science every week."

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