Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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New flat transistor defies theoretical limit

New flat transistor defies theoretical limit | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A team of researchers with members from the University of California and Rice University has found a way to get a flat transistor to defy theoretical limitations on Field Effect Transistors (FETs). In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes their work and why they believe it could lead to consumer devices that have both smaller electronics and longer battery life. Katsuhiro Tomioka with Erasmus MC University Medical Center in the Netherlands offers a News & Views article discussing the work done by the team in the same journal edition.

 

As Tomioka notes, the materials and type of architecture currently used in creating small consumer electronic devices is rapidly reaching a threshold upon which a tradeoff will have to be made—smaller transistors or more power requirements—this is because of the unique nature of FETs, shortening the channel they use requires more power, on a logarithmic scale. Thus, to continue making FETs ever smaller and to get them to use less power means two things, the first is that a different channel material must be found, one that allow high switch-on currents at low voltages. The second is a way must be found to lower the voltage required for the FETs.

 

Researchers have made inroads on the first requirement, building FETs with metal-oxide-semiconductor materials, for example. The second has proved to be more challenging. In this latest effort, the researchers looked to tunneling to reduce voltage demands, the results of which are called, quite naturally, tunneling FETs or TFETs—they require less voltage because they are covered (by a gate stack) and work by transporting a charge via quantum-tunneling. The device the team built is based on a 2D bilayer of molybdenum disulfide and bulk germanium—it demonstrated a negative differential resistance, a marker of tunneling, and a very steep subthreshold slope (the switching property associated with rapid turn-on) which fell below the classical theoretical limit.

 

The work by the team represents substantial progress in solving the miniturization problem for future electronics devices, but as the team notes, there is still much to do. They express optimism that further improvements will lead to not just better consumer devices, but tiny sensors that could be introduced into the body to help monitor health.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Transistors that wrap around tissues and morph with them

Transistors that wrap around tissues and morph with them | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Electronic devices that become soft when implanted inside the body and can deploy to grip 3-D objects, such as large tissues, nerves and blood vessels have been created by researchers from The University of Texas at Dallas and the University of Tokyo.

 

These biologically adaptive, flexible transistors might one day help doctors learn more about what is happening inside the body, and also could be used to stimulate the body for treatments.

 

The research, published in Advanced Materials, is one of the first demonstrations of transistors that can change shape and maintain their electronic properties after they are implanted in the body, said Jonathan Reeder, a graduate student in materials science and engineering and lead author of the work.

 

“Scientists and physicians have been trying to put electronics in the body for a while now, but one of the problems is that the stiffness of common electronics is not compatible with biological tissue,” he said.

 

“You need the device to be stiff at room temperature so the surgeon can implant the device, but soft and flexible enough to wrap around 3-D objects so the body can behave exactly as it would without the device. By putting electronics on shape-changing and softening polymers, we can do just that.”

 

Shape memory polymers (plastics) developed by Dr. Walter Voit, assistant professor of materials science and engineering and mechanical engineering and an author of the paper, are key to enabling the technology.

 

The polymers respond to the body’s environment and become less rigid when they’re implanted. In addition to the polymers, the electronic devices are built with layers that include thin, flexible electronic foils first characterized by a group including Reeder in work published last year in Nature.

 

The Voit and Reeder team from the Advanced Polymer Research Lab in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science fabricated the devices with an organic semiconductor but used adapted techniques normally applied to create silicon electronics that could reduce the cost of the devices.


“We used a new technique in our field to essentially laminate and cure the shape memory polymers on top of the transistors,” said Voit, who is also a member of the Texas Biomedical Device Center. “In our device design, we are getting closer to the size and stiffness of precision biologic structures, but have a long way to go to match nature’s amazing complexity, function and organization.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Keith Wayne Brown's curator insight, May 15, 2014 9:39 AM

A necessary step for posthumanity.

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Electronics Weekly News | Research | 3D graphene for super-capacitors

Electronics Weekly News | Research | 3D graphene for super-capacitors | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
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Stacking 2-D materials produces surprising results - MIT News Office

Stacking 2-D materials produces surprising results - MIT News Office | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
New experiments reveal previously unseen effects, could lead to new kinds of electronics and optical devices.
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"The MIT team also observed an interesting new physical phenomenon. When exposed to a magnetic field, the material exhibits fractal properties — known as a Hofstadter butterfly energy spectrum — that were described decades ago by theorists, but thought impossible in the real world. There is intense research in this area; two other research groups also report on these Hofstadter butterfly effects this week in the journal Nature."

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Unlock Your Car with a Bluetooth Powered Keyless Entry System

Unlock Your Car with a Bluetooth Powered Keyless Entry System | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Unlocking your car isn't exactly tough, but if you want to spice it up a bit, The Mercuino Project shows off how to unlock your doors with Bluetooth and an Arduino.
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33rd Square: Researcher Rewires Rat Brains To Sense Infrared Spectrum and Promises Much More

33rd Square: Researcher Rewires Rat Brains To Sense Infrared Spectrum and Promises Much More | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Neuroscientist Miguel Nicolelis, whose research into man-machine interfaces and neuroplasticity could one day allow people to communicate directly with electronic devices by thought alone recently unveiled how his team's work allowed rats to sense...
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33rd Square: Jobs Outlook For Nanotechnology Looks Bright

33rd Square: Jobs Outlook For Nanotechnology Looks Bright | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
With the emerging nanotechnology industry, thinking small and acting big is the name of the game. Nanoscale engineering and science will impact nearly every industry from biotech to electronics over the coming years.
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New wonder material replaces graphene for future electronic devices | KurzweilAI

New wonder material replaces graphene for future electronic devices | KurzweilAI | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
This diagram shows the flat-sheet structure of molybdenum disulfide --- molybdenum atoms shown in teal, sulfur atoms in yellow (credit:  Han Wang et...
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The Untold Story Of The Invention Of The Game Cartridge

The Untold Story Of The Invention Of The Game Cartridge | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
If you’ve ever used one, you have two men to thank: Wallace Kirschner and Lawrence Haskel, who invented the game cartridge 40 years ago while working at an obscure company and rebounding from a business failure. Once the pair's programmable system had been streamlined and turned into a commercial product—the Channel F console—by a team at pioneering electronics company Fairchild, it changed the fundamental business model of home video games forever. By injecting flexibility into a new technology, it paved the way for massive industry growth and the birth of a new creative medium.
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33rd Square: Prototype Holographic Memory Device Created

33rd Square: Prototype Holographic Memory Device Created | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Researchers have demonstrated a holographic memory device that could improve storage capacity and processing capabilities in electronics.
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High Energy Silicon Batteries Edge Closer to Market | MIT Technology Review

High Energy Silicon Batteries Edge Closer to Market | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Amprius’s silicon-based batteries are starting to appear in electronics.
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