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Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Stop asking if Piketty was right or wrong; not everyone will ever agree anyway

Stop asking if Piketty was right or wrong; not everyone will ever agree anyway | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

 Computer bugs and Excel mishaps are inevitable because code is written by humans and even brilliant economists aren’t perfect. But careful researchers catch important mistakes; they debug their work until the remaining bugs don’t change the result very much when they are fixed. In both the Piketty and Reinhart and Rogoff cases, it seems the bugs exposed didn’t change their original results. This explains why, while most people assume a bug is a sign of unforgivable sloppiness, economists shrug, point out the results didn’t change much, and think that’s an adequate defense. The economists are right; the existence of a bug isn’t necessarily a big deal.

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "At the end one of three things happen: the field comes to a consensus about whether the incumbent is right and the original research was wrong or scholars may decide original research was once right but things have changed. Or the most likely outcome: there’s no agreement and competing schools of thought form around personal judgment on whose assumptions are worse. It’s not pretty; but data is imperfect, subject to interpretation and the economy constantly evolves. That’s the best researchers (in any field) can do. If you look hard enough, at any study, you can always find something you disagree with and assumptions that didn’t prove correct, even in hard sciences. For good or bad, Piketty wrote the right book at the right time, which meant undue praise and unfair criticism."

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We've Built Driverless Cars. Can We Build Their Drivers?

We've Built Driverless Cars. Can We Build Their Drivers? | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The most dangerous moment in a self-driving car involves no immediate or obvious peril.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "Thrust back into control while going full-speed on the freeway, the driver might be unable to take stock of all the obstacles on the road, or she might still be expecting her computer to do something it can't. Her reaction speed might be slower than if she'd been driving all along, she might be distracted by the email she was writing or she might choose not to take over at all, leaving a confused car in command. There's also the worry that people's driving skills will rapidly deteriorate as they come to rely on their robo-chauffeurs."



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