Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Smaller, faster, greener "high-rise" 3D chips are ready for Big Data

Smaller, faster, greener "high-rise" 3D chips are ready for Big Data | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Stanford engineers have pioneered a new design for a scalable 3D computer chip that tightly interconnects logic and memory, with the effect of minimizing data bottlenecks and saving on energy usage.
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Stanford Inventors Designs Safe Way to Transfer Energy to Medical Chips in The Body

Stanford Inventors Designs Safe Way to Transfer Energy to Medical Chips in The Body | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A very interesting video was published by Stanford University in which inventors describe how they re-designed batteries not to be bigger than a grain of rice therefore medical devices implanted into the body could be much much smaller.

Via Emmanuel Capitaine
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Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience

Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The new computing approach is based on the biological nervous system, specifically on how neurons react to stimuli and connect with other neurons to interpret information.
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Quoc Le | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review

Quoc Le | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

While at Stanford, Le worked out a strategy that would let software learn things itself. Academics had begun to report promising but very slow results with a method known as deep learning, which uses networks of simulated neurons. Le saw how to speed it up significantly—by building simulated neural networks 100 times larger that could process thousands of times more data. It was an approach practical enough to attract the attention of Google, which hired him to test it under the guidance of the AI researcher Andrew Ng (see “A Chinese Internet Giant Starts to Dream”).

 
Sharrock's insight:

It amazes me that the idea of machine "deep learning" became public in 2012 (written 8/19/14). That's only 2 years ago! With the invention of the synapse processor chip and chips similar to this, deep learning will probably increase in terms of power, granularity, and impact on even more human-superior tasks: "The technique is now used in Google’s image search and speech-recognition software. The ultra-intelligent machine Le once imagined remains distant. But seeing his ideas make software smart enough to assist people in their everyday lives feels pretty good." Such technology will have more immediate impacts on radiology and diagnostics, as it does in the image search services, but may also increase capabilities in music and reading recommendation services. Who knows what else? 

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Energy Efficient Brain Simulator Outperforms Supercomputers

Energy Efficient Brain Simulator Outperforms Supercomputers | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Neurogrid is a computing platform that scientists hope will revolutionize our understanding of the brain.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "The difference is that the computations that underlie whether or not a neuron fires are driven by continuous, non-linear processes, more akin to an analog signal. Neurogrid uses an analog signal for computations, and a digital signal for communication. In doing so, it follows the samehybrid

 analog-digital approach as the brain."

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Scientists Insert A Light-Emitting Bioprobe Into A Living Cell

Scientists Insert A Light-Emitting Bioprobe Into A Living Cell | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A group of Stanford researchers have inserted a nano-sized, light-producing bioprobe into a single living cell for the first time, which could have
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