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In Pursuit Of Truth: A Brand’s Guide To Managing Misinformation Online

In Pursuit Of Truth: A Brand’s Guide To Managing Misinformation Online | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

The Internet has rewritten the rules for what can be viewed as fact versus fiction. From fake online reviews to inaccurate media articles, it’s impossible to truly know what online information is real and what is fabricated. The same holds true for the voices of online audiences, whether it’s a tweet, a comment on an article or a blog post.

In an attempt to eradicate the mystery, it was recently reported that European scientists are developing a “social media lie detector” called PHEME for popular social media channels like Facebook and Twitter. Using technology like natural language processing, PHEME will review and put online rumors into one of four categories – speculation, controversy, misinformation and disinformation.

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Via Bonnie Hohhof
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How to Curate Your Facebook News Feed

How to Curate Your Facebook News Feed | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Excerpt from article by Mashable:
"Baby photos. News articles. Selfies. Advertisements. Job announcements.
It's likely your Facebook News Feed contains some combination of these, if not all of them (and likely other categories, too). That's both the beauty and the curse of News Feed: It provides updates from all aspects of your life in one place, including those you may not care to see.

Mashable sat down with Greg Marra, Facebook's product manager for News Feed, to discuss how users can best curate the content that they see in News Feed. The easiest way to change what you see? Engage with content, says Marra.

"The basic interactions of News Feed are some of the most important signals that we get," he explains. "Unfortunately, those interactions aren't able to capture everything that we want to know, so we also give people additional controls to tell us things we can't figure out just from normal usage of News Feed."

Here's what we learned.
- If You Want to Stop Seeing Posts From a Facebook Friend...
- If You Want to See More Posts From a Facebook Friend...
- Create Additional, Personalized News Feed Lists
- You Can't Eliminate Ads, But You Can Give Feedback
- Take Facebook's Survey

The moral of the story: With the exception of Facebook ads, you should be able to eliminate anything (or anyone) you don't like from your Facebook News Feed. It requires you to put in a little effort, but hey, these digital newspapers aren't going to write themselves..."

Each point is analyzed with detailed information. Read full article here:
http://mashable.com/2014/01/19/facebook-news-feed-curation/

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
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Joseph Ruiz's curator insight, January 20, 5:02 AM

Great tips for more seeing more relevant Facebook content

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What Can Psychology Tell Us About Why People Go To Facebook? - SocialTimes

What Can Psychology Tell Us About Why People Go To Facebook? - SocialTimes | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
If you ask someone why they go on Facebook, you should get a lot of different responses. Some will say
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Why Facebook Bought Oculus Rift for $2 Billion | MIT Technology Review

Why Facebook Bought Oculus Rift for $2 Billion | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Facebook acquired Oculus Rift because it believes virtual reality could be the next big thing after mobile.
Sharrock's insight:

This could be huge! People might one day interact using animated avatars in virtual public, virtual private, in constructed locations or in fantasy realms. Not just in games but in immediate narratives. Educational innovations will probably quickly follow behind the entertainment innovations as will some STEM business applications.  People will be able to interact with virtual objects, concepts, and symbols that will allow creativity and innovation. New recording technologies may develop as well, transforming all that occurs in this virtual reality into a kind of narrative.

Very soon though, there might be other innovations where existing technologies that include touch-simulation and gesture controls might get integrated with the Oculus concept in a way that brings people close to the "holodeck" experience. 

 

excerpt: 

"The headset, designed by 21-year-old Palmer Luckey, has been available as a developer kit since March 2013. So far it’s primarily been used for video games (see “Can Oculus Rift Turn Virtual Wonder into Commercial Reality?”). John Carmack, co-creator of the seminal 3-D video game Doom, joined Oculus VR in August; many enthusiasts and independent game makers have already released games and demos for the hardware. This has happened even though the company hasn’t announced a launch date for a commercial version of the hardware. At this point the device isn’t expected to be released any earlier than the end of this year."

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highcodata's comment, April 1, 5:06 AM
Au delà de la transaction financière, ce qui comptera ce sont les usages qui ne se limitent pas qu'au jeu comme en témoigne la vidéo de tesco qui revisite le parcours shopper http://tiny.cc/xezmdx
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Prolonged Exposure to Facebook Makes You Hate Your Life, Study Finds - SocialTimes

Prolonged Exposure to Facebook Makes You Hate Your Life, Study Finds - SocialTimes | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Facebook is like a happy family album, with people posting positive updates and inspirational affirmations. But is all this happiness making us unhappy?
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: 

"A recent study suggests the answer is yes. The study conducted by PLOS one followed 82 people by text message over a 14-day period. The results indicate that the more participants used Facebook, the less satisfied they were with their lives.

Another study says that “passive following” onFacebook could lead to envy and a diminished self image. The study attributed this “envy spiral” to the proliferation of self-promotion and reputation management on social networking sites."

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