futures thinking
Follow
102 views | +0 today
futures thinking
This topic looks at futures thinking that can sensibly craft possible scenarios for futures thinking around amongst others higher education and technology.
Curated by Pamela Ryan
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from Tertiary education landscapes
Scoop.it!

The Imminent Shakeout? Disruptive Innovation and Higher Education - Forbes

The Imminent Shakeout? Disruptive Innovation and Higher Education - Forbes | futures thinking | Scoop.it

Darden School (Business School) at the University of Virginia (Photo credit: Wikipedia) One can hardly go a day without seeing an article touting the end of the University as we know it as the rise of online education, and in particular Massively ...


Via Trish McCluskey
more...
Trish McCluskey's curator insight, March 30, 2013 3:41 AM
Another article in the deluge of doom and gloom for HE but the dots are beginning to form a picture and it's up to us how we join them!
Scooped by Pamela Ryan
Scoop.it!

Digital Fluency

Digital Fluency | futures thinking | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela Ryan
Scoop.it!

How The World Uses Social Networks (Insanely Detailed Infographic)

How The World Uses Social Networks (Insanely Detailed Infographic) | futures thinking | Scoop.it
Most infographics touch on the rough edges of data. They dabble in studies and research. Not this one. It dives in and relishes the massive amount of information on how the world uses social networks.
Pamela Ryan's insight:

Insanely interesting. I gazed at this for quite a few minutes.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from OER Research Hub
Scoop.it!

The Ed Techie: Openness has won - now what?

The Ed Techie: Openness has won - now what? | futures thinking | Scoop.it
As we start the new year and survey the open education landscape, it's hard not to conclude that openness has prevailed. The victory may not be absolute, but the trend is all one way now - we'll never go back...

Via Robert Farrow, OER Hub
more...
ChrisPegler's curator insight, January 15, 2013 3:38 AM

Martin Weller asks us whether we have success in openness but don't recognise what we've got (it may not look quite as we expected). Agree?

Scooped by Pamela Ryan
Scoop.it!

Rebooting Graduate Education in the Humanities - The Conversation - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Rebooting Graduate Education in the Humanities - The Conversation - The Chronicle of Higher Education | futures thinking | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from Content Curation World
Scoop.it!

Exploratory Design for Curated Collections: Empowering Spatial, Experiential Interaction Through Information Landscapes

Exploratory Design for Curated Collections: Empowering Spatial, Experiential Interaction Through Information Landscapes | futures thinking | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Tim Wray explores the new frontiers of curated collections (from a museum perspective), and in doing so, he analyzes the concept of "landscapes", a possible emerging metaphor for how large sets of relevant information items could be better organized for viewing, even outside the specific museum setting.


His goal in doing this is one of finding out how to build effective interfaces that reveal and unravel narratives within collections. How can that be designed into the collection?


Tim Wray is particularly interested in this research, because he is also the brain behind a new and upcoming app called A Place for Art, and which has likely lots to do with art exploration and discovery.


The key point he makes in this interesting article (part of a longer series) is the illustration of the two concepts of "containers" and "landscapes", and about how they closely relate to the organization and access of curated collections.


In Tim Wray's view, the future, especially when we look at large collections, is in the increased adoption of "landscapes" organizing approaches versus the ever-present "container" approach we use for most collections today.


He writes: "I hint at the necessary shift from the former to the latter as a mechanism for providing context for objects, and how landscapes – combined with engaging interaction designs and the notion of pliability – can used as a way of providing immersive experiences for museum collections."


I think that Tim's ideas reflect a growing critical issue for anyone who attempts to curate large collections of information items: having an organization and navigation system that helps the newcomer, find and discover what it may interest him the most.


I myself feel quite frustrated by the absence of curation tools that truly allow me to organize and make accessible / discoverable large lists of information items in more effectives ways than the typical list, table or grid.


But I am positive that the future of curation will inevitably revolve around those who will find, invent and design new and effective ways to do so.


P.S.: Tim Wray is a PhD student that looks at how computational methods and interaction design can be used to create beautiful, engaging experiences for museum collections.


Very Interesting. Must-read for app designers. 9/10


Full article: http://timwray.net/2012/07/collections-as-landscapes-thoughts-in-experiential-interaction/




Via Robin Good
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from iPads in Education
Scoop.it!

12 Principles Of Mobile Learning

12 Principles Of Mobile Learning | futures thinking | Scoop.it
"
Mobile Learning is about self-actuated personalization.

As learning practices and technology tools change, mobile learning itself will continue to evolve. For 2013, the focus is on a variety of challenges, from how learners access content to how the idea of a “curriculum” is defined."


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Laura Conley, John Evans
more...
Helene Testud's curator insight, December 16, 2012 11:41 PM

 

 

 
Emily DiGiulio's curator insight, July 12, 2013 6:48 AM

12 Principles of Mobile Learning

roberto gilli's curator insight, October 31, 2013 2:46 AM

I would add: "on-the-job".

Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

Coursera starts process of taking control of and monetising formerly free MOOC. Here we go...

Coursera starts process of taking control of and monetising formerly free MOOC. Here we go... | futures thinking | Scoop.it
This morning, Coursera, the "massively open online course" or MOOC platform founded by two Stanford professors, announced that they’d be partnering with ACE, the American Council on Education, to offer a path to college credit for select...

 

Starting early next year, anyone who successfully completes one of the selected Coursera courses will have the chance to take a proctored exam over the web from ACE, pay a small fee, and earn credit that could be accepted at up to 2,000 universities nationwide.The move comes in the midst of a struggle in the ed-tech movement over business models and openness. The issue is this: beginning with MIT’s Open CourseWare in 2001, the world’s greatest public and nonprofit universities started offering access to some of their professors’ lectures, notes, and other materials online for free. The stuff was under Creative Commons license, meaning anyone could use it or re-use it as they saw fit; but the material--45-minute, amateur-recorded lectures, years-old problem sets--often just sat there, as hard to find and underutilized as books moldering in the library stacks. That changed last January when Stanford’s open online AI course, based on short, snappy videos and quizzes, went viral, with over 200,000 signups. Enter the venture capitalists. That same educational material, funded by taxpayer money and private philanthropy, that used to be available to anyone for free is now being served on a platform that makes it easier to use, but places restrictions on its reuse and may have fees associated with it in the future. Now MOOCs may be very, very popular, but they’re not really open anymore.

 

Comment: no comment needed really. MOOCs may be massive and online, they are not open, as I noted earlier on November 11th: Coursera praises MOOC-wrapping as they attempt to ban it | Hapgood | Mike Caulfield, and on November 8th: At Educause, a discussion about OER | Inside Higher Ed | Steve Kolowich.


Via Clive Hilton, Peter B. Sloep
more...
Paul Gagnon's comment, November 15, 2012 3:14 PM
Why am I not surprised...Horseshara...
Peter B. Sloep's comment, November 15, 2012 3:37 PM
No, the money has got to come from somewhere. Particularly if you have venture capitalists breathing in your neck. Still, read yesterday's MOOC pedagogy and accreditation by Terry Anderson. We should not become complacent and just think that it will blow over, it won't.
Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

Do online courses spell the end for the traditional university? | The Guardian | Carole Cadwalladr

Do online courses spell the end for the traditional university? | The Guardian | Carole Cadwalladr | futures thinking | Scoop.it

"Publishing, music, shopping, journalism – all revolutionised by the internet. Next in line? Education. Now US academics are offering world-class tuition – free – to anyone who can log on, anywhere in the world, is this the end of campus life?"

 

Comment: A long but rich article about xMOOCs. Sebastian Thrun features large in the historical overview, which goes from Udacity to Coursera and edX. It touches upon the Open University and why they are not a viable alternative to MOOCs for many students (with £5000 per year too expensive), indeed why higher education in England with its fees of £9000 a year is giving the competition a field day. For education has become a market, Carole argues, and competition there is. How the MOOC providers would do the accreditation is of course an issue, but the people whom she talked to either are doing MOOCs for the fun of it, personal development etc, or are students who complain about the low quality of what their university offers to them and use the MOOC course as a complement. She concludes saying that  "These websites [of MOOCs] are barely months old. They're still figuring out the basics. Universities aren't going anywhere just yet. But who knows what they'll look like in 10 years' time? A decade ago, I thought newspapers would be here for ever. That nothing could replace a book."  (peter sloep, @pbsloep)


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from Education Technologies | Scoop.it
Scoop.it!

100 social media blog posts from 2012 that you simply have to bookmark

100 social media blog posts from 2012 that you simply have to bookmark | futures thinking | Scoop.it
Social media blogs are updated with thousands of posts on a weekly basis, but we wanted to sift through a list and create the 100 best ones from 2012 (A lot of great blog posts!
Via Susan Bainbridge, Maria Margarida Correia, Alfredo Corell, Evelina Alor, GSeremetakis, Nader Ale Ebrahim, Arthur Correia
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela Ryan
Scoop.it!

20th Century Assessment In A 21st Century Learning Environment

20th Century Assessment In A 21st Century Learning Environment | futures thinking | Scoop.it
20th Century Assessment In A 21st Century Learning Environment: project-based learning, digital learning, transfer...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from iPads in Education
Scoop.it!

10 Ways That Mobile Learning Will Revolutionize Education

10 Ways That Mobile Learning Will Revolutionize Education | futures thinking | Scoop.it
Smartphones and tablet computers are radically transforming how we access our shared knowledge sources by keeping us constantly connected to near-infinite volumes of raw data and information.
Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from Corridor of learning
Scoop.it!

Building Democratic Learning

Building Democratic Learning | futures thinking | Scoop.it

The Limits of MOOCs I’ve been following a discussion thread about MOOCs (Massive Online Open Courses) on the ALT list and wrote this about the Limits of MOOCs, something that I think we are trying to address here on the WikiQuals project.
I’ve been participating in MOOCs and working on various #open #learning strategies and projects, for some time; I actually don’t think MOOCs are now much about learning at all; they have become content-driven #edspam and work in similar ways to spam, with a very limited ‘completion’ rate.


Via Alastair Creelman
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

Brainstorm in Progress: #MOOCs and #Connectivist Instructional Design

Brainstorm in Progress: #MOOCs and #Connectivist Instructional Design | futures thinking | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Pamela Ryan's insight:

Very useful insights he re

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela Ryan
Scoop.it!

The relationship between language and culture for Sherpa speakers –

The relationship between language and culture for Sherpa speakers – | futures thinking | Scoop.it
Lauren Gawne writes: Given that the average PhD thesis would take a full day to read aloud, it’s no mean feat for a research student to distill the importance of their work into just a couple of minutes.
Pamela Ryan's insight:

Such a good idea

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela Ryan
Scoop.it!

Don't Call Them Textbooks - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Don't Call Them Textbooks - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education | futures thinking | Scoop.it
Publishers' latest digital products may deserve a category of their own.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pamela Ryan
Scoop.it!

Experiences from Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and how the MOOC could potentially increase diversity, social inclusion & learner engagement

Experiences from Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and how the MOOC could potentially increase diversity, social inclusion & learner engagement | futures thinking | Scoop.it
Background There is currently much interest and excitement at the emergence of an educational approach commonly termed the ‘Massive Open Online Course’ or MOOC. These MOOCs are truly global in thei...
Pamela Ryan's insight:

This is the most comprehensive account of MOOCs published. Very useful.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from Connectivism
Scoop.it!

Reflection on Connectivism: My Mind Map Reflection

Reflection on Connectivism: My Mind Map Reflection | futures thinking | Scoop.it
My network has drastically changed the way I learn.  I used to learn by reading as many scholarly sources as I could find about a particular topic.  Then I would form an opinion and move to the nex...
Via Susan Bainbridge
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
Scoop.it!

The Hobbit's amazing transformations

The Hobbit's amazing transformations | futures thinking | Scoop.it

NZ Herald:  "Peter Jackson's award-winning hair and make-up team have been behind some remarkable transformations over the years. Their work on the hobbits, elves and 13-strong crew of dwarves in The Hobbit is among their most impressive to date."


DRC:  This article is illustrated with some fun interactive graphics.


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from Education Technologies | Scoop.it
Scoop.it!

Top 29 Best Ways to Stay Creative in Life Inspirational

Top 29 Best Ways to Stay Creative in Life Inspirational | futures thinking | Scoop.it

 

What are the steps you usually follow to be more creative than the rest? As of what i know, creativity is not something which comes automatically. Or else, you can also say Exploring or doing Research is actually another name of Creativity. Creativity is not bound to happen suddenly, infact it’s an art which many people have failed to understand miserably and thus have gone into losses. Creativity comes out when we try to research for something or start exploring on a concept, this is where a new idea gets born and thus the growth of creativity initialize.

 


Via Susan Bainbridge, Luciana Viter, Paulo Tomás Neves, Arthur Correia
more...
Elisa Vivancos's comment, December 22, 2012 12:46 AM
http://allinfographics.org/top-29-best-ways-to-stay-creative-in-life-inspirational
Kathy Jordan's curator insight, February 10, 2013 8:27 AM

I need motivation to stay creative and this infographic by @all_infographic is a winner.

Ana Gea's curator insight, March 19, 2013 6:03 PM

Most importantly- Have fun & Finish something. 

Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

Napster, Udacity, and the Academy | Clay Shirky

"The fight over MOOCs isn’t about the value of college; a good chunk of the four thousand institutions you haven’t heard of provide an expensive but mediocre education."

 

Comments: longish piece but a very good read. Bottom line: make sure universities and colleges don't go the way the music industry went when they saw mp3 coming and yet choose to ignore it. MOOCs are a serious threat (and opportunity).

 

Clay Shirky starts with the mp3 story and Napster, then introduces MOOCs as a similar phenomenon. They are similar in that they also beat the 'cost disease': education doesn't scale well, thus becoming ever more expensive relative to products and services that do scale (anything that can be mass produced, cars, computers, but not musical performances). He then goes on to point out that the Harvards of this world have deep enough pockets to be safe. Indeed, for them MOOCs are a marketing instrument. The institutions that should be worried are the non-ivy-league universities, some of which apparantly are better at producing loan defaults than graduates. Even qualitywise, not just in terms of price, MOOCs might offer a beter educational experience than these instutions. And he concludes by saying that "In the academy, we lecture other people every day about learning from history. Now its our turn, and the risk is that we’ll be the last to know that the world has changed, because we can’t imagine—really cannot imagine—that story we tell ourselves about ourselves could start to fail. Even when it’s true. Especially when it’s true." (peter sloep, @pbsloep; thanks Seb Schmoller for alerting me to this)


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's comment, November 14, 2012 1:52 AM
Found it good article too. The situation in the US is much worse than I suspected. Actually, MOOCs start to make sense then. That also points to the weaker part of the article. Although we should of course learn from the past, what is the lesson to be learnt? Shirky suggests to avoid MOOCs, but may be we only need to make sure they are not run by venture capital.
plerudulier's comment, November 14, 2012 3:47 AM
this, to me, resembles the proprietary application vs free version situation, Apple or Microsoft vs linux.
Peter B. Sloep's comment, November 14, 2012 1:30 PM
@plerudulier I agree, there are similarities. If you want to explore what the open source movement could have to offer to open content, read Steven Weber's the success of open source. Although it is only about open source, it has got many valuable lessons.
Scooped by Pamela Ryan
Scoop.it!

The End of Education As We Know It

The End of Education As We Know It | futures thinking | Scoop.it
Scott Barry Kaufman Imagine being 6 or 7 years old again, learning about addition and subtraction for the first time.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

How In-Person Meetups Are Fixing The Problem With MOOCs | WiredAcademic | Paul Glader

"That’s the kind of long-term impact MOOCs could have if they begin to be connected and blended with in-person groups – meetups, libraries, community center learning centers, school study halls. Adding a “third place” for MOOCs goes beyond beating the isolation of online learning. Such a practice could also provide natural places for monitoring and proctoring of MOOC courses and exams, meaning MOOC-participating institutions could go a step closer to granting college credit for the courses."

Comment: a new take on MOOCs, not as a replacement for regular university education, but as catalyser of local groups who jointly work on the MOOC's assignment, but also start doing their own thing. Apparantly, this is a widespread thing already. The author feels this is back to university education as it started: students getting together and organising their own professors! (Peter Sloep, @pbsloep)
Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from Hybrid Pedagogy Reading List
Scoop.it!

Do ‘the Risky Thing’ for Open Access » Roger T. Whitson, Ph.D

Do ‘the Risky Thing’ for Open Access » Roger T. Whitson, Ph.D | futures thinking | Scoop.it

A little over a year ago, Kathleen Fitzpatrick wrote “Do ‘the Risky Thing’ in Digital Humanities,” in which she recounted a graduate student who asked about whether she should do a digital project for her dissertation or something more conservative. Fitzpatrick responded “Do the risky thing,” but qualified it with “[m]ake sure that someone’s got your back, but do the risky thing.”


Via Hybrid Pedagogy
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pamela Ryan from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

MOOCS: 12 Reasons for universities not to panic by Paul

MOOCS: 12 Reasons for universities not to panic by Paul | futures thinking | Scoop.it
Don’t believe the hype? There has been an extraordinary level of hype in higher education (and beyond) about Massive Open Online Courses or MOOCs. Vice-Chancellors and their senior management...

 

Comment: blog post that urges university management not to panic over the advent of xMOOCs. Paul mentions 12 reasons, all well know, but the force of the argument is in their listing them one below the other: no business model, no credits, no quality assurance, no standards ... Interesting is also his point that, without universities, we could not have MOOCs (who would create the content for it?), effectively invalidating Sebastian Thrun's argument that there is room for 10 universities only (I am not sure, however, whether Thrun means in the world or in the US). Remarkable is Paul's assurance that if the Open University doesn't panic, there is no reason for other universities to do so. Who after all would be in a better position to assess the reality of the MOOC threat?

However, we should not be complacent either. If so many people sign up for a MOOC, they do something right and regular universities something wrong. Interestingly, this is exactly the reasion why Harvard set up EdX, the not-for-profit xMOOC they maintain (see my blog about Katie Vale below: How to improve teaching with technologies). One of the things MOOCs seem to do right is increasing accessibility. Luckily, this is attempted by many more than just the MOOCers. The UNESCO supported movement for Open Educational Resources, begun with the MIT Open Courseware initiative and expanded since then to encompass many more universities, also tries to do this. So even to the admonition not to be complacent, people have already reacted. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
No comment yet.