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Revenue Is This Quarter, Culture Is The Future

Revenue Is This Quarter, Culture Is The Future | Future of Work | Scoop.it

It is worth putting extra thought and effort in building the culture that is more than just a poster on the wall. Here are 7 things to consider when building the culture of impact and creativity.

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Tony Brugman (Bright & Company)'s curator insight, May 3, 2014 4:53 PM

Learn from this Zappos-like ad-agency (Swift), where people thrive and really can make a difference! Their company values “Swiftology” spans everything from their work ethic to their choice in snacks.


A quick peek at a small selection of their values:

They believe:

* It all starts with a great story

* The best idea can come from anywhere

* In the Power of every person

* Where we work creates great work


Gary Johnsen's curator insight, May 15, 2014 9:47 AM

Culture is key

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About Future of Work

About Future of Work | Future of Work | Scoop.it


                                                 ★★★★★


I believe that knowledge is everything. Knowledge is ideas. Knowledge is power. Knowledge is hope. 

But only if it is shared and applied.


That is why I created Future of Work on Scoop.it. My personal aim is to provide you with stories you can learn and grow from. The kind of stories that provokes personal reflection and constructive action. 

I'm co-founder of FutureShifts, a consultancy that helps visionary companies identify and tackle the big shifts in the world by cultivating the skills, mindsets, behaviors and organizational cultures needed to succeed in times of change.


You're welcome to connect via: 

 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/kennethmikkelsen

Google+: https://plus.google.com/+KennethMikkelsen

Twitter: www.twitter.com/LeadershipABC

 

I hope you'll be inspired.

 

Enjoy!

 

Kenneth

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The Cult of Work You Never Meant to Join

The Cult of Work You Never Meant to Join | Future of Work | Scoop.it

Are our most valuable qualities being exploited at work? How our strengths get twisted into forming bad habits that — if we don’t change fast — just might kill us.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

A fine story about the Overkill Cult by Jason Lengstorf.


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Workforce 2020: The Looming Talent Crisis

The importance of people management is not reflected in the C-suite and boardroom. Many companies lack the culture and tools they need to engage employees, track their performance, and measure the effectiveness of HR initiatives. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Preparing for the 2020 workforce is critical to business strategy, growth, and performance. To understand the challenges and opportunities, Oxford Economics and SAP surveyed over 2,700 executives and more than 2,700 employees in 27 countries during the second quarter of 2014. 


Here are the key findings from the survey: 


The New Face of Work

Businesses must understand the workforce of the future and its importance to bottom-line success.


The 2020 Workforce will be increasingly flexible.

  • 83% of executives surveyed said they plan to increase use of contingent, intermittent, or consultant employees in the next 3 years forcing change on companies.


The 2020 Workforce will be increasingly diverse.

  • HR management will need to become more evidence-based to deal with these realities.


A lack of metrics and tools keeps HR from developing strategies for building the future workforce.

  • Most lack sufficient data on their strengths and vulnerabilities, and do not use quantifiable metrics and benchmarking in workforce development.
  • Only 42% say they know how to extract meaningful insights from the data available to them.

As a result, companies are not making progress toward meeting their workforce goals.
  • Nearly one-fifth of executives say they have made slight progress; 47% say they have made moderate progress; and just 33% say they have made good or significant progress.

HR too often lacks the information or insights to be truly strategic.
  • HR often works with the C-suite but does not drive board-level strategy.

  • Companies are executing on operational plans but lack strategic vision for the workforce.

The Millennial Misunderstanding

Millennials are different, but not as different as companies think.


Several myths about Millennials are challenged by the research, including:

  • Millennials care more about making a positive difference in the world through work.

  • Achieving work/life balance is more important to Millennials.

  • Finding personal meaning in their work is more important to Millennials.

  • Meeting income goals is less important to Millennials as long as they are learning and growing.

Millennials do need be managed differently, in terms of feedback and development.
  • Millennials rely more on formal training and mentoring to develop their skills.
  • Millennials want informal feedback from their managers 50% more often than older peers.


What Matters Most at Work

Companies do not understand what their employees really want from them.

When it comes to satisfied employees, compensation matters—a lot.

  • The most important attraction and retention benefit for employees is compensation.

  • Only 39% of executives say their company offers competitive compensation; other corporate offerings often fail to match up with employee preferences.

  • Just 39% of survey respondents say they are satisfied with their job overall.


Executives value loyalty more than job performance.

  • Despite this preference, they are not focused on effective ways to engender loyalty.

  • Employees have a distorted view of the qualities their bosses deem most important. The top three attributes executives want in employees are a high level of education and/or institutional training (33%), loyalty and long-term commitment 32%), and the ability to learn and be trained quickly (31%). The top three attributes employees think their leadership desire are the ability to learn and be trained quickly (34%), loyalty and long-term commitment (31%), and job performance and results (31%).


The Leadership Cliff

Executives and employees agree that leadership is lacking - and leadership development is lacking.

Gaps in leadership capabilities spell trouble for future growth.
  • Executives cite a lack of adequate leadership as a major impediment to achieving workforce goals; only 35% say talent now in leadership positions is sufficient to drive global growth.
  • About half of executives say their team has the skills to manage talent or to inspire and empower employees; leadership is not equipped to lead a global, diverse workforce.

Employees agree with executives that leadership overall is lackluster.
  • Just 44% of employees say that leadership at their company can lead the organization to success; even fewer say their company is committed to diversity.

  • Ratings across a range of leadership attributes are middling at best.
  • Employees don’t cite direct manager quality as something that would improve their engagement, suggesting that upper-level quality should be improvement focus.


Most companies are not cultivating leadership within their organizations.

  • Planning for succession and continuity in key roles is not common.

  • Few employees or executives say management values leadership ability in employees.

Bridging the Skills Gap: The Learning Mandate

Better training and education opportunities would benefit employees and businesses alike.


For employees, obsolescence is a bigger concern than layoffs.

  • Employees say their top concern is their position changing or becoming obsolete.

  • Millennials are dissatisfied with options for development and a clear career path.


Technology skills development will continue to lag.
  • The need for technology skills will grow over the next three years, especially in analytics and programming/development. 48% say analytics skills will be needed by employees in three years, and 59% say programming/development skills will be needed.

  • Ample training on essential technology is in short supply, as is access to the latest technology.


Firms have difficulty finding skilled employees, but invest little in developing their own people.

  • Nearly half of executives say difficulty finding base-level skills affects their workforce strategy.

  • An increase in the number of non-payroll positions may force new thinking on development.


Firms struggle to develop a learning culture within their organization.

  • Roughly half of executives say their company is capable of retaining, updating, and sharing institutional knowledge,

    and 47% say their company has a culture of continuous learning.

  • Only 41% of employees say their company offers them opportunities to expand their skill sets. 

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5 Myths of Great Workplaces

5 Myths of Great Workplaces | Future of Work | Scoop.it

In recent years, scientists in a variety of fields have begun investigating the conditions that allow people to work more successfully.


A look at the research calls some popular assumptions into question.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Consider these five “great workplace” myths:


Myth 1: Everyone Is Incessantly Happy

Myth 2: Conflict Is  Rare

Myth 3: Mistakes Are Few

Myth 4: Hire for Cultural Fit

Myth 5: Offices Are Full of Fun Things


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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 7, 8:52 AM
Some great insights worth reviewing. What do you think?
Cass Tindall's curator insight, March 16, 8:43 PM

Have you noticed that some people are overly happy about work? Or there is hardly any arguing at work? You may think these are signs of a great workplace, but researchers have found that this isn’t the case. We become more gullible and tend to be tolerable of risks when we are overly happy. Some people cannot work at a place where there are no negative emotions, it bring them into negative emotions themselves. These can include embarrassment and shame, which then bring people to crack and lose control of their emotions.

 With no arguments at work, it seems as though everyone is happy with decisions being made and just follow the crowd. It shows that people are tense and so is their relationship, they distract parties from doing their jobs; however it is quite the opposite. It fuels people to become better at their job and honestly, bosses want their staff to challenge them and other employees. Healthy debates encourage others to think outside the square and get others’ opinions on the good and bad of their work. It also improves the relationships of employees and their employers, as it shows that you are willing to fight for something that you believe is right or something you disagree with and it needs to be changed.

I do believe that arguments and being emotional is the key to having a good workplace and success. You want people to challenge you and give you their opinions on the topics at hand. If you want a good workplace, you need to encourage people to challenge you, show you their true opinions and show their love for the job. Think about it – better workplace, better profits, pay rises, true and honest employees. Encouragement is all it takes. 

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Millennials Want to Be Coached at Work

Millennials Want to Be Coached at Work | Future of Work | Scoop.it

What millennials want most from their managers isn’t more managerial direction, per se, but more help with their own personal development.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Millennials crave — and respond to — a good, positive coach, who can make all the difference in their success.



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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 7, 8:54 AM

What do you offer in terms of coaching? Do you know how to coach well? Would be worth bringing it a coach to learn the process correctly.

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Major Trends Altering the Workplace Landscape

Major Trends Altering the Workplace Landscape | Future of Work | Scoop.it

Where will work be in the future? And where will workers be? The economic, social, and technological landscape is shifting rapidly. Here are some of the major trends altering the future workplace.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Among the many broad trends affecting the future workplace and workers are:


  • More workplace flexibility will be demanded by new highly skilled workers, but most workers will also accept the need to work longer total hours.
  • The “workplace” for any given job is likely to continue to spread over multiple time zones or continents, with workers connecting through a growing range of media channels.
  • There will be a greater premium placed on knowledge workers who ask constructive questions concerning an employer’s mission, as well as their customers, market values, desired results, and evolving marketing and business plans.
  • Workers and managers will focus more on simplifying workloads versus just getting it all done, which reduces the risk of missing critical innovation opportunities.
  • Managers will promote health and wellness programs that focus on helping workers quit smoking, lose weight, or deal with depression, because healthy employees are more productive and miss fewer days because of poor health.
  • Employers will embrace less-expensive employee recruiting through social networks (this reached 94% of employers this last year, reports Jobvite.com). And hirers are relying more on critical thinking skills tests like the Collegiate Learning Assessment, rather than on just college grades and degrees to assess candidates.
  • More than 75% of U.S. employees are almost continuously looking for work while employed, and they hold nearly a dozen different jobs on average before age 35.
  • Employers are using personal reputation (strong track records) to make hiring decisions and 75% of jobseekers are using company “brand” in the same way, even accepting a lower salary to work with a desired firm.
  • Approximately one-third of Americans in the workforce (17 million workers) are freelance contractors and consultants. This means more people working from home without employer-sponsored health-care benefits.
  • And 30% of U.S. workers are on flextime when working from home (or other locations) two to three days a week. As well, some studies have found increased productivity of as much as 15%–20% for these flextime workers.
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 12, 4:06 PM

Read Mikkelsen's summary by clicking on the red "Reactions" below.  There's a lot there.   A good deal of it reminds me of 20th century industrial age corporatism.

An alternative is this: 


Change in the Nature of Work: The Case For "Antiwork" and the 20 hour Work Week 


 for these reasons:    

"...we see the persistent belief that we can achieve 'full employment.' Rifkin showed empirically that this is nonsense, unless we create a lot of make-work, i.e., work for the sake of working. And that’s what, as a society, we seem to be doing. Everywhere you look there are stupid, pointless (and probably environmentally destructive) jobs."

~  Deb

 

Nedko Aldev's curator insight, February 14, 1:04 PM

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Fast Forward 2030

Fast Forward 2030 | Future of Work | Scoop.it

The ideas, trends, and behaviors that will shape work and workplace in 2030 are already perceptible today. Some are clearly evident whilst others are emerging quietly around us. In this study, 220 experts, business leaders and young people from Asia, Europe, and North America shared their views on how these trends will impact business, evolve work practices and continue to revolutionize how, when, and where work happens. 



Via Ron McIntyre, David Hain
Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

In 2030, the many places where we work and live will be diverse and entwined: humanity, creativity, culture, and community will be integral. The research demonstrates that significant changes are happening – across the world. Not only is business changing, but people are reflecting on the very meaning of work in their lives and how to be a part of vibrant virtual and physical communities that bring joy and high quality of experience to their lives.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, January 29, 10:59 AM

Are you ready? At 68 years old some consider me over the hill and out of touch but I totally agree with this assessment of the future workplace. I embrace these changes coming and recommend that you reflect on them. Yes, there will be deviations but many of these have already started. Would love to discuss them with you if you have any doubts.

David Hain's curator insight, January 29, 11:43 AM

2030 sounds good! Trends predicted here.

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Building a Culture: You Need to Harness the Value of Core Values

Building a Culture: You Need to Harness the Value of Core Values | Future of Work | Scoop.it

Core values are traits or qualities that represent deeply held beliefs. They reflect what is important to us, and what motivates us.


In an organization, values define what it stands for and how it is seen and experienced by all stakeholders (customers, employees, service partners, suppliers and communities).


In this organizational context, values are moving from a PR exercise to become the guiding compass, not only for progressive, enlightened organizations but for more well established corporates too.


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The Workforce Crisis of 2030 - and How to Start Solving It Now

The Workforce Crisis of 2030 - and How to Start Solving It Now | Future of Work | Scoop.it

It sounds counterintuitive, but by 2030, many of the world's largest economies will have more jobs than adult citizens to do those jobs. In this data-filled -- and quite charming -- talk, human resources expert Rainer Strack suggests that countries ought to look across borders for mobile and willing job seekers. But to do that, they need to start by changing the culture in their businesses.


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Mapping the Future: The Future of Work

Mapping the Future: The Future of Work | Future of Work | Scoop.it

Technology is enabling us to achieve remarkable things, yet it’s rendering many jobs obsolete. How will the world of work change over the next 50 years? Andrew MacAfee, Principal Research Scientist for the Initiative on the Digital Economy at the MIT Sloan School of Management, explores the possibilities ahead.


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Motivating Employees Takes Culture, Peer Recognition, Going the Extra Mile

Motivating Employees Takes Culture, Peer Recognition, Going the Extra Mile | Future of Work | Scoop.it

What motivates employees?


Is it money? Feeling valued at work? Connecting with a company’s social mission?


All these are good answers, but a new Tinypulse survey from TinyHR titled The 7 Key Trends Impacting Today’s Workplace that analyzed over 200,000 employee responses relating to organizational culture found that “peers and camaraderie” are the No. 1 reason employees go the extra mile.

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The Evolution Of Managers

The Evolution Of Managers | Future of Work | Scoop.it

There’s a constant debate around whether we need more managers or more leaders. Sadly this is a fruitless debate that artificially pits the two against each other. When thinking about the future of work managers MUST be leaders. That is, they are placed in a position of power because they have earned followers, thought leadership, and respect. If a manager is simply placed in a position of power because they are able to bring in the most money or are experts at delegating then they will fail. It’s time we stop referring to managers and leaders as two separate people. If you haven’t earned leadership then you shouldn’t be a manager.


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Why You Hate Work

Why You Hate Work | Future of Work | Scoop.it

The way we’re working isn’t working. Even if you’re lucky enough to have a job, you’re probably not very excited to get to the office in the morning, you don’t feel much appreciated while you’re there, you find it difficult to get your most important work accomplished, amid all the distractions, and you don’t believe that what you’re doing makes much of a difference anyway. By the time you get home, you’re pretty much running on empty, and yet still answering emails until you fall asleep.


Increasingly, this experience is common not just to middle managers, but also to top executives.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Excessive demands are leading to burnout everywhere.

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Stephen Dale's curator insight, December 8, 2014 5:14 AM

The way people feel at work profoundly influences how they perform. This study revealed just how much impact companies can have when they meet each of the four core needs of their employees:

 

o Renewal: Employees who take a break every 90 minutes report a 30 percent higher level of focus than those who take no breaks or just one during the day. 

o Value: Feeling cared for by one’s supervisor has a more significant impact on people’s sense of trust and safety than any other behavior by a leader. 

o Focus: Only 20 percent of respondents said they were able to focus on one task at a time at work, but those who could were 50 percent.

o Purpose: Employees who derive meaning and significance from their work were more than three times as likely to stay with their organisations engaged.

 

Reading time: 10mins

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Re-imagining the Future of Work

Re-imagining the Future of Work | Future of Work | Scoop.it

Imagine that it’s 2025 and the world of work has changed. Today, we do labour out of passion, not obligation. Nobody has a low-paid job or has to balance multiple jobs just to make rent. Work gives us meaning and direction, but it does not define who we are. The three day working week means we have time to spend with friends and family, to contribute to our communities and have a say in how society in run.



Via jean lievens
Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

An extract from Resist! Against a precarious future, a new book on young people and politics. 


Buy the book or download a free PDF copy here: http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/books/archive/resist.html.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 5, 11:43 AM

Some great insights in this but remember it is IBM centric. Well worth reading for all leaders.

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Future of Work: Culture

The explosion of new technologies, mass adoption of social channels, ubiquity of mobile and connectivity, and proliferation of devices continue to drive massive transformation, but at what cost? How can large organizations collaborate, integrate, and innovate quickly enough to survive at the speed of their customers? What are the questions we could or should be asking to really make changes for work that make sense?

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From Looking Digital to Being Digital: The Impact of Technology on the Future of Work

Companies are finding it challenging to capture the full value of revolutionary breakthroughs in digital technology. Many have used digital technology to drive down costs and become more efficient, which is akin to “looking digital,” an important but surface-level change. Some, however, are taking things further and transforming data into new revenue and new sources of value.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

To move from looking digital to being digital, companies must engage in a deep shift in the way they do business. For business leaders, that shift requires as much attention to culture and organization as it does to the technology itself.


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Gary Bamford's curator insight, March 12, 2:45 AM

The future is agile not orange....

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Global Human Capital Trends 2015

In today’s world, the barrier between work and life has all but disappeared, the balance of power in the employer-employee relationship has shifted, and Millennial demands are now driving much of workplace culture. HR and talent teams can’t afford to stay stuck on business as usual.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The Deloitte 2015 Global Human Capital Trends report makes the case for a new HR playbook — one that taps HR to be more agile, forward thinking, and bolder in its solutions. The report involved surveys and interviews with more than 3,300 business and HR leaders from 106 countries. Among the findings:


  • The gap is widening between what business leaders want and what HR is delivering.
  • Engagement and culture skyrocketed to the no. 1 issue around the world, with 87 percent of companies rating it important or very important vs. 79 percent last year.
  • Half the respondents rated their leadership shortfalls as "very important," while only 31 percent believe their leadership pipeline is “ready.”
  • Learning and development issues exploded, rising from the no. 8 to the no. 3 most important talent challenge in this year’s study, yet despite this demand, capabilities in learning dropped significantly.
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Emerging World's curator insight, March 5, 1:21 AM


The just-released Deloitte 2015 Global Human Capital Trends report makes the case for a new HR playbook — one that taps HR to be more agile, forward thinking, and bolder in its solutions.  The report involved surveys and interviews with more than 3,300 business and HR leaders from 106 countries. Among the findings:


  • The gap is widening between what business leaders want and what HR is delivering.


  • Engagement and culture skyrocketed to the no. 1 issue around the world, with 87 percent of companies rating it important or very important vs. 79 percent last year.
  • Half the respondents rated their leadership shortfalls as “very important,” while only 31 percent believe their leadership pipeline is "ready."


  • Learning and development issues exploded, rising from the no. 8 to the no. 3 most important talent challenge in this year's study, yet despite this demand, capabilities in learning dropped significantly


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The Alternative Futures of Work

The Alternative Futures of Work | Future of Work | Scoop.it

While we cannot fully predict the future, we can imagine it and prepare. When we think about the future it is natural to think about events that are a continuation of today; these are the probable futures. But surprising futures, initiated by unforeseen events, are also possible and as such are worth our consideration.


In this piece Frog Design explores the implications of several alternative futures on the workplace and the workforce.



Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Predicting how surprising future scenarios might impact a worker’s needs.


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Daniel Egger's curator insight, February 21, 3:17 PM

The main implications lie in the way of how our day-by-day life is organized. With the listed changes affecting the work structure, we lead with an increasing flexibility and uncertainty in income. Our consumption patterns as well the fix costs however have to change, new financial solutions created.  Beside those increasing uncertainties in the workforce, living patterns, family structures, romantic relationships, and perception of success will dramatically challenge  our emotional balance affecting directly our well-being

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 7, 8:57 AM

Some very interesting concepts presented here. How do you think they could affect the workplace?

Tessa Dagnely's curator insight, March 8, 8:24 AM

Nous sommes tous concernés par tout ce que le futur nous réserve, ce que  nous aurons prévu et préparé et ce qui nous échappera.

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The Deloitte Millennial Survey 2015

Findings from Deloitte's fourth annual Millennial Survey show that business, particularly in developed markets, will need to make significant changes to attract and retain the future workforce.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Deloitte surveyed 7,800 of tomorrow's leaders, from 29 countries, on effective leadership and how business operates and impacts society.


  • Millennials overwhelmingly believe (75 percent) businesses are focused on their own agendas rather than helping to improve society.
  • Only 28 percent of Millennials feel that their current organization is making full use of their skills.
  • More than half (53 percent) aspire to become the leader or most senior executive within their current organization, with a clear ambition gap between Millennials in emerging markets and developed markets.
  • Sixty-five percent of emerging-market based Millennials said they would like to achieve this goal, compared to only 38 percent in developed markets. This figure was also higher among men.
  • Additionally, the survey found large global businesses have less appeal for Millennials in developed markets (35 percent) compared to emerging markets (51 percent).
  • Developed-market based Millennials are also less inclined (11 percent) than Millennials in emerging markets (22 percent) to start their own business.
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There’s an app for that

There’s an app for that | Future of Work | Scoop.it

Freelance workers available at a moment’s notice will reshape the nature of companies and the structure of careers.


Excellent article on the rise of the 1099 economy. Freelancers unite. 



Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The on-demand economy will inevitably exacerbate the trend towards enforced self-reliance that has been gathering pace since the 1970s. Workers who want to progress will have to keep their formal skills up to date, rather than relying on the firm to train them (or to push them up the ladder regardless). This means accepting challenging assignments or, if they are locked in a more routine job, taking responsibility for educating themselves. They will also have to learn how to drum up new business and make decisions between spending and investment.

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It's Official: Micromanaging Kills Productivity

It's Official: Micromanaging Kills Productivity | Future of Work | Scoop.it

New research suggests the more you try to dictate how and when employees work, the less they will accomplish.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Contrary to the instinct of micromanagers everywhere, watching over your employees' shoulders and dictating where and when they should work is perhaps the worst tactic for productivity. 


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As Robots Grow Smarter, American Workers Struggle to Keep Up

As Robots Grow Smarter, American Workers Struggle to Keep Up | Future of Work | Scoop.it

Concern about technology — the printing press, the steam engine or the computer — supplanting humans is not new. But this time may be different.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Mr. Brynjolfsson and other experts believe that society has a chance to meet the challenge in ways that will allow technology to be mostly a positive force. In addition to making some jobs obsolete, new technologies have also long complemented people’s skills and enabled them to be more productive – as the Internet and word processing have for office workers or robotic surgery has for surgeons.


Excellent article on the future of work and the implications of the rise of the machines.

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Managing a 24/7 digital workforce

Managing a 24/7 digital workforce | Future of Work | Scoop.it

Digitisation is a megatrend that will affect all of us. Employees are operating anywhere, anytime, on any device and challenging the status quo of traditional workplaces. In particular, we look at how digitisation affects employee engagement and how businesses need to adapt.


The benefits are clear: more flexibility and more adaptability equals more wellbeing. Technological advances mean we can overcome traditional barriers imposed by geography, time and IT access. We can all become more efficient and work in a way that suits our lifestyles. I’m a big advocate.


However, with the benefits comes a clear warning. There is a danger that ‘always on’ may mean we are never off. Stress, burnout and a general deterioration of wellbeing are the undesired but very real consequences of digitisation. 



Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Amid ‘digitisation’, how can companies manage the always on culture and ensure that employees switch off?


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The 7 Principles Of The Future Employee

The 7 Principles Of The Future Employee | Future of Work | Scoop.it

These are the 7 Principles of The Future Employee. This is how work will get done over the next few years and it has already started in many organizations around the world.


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The 10 Principles Of The Future Manager

The 10 Principles Of The Future Manager | Future of Work | Scoop.it

When it comes to the future of work it’s not just employees that are changing, managers are also having to change the ways in which they lead and in fact are HAVING to become leaders. These are 10 core principles or characteristics that managers will and must possess going forward.


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The Future of Work and the Transformation from Within

Which companies are ensuring their place in the future?

 

Definitely not those sticking to conventional models in work organisation or in structuring and running their businesses. As evolution teaches, the ability to adapt to environmental changes, such as the ones we experience in the corporate world, determines who has a better chance of thriving.


So, is your company’s DNA set to evolve?

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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:17 PM

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