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Valve - Handbook For New Employees

There's a lot of hype these days about Zappos and their endeavor to short circuit a top-down hierarchy and distribute power more evenly.


But you should check out Valve. The Silicon Valley game maker has operates without a traditional management structure and no formal titles.


Here's Valve’s handbook for new employees.... 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

You should also read this article about Valve from The New York Times: Game Maker Without a Rule Book.



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If robots are the future of work, where do humans fit in?

If robots are the future of work, where do humans fit in? | Work Futures | Scoop.it

We need to rethink our view of jobs and leisure – and quickly, if we are to avoid becoming obsolete.

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The question of how to distribute wealth in the future curves back round to meet a conundrum raised by the past: how do we remake the social safety net so that it embodies solidarity, generosity and trust, rather than the welfare state of the present, rickety with the woodworm of mutual suspicion.

 

 

 

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How To Avoid Being Replaced By A Robot

How To Avoid Being Replaced By A Robot | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Your job will probably be affected by automation, but the future isn't as bleak as it seems. Here's 5 steps to remain relevant and employed.

 

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

If history is our guide, job displacement from smart machines jobs simply means that knowledge workers must learn how to adapt, similar to how civilization successfully transitioned from an agricultural to an industrial society. They must learn how to supplement and enhance their skills.

 

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Quit Your Job

Quit Your Job | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Research indicates that having a sense of purpose is a powerful predictor of mental and physical robustness. A midlife career shift can be good for cognition, well-being, and even longevity.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center have found that a third of people whose brains, upon autopsy, display the plaques and tangles of Alzheimer’s never exhibited memory loss or intellectual impairment. The best predictor of whether someone would escape these symptoms was whether they felt strongly that they had a purpose in life. Those who did were two and a half times as likely to be unafflicted as those who didn’t.

 

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Ricard Lloria's curator insight, March 13, 5:46 AM

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center have found that a third of people whose brains, upon autopsy, display the plaques and tangles of Alzheimer’s never exhibited memory loss or intellectual impairment. The best predictor of whether someone would escape these symptoms was whether they felt strongly that they had a purpose in life. Those who did were two and a half times as likely to be unafflicted as those who didn’t.

 

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Lessons From a Silicon Valley Maverick: New Ways of Working and Collaborating

Heading up HR at Netflix, Patty McCord experienced the unconventional start-up work cultures of Silicon Valley up close. She has made a close study of what makes these new cultures work and offers some surprising insights into how deceptively traditional some of these eccentric new offices still are.

 

Finally she introduces some challenging new ideas on how to motivate people, develop talent, build trust, and ultimately create dynamic and thriving businesses anyplace, and in any industry.

 

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What is the Future of Your Job?

What is the Future of Your Job? | Work Futures | Scoop.it

The World Economic Forum’s Future of Jobs report seeks to understand the current and future impact of key disruptions on employment levels, skill sets and recruitment patterns in different industries and countries. It does so by asking the talent and strategy executives of today’s largest employers to imagine how jobs in their industry will change up to the year 2020.

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Unless employers and employees act today, the threat of automation and a jobless future could become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

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The Future of Jobs

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is interacting with other socio-economic and demographic factors to create a perfect storm of business model change in all industries, resulting in major disruptions to labour markets.

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

New categories of jobs will emerge, partly or wholly displacing others. The skill sets required in both old and new occupations will change in most industries and transform how and where people work. It may also affect female and male workers differently and transform the dynamics of the industry gender gap. The Future of Jobs Report aims to unpack and provide specific information on the relative magnitude of these trends by industry and geography, and on the expected time horizon for their impact to be felt on job functions, employment levels and skills.

 

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A World without Work?

A World without Work? | Work Futures | Scoop.it

 

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is upon us. How will it affect our jobs? 

 

The economist John Maynard Keynes predicted that by 2030 we would only work three hours a day because machines would be doing our jobs for us. However, he also recognised that work gives our lives meaning and brings stability to societies. So the question above is much bigger than “are we going to be unemployed?” It’s also about how technological progress will revolutionize the world of work. 

 

Meanwhile, we are living longer, healthier lives, which – with the spending power of those over the age of 60 expected to rise to $15 trillion by 2020 - is an opportunity for economies.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

How will rapid technological progress and the prospect of longer, healthier lives revolutionize work?

 

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Alphanought Design's curator insight, January 21, 8:19 AM

 

I think I could keep myself entertained the world is full of so much to learn it would be amazing to have the time to learn it I think I could keep myself entertained the world is full of so much to learn it would be amazing to have the time to learn it 

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How The Generation Born Today Will Shape The Future Of Work

How The Generation Born Today Will Shape The Future Of Work | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Longer life expectancies and changing demographics mean potential clashes between more generations in the workplace.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

By 2020, 40% of the population will be racial minorities, and more than half of the population under 18 will be racial minorities, adding that by 2023, whites will total less than half of the U.S. population under 30. Overall, this new minority demographic is estimated to comprise 56% of the total U.S. population by 2060, compared with 38% in 2014, as reported by NPR.

 

What this all means from a workforce perspective is that as baby boomers filter out of jobs into retirement and gradually lose their social and business-oriented dominance, jobs will need to be filled within the hierarchy of business and industry by younger, exceedingly multiracial workers.

 

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What the rise of the freelance economy means for the future of work

What the rise of the freelance economy means for the future of work | Work Futures | Scoop.it

With the right institutions and policies in place, it could become more viable for people to choose a freelance career path. Workers in many fields are becoming free agents in digital marketplaces, for better and for worse.

 

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

As digital marketplaces offer individuals new avenues for generating income, their numbers could grow sharply in the decade ahead. These platforms are creating flexible opportunities for individuals who want to be free agents, but they are raising real concerns about the insecurity associated with the so-called "gig economy."

 

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Five Ways Work Will Change in the Future

Five Ways Work Will Change in the Future | Work Futures | Scoop.it

A peek into a world where your boss is tracking you, your neighbour is a robot, and it’s cool to be old… employment, but not as we know it.

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The way we are working is changing fast and traditional career paths look less and less relevant. This story is part of The Guardian's series on the future of work that  examine emerging models and ask what's to celebrate, what's to fear.

 

This article looks at five trends: 

 

1 | Workplace structures

2 | Artificial intelligence

3 | The human cloud

4 | Workplace monitoring

5 | The end of retirement

 

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6 Ways Work Will Change In 2016

6 Ways Work Will Change In 2016 | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Large organizations today are under greater threat of disruption, requiring early adoption and a heightened awareness of the surrounding business environment.


Here are some of the workplace trends that are expected to have far-reaching effects in 2016, from the boardrooms of Fortune 500 companies to the home offices, cafes, and coworking spaces of the freelance economy.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Workplace trends for 2016 will be set in large part by what's happening in the freelance world right now.

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Borges’ Map: Navigating a World of Digital Disruption

Borges’ Map: Navigating a World of Digital Disruption | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Digital disruption is not a new phenomenon. But the opportunities and risks it presents shift over time. Competitive advantage flows to the businesses that see and act on those shifts first. We are entering the third, and most consequential, wave of digital disruption. It has profound implications not only for strategy but also for the structures of companies and industries. Business leaders need a new map to guide them. This article explains the factors underlying these disruptive waves, outlines the new strategic issues they raise, and describes a portfolio of new strategic moves that business leaders need to master.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Three distinct waves of digital disruption are transforming strategy. Changing information economics enable new strategies - as well as radically new structures for businesses and industries.


In the first wave of the commercial Internet, the dot-com era, falling transaction costs altered the traditional trade-off between richness and reach: rich information could suddenly be communicated broadly and cheaply, forever changing how products are made and sold.


In the second wave, Web 2.0, the important strategic insight was that economies of mass evaporated for many activities. Small became beautiful. It was the era of the "long tail" and of collaborative production on a massive scale. Minuscule enterprises and self-organizing communities of autonomous individuals surprised us by performing certain tasks better and more cheaply than large corporations.


Now we are on the cusp of the third wave: hyperscaling. Big - really big - is becoming beautiful. At the extreme—where competitive mass is beyond the reach of the individual business unit or company - hyperscaling demands a bold, new architecture for businesses.


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How The Internet Of Things Is Changing Work

How The Internet Of Things Is Changing Work | Work Futures | Scoop.it

The IoT world will have so much data coming in from so many sources that the challenge will be in making any sense of it at all.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Here's how technologists think the world of IoT will change the workplaceand how it's already changing how we do business today.


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Work is situational

Work is situational - What's The Future of Work? - Medium

We live in an age of simplistic explanations. We build simple systemic models to guide us. As a result, both our sense making and our decisions are built on an inadequate appreciation of the complex systems we are part of.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

A fine piece by Esko Kilpi. I highly recommend reading it. You should follow Esko on Twitter here: @EskoKilpi

 

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, October 9, 2015 11:52 AM

Some interesting insights, especially around the idea of simplistic explanations.  Just had this conversation yesterday.

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Re-imagining the Future of Work

How do you widen the aperture in your lens of work to see a bigger future for yourself? The future of work reveals that we are living longer and need a new model for how to integrate learning, working, and time to re-energize with family and friends. Learn the science behind why we may be stuck in the old model of work and how to move to an integrated life of work and play.


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The way we think about work is broken

The way we think about work is broken | Work Futures | Scoop.it

What makes work satisfying? Apart from a paycheck, there are intangible values that, Barry Schwartz suggests, our current way of thinking about work simply ignores. It's time to stop thinking of workers as cogs on a wheel.


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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, September 14, 2015 7:56 PM

Even though this is a year old there are some great insights in this TedTalk worth understanding in our day to day world.

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Rethinking Work

Rethinking Work | Work Futures | Scoop.it
Is it human nature to hate your job? On the contrary.
Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:
When employees have work that they want to do, they are happier. And when they are happier, their work is better, as is the company’s bottom line.This is admittedly not news. But that only raises a deeper question: In the face of longstanding evidence that routinization and an overemphasis on pay lead to worse performance in the workplace, why have we continued to tolerate and even embrace that approach to work?
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dominique turcq's curator insight, September 2, 2015 4:59 AM

Human nature loves to work, why don't we like to recognize it? Are we afraid of being exploited ? But the two debates should be separated: work and pay do not have to be always connected in the same way. There are plenty of possible relations between the two.

Stephen Dale's curator insight, September 2, 2015 8:40 AM

From the article: "Work that is adequately compensated is an important social good. But so is work that is worth doing. Half of our waking lives is a terrible thing to waste". Is your work worthwhile?

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Networks and the Nature of the Firm

Networks and the Nature of the Firm - What's The Future of Work? - Medium

The discussion around companies like Uber and Airbnb is too narrow. The issue isn’t just employment, but a huge economic shift led by software and connectedness.


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Artificial Intelligence and the Future of Work

Artificial Intelligence and the Future of Work | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Automation will come both from advanced robotics in manufacturing and from computerization of complex analytical tasks. While this will be a boon for those companies’ bottom lines, it will likely be disastrous for existing or prospective employees if other avenues for employment don’t manifest. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Almost half of all jobs in the Western world (47%) could be automated by computers within the next two decades according to The Economist and researchers from the University of Oxford’s Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology.


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Will Advances in Technology Create a Jobless Future?

Will Advances in Technology Create a Jobless Future? | Work Futures | Scoop.it

We’re in the midst of a jobs crisis, and rapid advances in AI and other technologies may be one culprit. How can we get better at sharing the wealth that technology creates?


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

If it’s difficult to quantify the effect of today’s technology on job creation, it’s impossible to accurately predict the effects of future advances. That opens the door to wild speculation.


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A World Without Work

A World Without Work | Work Futures | Scoop.it

For centuries, experts have predicted that machines would make workers obsolete. That moment may finally be arriving. Could that be a good thing?


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

What does the “end of work” mean, exactly?


After 300 years of people crying wolf, there are now three broad reasons to take seriously the argument that the beast is at the door: the ongoing triumph of capital over labor, the quiet demise of the working man, and the impressive dexterity of information technology.


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Narratives for the Future of Working

We need radically new stories to create the planetary culture we want to live and work in.


Most of our current political, social and socio-economic systems will no longer provide feasible solutions in the future.


We can no longer rely on old narratives and cannot simply adjust to the new times.


We need radical new approaches to creating meaningful activity for the quickly growing population on this planet.


Read more here: http://philiphorvath.com/thoughts-on-narratives-for-the-future-of-working. 

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Stephen Dale's curator insight, June 24, 2015 5:10 AM

How would you add value in a future where you didn’t have to work?

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What Knowledge Workers Stand to Gain from Automation

What Knowledge Workers Stand to Gain from Automation | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Workplaces will naturally gravitate toward teams of humans and robots working together to accomplish goals, each assigned the tasks for which they are ideally suited.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Contrary to today’s worst fears, robotics could facilitate the rise, not the demise, of the knowledge worker.


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After Robots Take Our Jobs, This Is What the Economy Will Look Like

After Robots Take Our Jobs, This Is What the Economy Will Look Like | Work Futures | Scoop.it

No matter what kind of work you're in, from accounting to bartending, there's some technology, data or machine learning company trying to figure out how to automate or simplify the process.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Imagine a world where humans are paid just for being alive.


The idea of a universal, base income provided to all people without conditions is as old as the enlightenment, and even Martin Luther King Jr. once said that a "guaranteed income" could be a simple solution to permanently abolish poverty.


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No Time to Be Nice at Work

No Time to Be Nice at Work | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Rudeness and bad behavior have all grown over the last decades, particularly at work. How we treat one another at work matters. Insensitive interactions have a way of whittling away at people’s health, performance and souls.



Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Bosses produce demoralized employees through a string of actions: walking away from a conversation because they lose interest; answering calls in the middle of meetings without leaving the room; openly mocking people by pointing out their flaws or personality quirks in front of others; reminding their subordinates of their “role” in the organization and “title”; taking credit for wins, but pointing the finger at others when problems arise. Employees who are harmed by this behavior, instead of sharing ideas or asking for help, hold back.




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Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, July 6, 2015 9:59 AM

No excuse for rude behavior

Curated by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Thinker ★ Speaker ★ Writer ★ Leadership Adviser ★ Learning Designer ★ Neo-Generalist

Kenneth Mikkelsen is co-founder of FutureShifts. We help visionary companies identify and tackle the big shifts in the world by cultivating the skills, mindsets, behaviors and organisational cultures needed to succeed in times of change.