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Coherency in contradiction

Coherency in contradiction | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Embracing the contradictions and apparent incoherency of our present condition may induce institutional change that better enables learning, innovation, and sustained performance improvement.


Report 5 of the 2013 Shift Index series. 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

I suggest that you also watch this Tedx Talk with John Hagel: From push to passion.


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How a Corporate Cult Captures and Destroys Our Best Graduates

How a Corporate Cult Captures and Destroys Our Best Graduates | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Universities should defend students against lovebombing by banks and consultancy firms – before it ruins their lives.



Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Excellent column in The Guardian by @GeorgeMonbiot

 

Excerpt from the column:

 

To seek enlightenment, intellectual or spiritual; to do good; to love and be loved; to create and to teach: these are the highest purposes of humankind. If there is meaning in life, it lies here.

 

Those who graduate from the leading universities have more opportunity than most to find such purpose. So why do so many end up in pointless and destructive jobs? Finance, management consultancy, advertising, public relations, lobbying: these and other useless occupations consume thousands of the brightest students. To take such jobs at graduation, as many will in the next few weeks, is to amputate life close to its base.

 

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khoj in india's curator insight, August 6, 12:10 PM

http://bit.ly/2vEI0nh

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 10, 11:39 AM

Have seen it happen too many times!

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What jobs will still be around in 20 years?

What jobs will still be around in 20 years? | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Jobs won’t entirely disappear; many will simply be redefined. But people will likely lack new skillsets required for new roles and be out of work anyway.

 

 

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The Gig Economy Celebrates Working Yourself to Death

The Gig Economy Celebrates Working Yourself to Death | Work Futures | Scoop.it

The gig economy, exemplified by startups like Lyft and Fiverr, has further normalised very low pay with no insurance or benefits.

 

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 30, 2:39 AM

What do you think?

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The Meaning of Life in a World Without Work

The Meaning of Life in a World Without Work | Work Futures | Scoop.it

As technology renders jobs obsolete, what will keep us busy? Sapiens author Yuval Noah Harari examines ‘the useless class’ and a new quest for purpose.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The end of work will not necessarily mean the end of meaning, because meaning is generated by imagining rather than by working. Work is essential for meaning only according to some ideologies and lifestyles. 

 

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 8, 8:12 PM

What are your thoughts?

 

Bay Jordan's curator insight, May 9, 7:32 AM
This is profound stuff and definitely warrants further thinking and serious debate.

I don't think there is any question that a life without work will create major social and economic problems. I question, however, with equating work with meaning is appropriate. In essence work is currently an essential element in providing the means to live (which is why we call it a livelihood) and, yes, the work we do inevitably frames our concept of who we are. But does that ipso facto mean it gives us meaning? Only to the extent that it measures our contribution to our fellow humans, which is one of the integral elements of being human and a major factor in our survival. Thus suggesting that keeping "a useless class" occupied playing games can indefinitely replace that innate need, could be delusional. You need look no further than the disillusion and dissatisfaction manifest in global politics today to see this and the danger that blindly pursuing this road could present.        
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Why do we work so hard?

Why do we work so hard? | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Our jobs have become prisons from which we don’t want to escape.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Work follows us home on our smartphones, tugging at us during an evening out or in the middle of our children’s bedtime routines. It makes permanent use of valuable cognitive space, and chooses odd hours to pace through our thoughts, shoving aside whatever might have been there before. It colonises our personal relationships and uses them for its own ends. It becomes our lives if we are not careful. It becomes us.

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 17, 2:44 PM
This is a good question, which is well-explored in the article.
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 22, 8:03 AM

Is this a true picture of work?

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Douglas Coupland: 'The nine to five is barbaric'

Douglas Coupland: 'The nine to five is barbaric' | Work Futures | Scoop.it

The Generation X author on the future of work and how we’ve all turned into millennials.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Our working days are becoming interspersed with leisure and home activities. We will need to learn to adapt to a freeform schedule, which will present a psychological challenge to those who crave structure. 

 

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What if jobs are not the solution but the problem? 

What if jobs are not the solution but the problem?  | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Economists believe in full employment. Americans think that work builds character. But what if jobs aren’t working anymore?

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

What comes after work? What would you do without your job as the external discipline that organises your waking life – as the social imperative that gets you up and on your way to the factory, the office, the store, the warehouse, the restaurant, wherever you work and, no matter how much you hate it, keeps you coming back? What would you do if you didn’t have to work to receive an income?

 

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Who Wins in the Gig Economy, and Who Loses

Who Wins in the Gig Economy, and Who Loses | Work Futures | Scoop.it

As the jobs-based economy gives way to the gig economy, winners and losers are determined by the type of worker you are — or can become.

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The gig economy rewards hustle. Workers entrenched in a passive, complacent employee mindset that relies on their employer to provide a sense of stability, career progression, and financial security will struggle.

 

Independent workers who are comfortable with and excited about developing their own income streams, marketing themselves, and connecting with others are best positioned to take advantage of the many opportunities the gig economy offers.

 

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Video Killed the Radio Star

Video Killed the Radio Star | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Technology has not only changed the way we preserve the memories of graduations. During the past few decades, technology has fundamentally altered the way we work, the way we play, and the way we live.

 

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

How games, phones, and other tech innovations are changing the labor force.

 

This essay is adapted from the speech given by Erik Hurst at the 527th Convocation at Chicago Booth in June 2016. 

 

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The Most Important Design Jobs Of The Future

The Most Important Design Jobs Of The Future | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Design leaders at Google, Microsoft, Autodesk, Ideo, Artefact, Teague, Lunar, Huge, New Deal, and fuseproject predict 18 new design jobs.

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Design has matured from a largely stylistic endeavor to a field tasked with solving thorny technological and social problems, an evolution that will accelerate as companies enlist designers for increasingly complex opportunities, from self-driving cars to human biology.

 

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If robots are the future of work, where do humans fit in?

If robots are the future of work, where do humans fit in? | Work Futures | Scoop.it

We need to rethink our view of jobs and leisure – and quickly, if we are to avoid becoming obsolete.

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The question of how to distribute wealth in the future curves back round to meet a conundrum raised by the past: how do we remake the social safety net so that it embodies solidarity, generosity and trust, rather than the welfare state of the present, rickety with the woodworm of mutual suspicion.

 

 

 

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How To Avoid Being Replaced By A Robot

How To Avoid Being Replaced By A Robot | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Your job will probably be affected by automation, but the future isn't as bleak as it seems. Here's 5 steps to remain relevant and employed.

 

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

If history is our guide, job displacement from smart machines jobs simply means that knowledge workers must learn how to adapt, similar to how civilization successfully transitioned from an agricultural to an industrial society. They must learn how to supplement and enhance their skills.

 

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Quit Your Job

Quit Your Job | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Research indicates that having a sense of purpose is a powerful predictor of mental and physical robustness. A midlife career shift can be good for cognition, well-being, and even longevity.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center have found that a third of people whose brains, upon autopsy, display the plaques and tangles of Alzheimer’s never exhibited memory loss or intellectual impairment. The best predictor of whether someone would escape these symptoms was whether they felt strongly that they had a purpose in life. Those who did were two and a half times as likely to be unafflicted as those who didn’t.

 

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Ricard Lloria's curator insight, March 13, 2016 5:46 AM

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center have found that a third of people whose brains, upon autopsy, display the plaques and tangles of Alzheimer’s never exhibited memory loss or intellectual impairment. The best predictor of whether someone would escape these symptoms was whether they felt strongly that they had a purpose in life. Those who did were two and a half times as likely to be unafflicted as those who didn’t.

 

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Lessons From a Silicon Valley Maverick: New Ways of Working and Collaborating

Heading up HR at Netflix, Patty McCord experienced the unconventional start-up work cultures of Silicon Valley up close. She has made a close study of what makes these new cultures work and offers some surprising insights into how deceptively traditional some of these eccentric new offices still are.

 

Finally she introduces some challenging new ideas on how to motivate people, develop talent, build trust, and ultimately create dynamic and thriving businesses anyplace, and in any industry.

 

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What is the Future of Your Job?

What is the Future of Your Job? | Work Futures | Scoop.it

The World Economic Forum’s Future of Jobs report seeks to understand the current and future impact of key disruptions on employment levels, skill sets and recruitment patterns in different industries and countries. It does so by asking the talent and strategy executives of today’s largest employers to imagine how jobs in their industry will change up to the year 2020.

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Unless employers and employees act today, the threat of automation and a jobless future could become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

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The Future of Jobs

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is interacting with other socio-economic and demographic factors to create a perfect storm of business model change in all industries, resulting in major disruptions to labour markets.

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

New categories of jobs will emerge, partly or wholly displacing others. The skill sets required in both old and new occupations will change in most industries and transform how and where people work. It may also affect female and male workers differently and transform the dynamics of the industry gender gap. The Future of Jobs Report aims to unpack and provide specific information on the relative magnitude of these trends by industry and geography, and on the expected time horizon for their impact to be felt on job functions, employment levels and skills.

 

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A World without Work?

A World without Work? | Work Futures | Scoop.it

 

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is upon us. How will it affect our jobs? 

 

The economist John Maynard Keynes predicted that by 2030 we would only work three hours a day because machines would be doing our jobs for us. However, he also recognised that work gives our lives meaning and brings stability to societies. So the question above is much bigger than “are we going to be unemployed?” It’s also about how technological progress will revolutionize the world of work. 

 

Meanwhile, we are living longer, healthier lives, which – with the spending power of those over the age of 60 expected to rise to $15 trillion by 2020 - is an opportunity for economies.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

How will rapid technological progress and the prospect of longer, healthier lives revolutionize work?

 

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Alphanought Design's curator insight, January 21, 2016 8:19 AM

 

I think I could keep myself entertained the world is full of so much to learn it would be amazing to have the time to learn it I think I could keep myself entertained the world is full of so much to learn it would be amazing to have the time to learn it 

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How The Generation Born Today Will Shape The Future Of Work

How The Generation Born Today Will Shape The Future Of Work | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Longer life expectancies and changing demographics mean potential clashes between more generations in the workplace.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

By 2020, 40% of the population will be racial minorities, and more than half of the population under 18 will be racial minorities, adding that by 2023, whites will total less than half of the U.S. population under 30. Overall, this new minority demographic is estimated to comprise 56% of the total U.S. population by 2060, compared with 38% in 2014, as reported by NPR.

 

What this all means from a workforce perspective is that as baby boomers filter out of jobs into retirement and gradually lose their social and business-oriented dominance, jobs will need to be filled within the hierarchy of business and industry by younger, exceedingly multiracial workers.

 

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What the rise of the freelance economy means for the future of work

What the rise of the freelance economy means for the future of work | Work Futures | Scoop.it

With the right institutions and policies in place, it could become more viable for people to choose a freelance career path. Workers in many fields are becoming free agents in digital marketplaces, for better and for worse.

 

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

As digital marketplaces offer individuals new avenues for generating income, their numbers could grow sharply in the decade ahead. These platforms are creating flexible opportunities for individuals who want to be free agents, but they are raising real concerns about the insecurity associated with the so-called "gig economy."

 

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Five Ways Work Will Change in the Future

Five Ways Work Will Change in the Future | Work Futures | Scoop.it

A peek into a world where your boss is tracking you, your neighbour is a robot, and it’s cool to be old… employment, but not as we know it.

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The way we are working is changing fast and traditional career paths look less and less relevant. This story is part of The Guardian's series on the future of work that  examine emerging models and ask what's to celebrate, what's to fear.

 

This article looks at five trends: 

 

1 | Workplace structures

2 | Artificial intelligence

3 | The human cloud

4 | Workplace monitoring

5 | The end of retirement

 

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6 Ways Work Will Change In 2016

6 Ways Work Will Change In 2016 | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Large organizations today are under greater threat of disruption, requiring early adoption and a heightened awareness of the surrounding business environment.


Here are some of the workplace trends that are expected to have far-reaching effects in 2016, from the boardrooms of Fortune 500 companies to the home offices, cafes, and coworking spaces of the freelance economy.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Workplace trends for 2016 will be set in large part by what's happening in the freelance world right now.

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Borges’ Map: Navigating a World of Digital Disruption

Borges’ Map: Navigating a World of Digital Disruption | Work Futures | Scoop.it

Digital disruption is not a new phenomenon. But the opportunities and risks it presents shift over time. Competitive advantage flows to the businesses that see and act on those shifts first. We are entering the third, and most consequential, wave of digital disruption. It has profound implications not only for strategy but also for the structures of companies and industries. Business leaders need a new map to guide them. This article explains the factors underlying these disruptive waves, outlines the new strategic issues they raise, and describes a portfolio of new strategic moves that business leaders need to master.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Three distinct waves of digital disruption are transforming strategy. Changing information economics enable new strategies - as well as radically new structures for businesses and industries.


In the first wave of the commercial Internet, the dot-com era, falling transaction costs altered the traditional trade-off between richness and reach: rich information could suddenly be communicated broadly and cheaply, forever changing how products are made and sold.


In the second wave, Web 2.0, the important strategic insight was that economies of mass evaporated for many activities. Small became beautiful. It was the era of the "long tail" and of collaborative production on a massive scale. Minuscule enterprises and self-organizing communities of autonomous individuals surprised us by performing certain tasks better and more cheaply than large corporations.


Now we are on the cusp of the third wave: hyperscaling. Big - really big - is becoming beautiful. At the extreme—where competitive mass is beyond the reach of the individual business unit or company - hyperscaling demands a bold, new architecture for businesses.


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How The Internet Of Things Is Changing Work

How The Internet Of Things Is Changing Work | Work Futures | Scoop.it

The IoT world will have so much data coming in from so many sources that the challenge will be in making any sense of it at all.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Here's how technologists think the world of IoT will change the workplaceand how it's already changing how we do business today.


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Work is situational

Work is situational - What's The Future of Work? - Medium

We live in an age of simplistic explanations. We build simple systemic models to guide us. As a result, both our sense making and our decisions are built on an inadequate appreciation of the complex systems we are part of.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

A fine piece by Esko Kilpi. I highly recommend reading it. You should follow Esko on Twitter here: @EskoKilpi

 

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, October 9, 2015 11:52 AM

Some interesting insights, especially around the idea of simplistic explanations.  Just had this conversation yesterday.

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Re-imagining the Future of Work

How do you widen the aperture in your lens of work to see a bigger future for yourself? The future of work reveals that we are living longer and need a new model for how to integrate learning, working, and time to re-energize with family and friends. Learn the science behind why we may be stuck in the old model of work and how to move to an integrated life of work and play.


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Curated by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Thinker ★ Speaker ★ Writer ★ Leadership Adviser ★ Learning Designer ★ Neo-Generalist

Kenneth Mikkelsen is co-founder of FutureShifts. We help visionary companies identify and tackle the big shifts in the world by cultivating the skills, mindsets, behaviors and organisational cultures needed to succeed in times of change.