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Beyond the horizon of the cosmos: Is there more than one universe?

Beyond the horizon of the cosmos: Is there more than one universe? | Future Tech | Scoop.it

Together with Tomo Takahashi and Richard Holman, Laura Mersini-Houghton published a series of papers in 2006 called “Avatars of the Landscape” making concrete, empirical predictions for the signatures of other universes on ours. Most importantly, this group demonstrated that the early entanglement of our universe with the rest of the "multiverse" added an independent source of variation to the strength of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), a detailed fingerprint that allows astronomers to cast their gaze onto the first few moments of our universe’s existence. and to the distribution of matter around our universe, known as structure. In addition, the team calculated the strength of the entanglement and showed that its effect should be observable at large scales.

 

When they published their work, they didn’t dream that these predictions would be confirmed within their lifetimes. Amazingly, eight of the nine predictions were tested within a scant seven years, and all were in agreement with the data. Just last year, the Planck satellite data successfully tested seven of these predictions in one fell swoop.

 

The absence of Supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking at energies of about 1 trillion electron volts was confirmed by the Large Hadron Collider, in agreement with the ninth prediction. Only the Dark Flow prediction is still under debate, with two Planck team papers drawing conflicting conclusions. Taken together, these nine predictions represent a very stringent test of the theory, because all nine originate from a single theoretical framework. None of these predictions can be varied independently of the other eight in order to fit a particular set of data – the data must confirm them all, or the theory is ruled out.

 

Two previous measurements of the cosmic microwave background (COBE in 1992 and WMAP in 2007) have observed anomalies like those measured by Planck, but at a lower level of confidence. It may still turn out that the Planck anomalies are overestimated. If that turns out to be the case we will be back to square one. But if the anomalies are confirmed, and with it our first glimpse of the multiverse, astronomers will have achieved something remarkable. Not only will they have found evidence for other universes, they will also have found the first tests of string theory, whose description of the landscape important for cosmology. More broadly, the existence of multiple universes will demand to revisit and confront some of the most cherished notions about the cosmos and develop a new view of reality: do all universes live on the same underlying space-time fabric? Was there a notion of time before our Big Bang? Can we detect universes that are not entangled with ours? What determines the laws of nature? It will be an exciting time.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Are Roboticists Ignoring the Consequences? - Seven Days

Are Roboticists Ignoring the Consequences? - Seven Days | Future Tech | Scoop.it
Seven Days
Are Roboticists Ignoring the Consequences?
Seven Days
A robot is better than you. “Until recently, most robots were carefully separated from humans,” writes John Markoff in the New York Times.
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Rock music bolsters nanotechnology solar cell efficiency - Nanowerk

Rock music bolsters nanotechnology solar cell efficiency - Nanowerk | Future Tech | Scoop.it
Rock music bolsters nanotechnology solar cell efficiency
Nanowerk
Rock music bolsters nanotechnology solar cell efficiency.
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A self-correcting tunable dielectric crystal may unleash the next generation of advanced communications

A self-correcting tunable dielectric crystal may unleash the next generation of advanced communications | Future Tech | Scoop.it
Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have joined with an international team to engineer and measure a potentially important new class of nanostructured materials for microwave and advanced communication devices.

 

Tunable dielectrics that work well in the microwave range and beyond—modern communications applications typically use frequencies around a few gigahertz—have been hard to make, according to NIST materials scientist Nathan Orloff. "People have created tunable microwave dielectrics for decades, but they've always used up way too much power." These new materials work well up to 100 GHz, opening the door for the next generation of devices for advanced communications.

 

Modern cellphone dielectrics use materials that suffer from misplaced or missing atoms called "defects" within their crystal structure, which interfere with the dielectric properties and lead to power loss. One major feature of the new materials, says Orloff, is that they self-correct, reducing the effect of defects in the part of the crystal where it counts. "We refer to this material as having 'perfect faults'," he says. "When it's being grown, one portion accommodates defects without affecting the good parts of the crystal. It's able to correct itself and create perfect dielectric bricks that result in the rare combination of high tuning and low loss."

 

The new material has layers of strontium oxide, believed to be responsible for the self-correcting feature, separating a variable number of layers of strontium titanate. Strontium titanate on its own is normally a pretty stable dielectric—not really tunable at all—but another bit of nanostructure wizardry solves that. The sandwich layers are grown as a thin crystalline film on top of a substrate material with a mismatched crystal spacing that produces strain within the strontium titanate structure that makes it a less stable dielectric—but one that can be tuned. "It's like putting a queen-sized sheet on a king-sized bed," says Orloff. "The combination of strain with defect control leads to the unique electronic properties."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Kepler Space Telescope data suggests up to 40 billion Goldilocks planets

Kepler Space Telescope data suggests up to 40 billion Goldilocks planets | Future Tech | Scoop.it
A new analysis of Kepler Space Telescope data by Berkeley astronomers suggests that as many as 40 billion planets with climates similar to Earth’s may be calculated to exist in the Milky Way galaxy.

Via Thomas Faltin
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Agron S. Dida's comment, November 6, 2013 4:26 AM
So, we are not alone, definitely!
Ben Dida's comment, November 6, 2013 8:57 AM
For that we are created to live with each other!<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br> <a href=http://descargar-musica-gratis.kambasoft.com/ >musica en linea gratis - go to website</a>
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'This is the start of a new space era': Richard Branson on the future of space travel

'This is the start of a new space era': Richard Branson on the future of space travel | Future Tech | Scoop.it

Richard Branson, founder of the Virgin Group, is just months away from launching what he considers "the biggest Virgin company we've ever built." At 63, he's already founded multiple businesses worth billions, including a record label and a mobile company. But it's his foray into outer space with Virgin Galactic that has Mr. Branson excited. And though on this mid-October day he's sipping a latte in his suite in the Mandarin Oriental in Washington, D.C., his mind is far away in the Mojave Desert, where he had recently rallied hundreds of would-be astronauts to fly on Virgin Galactic's maiden voyages.

 

 


Via Stratocumulus
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