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What happened after 7 news sites got rid of reader comments

What happened after 7 news sites got rid of reader comments | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it
Recode, Reuters, Popular Science, The Week, Mic, The Verge, and USA Today's FTW have all shut off reader comments in the past year. Here's how they're all using social media to encourage reader discussion.

 

"....Newsrooms struggle with moderation, the value of anonymity among commenters, and, in some cases, the legal issues that arise from what’s said in the comments.
The benefits to social are that people are already on those networks, already holding conversations and sharing stories, Swisher told me. “It’s not clear why comments are a particularly good part of the [website] experience,” she said.
I spoke to seven news organizations — Recode, The Verge, Reuters, Mic, Popular Science, The Week, and USA Today’s FTW — about their decision to suspend comments, the results of that change, and how they manage reader engagement now. All but one of the sites say they won’t be going back; The Verge is selectively using comments on stories and plans to re-introduce them across the site in the near future.""""

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News Sites Start Charging Readers to Comment on Articles

News Sites Start Charging Readers to Comment on Articles | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it
Last year, Tablet magazine, a New York-based Jewish publication, started charging people to post any comment on its website. Readers can pay $2 a day, $18 a month, or $180 a year. Alana Newhouse, the magazine’s editor-in-chief, said she was sick of anonymous commenters haranguing her writers but wanted to leave an option for people willing to prove their good intentions by making what amounts to a donation.
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In Tampa Bay, a singular newspaper kills off a rival in a bid for its own future

In Tampa Bay, a singular newspaper kills off a rival in a bid for its own future | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it

For an undisclosed price (though it can’t have been much), the Times essentially bought a list of subscribers it will need to convince to stay on, along with some advertising contracts and maybe a little bit of leverage over future ad prices. It also bought the freedom to no longer worry about local competition—and, perhaps, to focus more single-mindedly on the transition to digital. "... you can count on one hand the number of cities that can sustain more than one daily newspaper, and the Tampa Bay region is no longer among them.” “If a paper’s got to die, I’d like to see it die on its own, rather than putting a bullet to its head with no last edition,” Garcia said.

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Tampa just lost a daily newspaper; is this the continuation of an old trend or the start of a new one?

Tampa just lost a daily newspaper; is this the continuation of an old trend or the start of a new one? | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it

Buy a company, milk the cash flow, sell off assets, shut it down: It can be a profitable formula. Is this the end game for some metro newspapers?

One-newspaper towns becoming zero-newspaper towns

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The Wall Street Journal website — paywalled from the very beginning — turns 20 years old today

The Wall Street Journal website — paywalled from the very beginning — turns 20 years old today | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it
As of this past December, WSJ.com had about 828,000 digital subscribers, with an additional 12,000 people who have access through other means (such as through their company, or a hotel paying for guests to have access). According to a Journal spokesperson, 361 people subscribed to WSJ.com at launch remain subscribers today.
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While newspapers are on the decline, journalism doesn’t have to be | J-Source

While newspapers are on the decline, journalism doesn’t have to be | J-Source | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it

Many Nordic countries have subsidized newspapers for most of the 20th century because they recognize that papers play a unique political and social role that’s invaluable to their democracies. Instead of throwing up their hands and expecting the market to solve the printed press’ waning readership, countries like Sweden are actively searching for effective ways to maintain support of news media and the social benefits they provide. - See more at: http://www.j-source.ca/article/while-newspapers-are-decline-journalism-doesn%E2%80%99t-have-be#sthash.ypJ755yu.dpuf

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How The Sun is rebuilding its

The Sun has been quietly moving mountains to get its site traffic back to mass market, pre-paywall levels since dropping its paywall last November.
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Jarvis: Papers’ Future Will Be In Value, Not Volume | NetNewsCheck.com

Jarvis: Papers’ Future Will Be In Value, Not Volume | NetNewsCheck.com | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it
Print’s demise as anything other than a niche is inevitable, he says, and publishers now need to think of themselves as having two houses, one of which is on fire. They need to maintain the burning house as long as they can to support their business, but they also have to build the new one fast enough before the legacy house is just a pile of smoldering embers.
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Day in the life: How The Economist's social editor engages an audience of 20 million - Digiday

Day in the life: How The Economist's social editor engages an audience of 20 million - Digiday | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it
Adam Smith, community editor at The Economist, shares a typical day

Around 60 people cram into a room at the top of our office to discuss this week’s issue during our weekly editorial meeting. Our editor-in-chief Zanny Minton Beddoes usually chairs, which can be tough because there a lot of opinionated people in the room. Section editors pitch what they plan to include, and then we spend about an hour debating our leader lines, the editorial position we, as a publication, will take on a topic.

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10 tips for making hard facts easy reading

10 tips for making hard facts easy reading | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it

3. Lift the heaviest information into a chart or graph.
There is a way to make numbers more pictorial and comprehensible: Draw a picture.

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Wolff: Print’s dead — but so is digital

Wolff: Print’s dead — but so is digital | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it
A new economic model for news, whether print or digital, remains elusive.
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Newsweek Is Dropping Its Paywall

Newsweek Is Dropping Its Paywall | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it
Newsweek is dropping its metered paywall in an effort to expose more readers to its journalism.

Some content on Newsweek's website will still be subscriber-only. Going forward, digital subscribers will have exclusive access to the magazine's current issue, excluding its cover story. After a certain amount of time, the full issue will be free to all readers.

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Insights From the Launch of ‘Civil Comments’ at Willamette Week | MediaShift

Insights From the Launch of ‘Civil Comments’ at Willamette Week | MediaShift | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it
Enter Civil Comments, a new platform that aims to clean up the comments section by requiring users to rate submissions for civility and quality. Civil Co.’s platform launched at Willamette Week, its first partner, last month — and Acker says the tone of conversation on the newspaper’s website has already improved dramatically.
“We haven’t seen any personal attacks and we haven’t had any spam,” Acker said. “The quality of comments is much higher.”
Civil Comments requires users to log in and rate four comments, including their own, for quality (not good, sorta good or good) and civility (yes or no) before their comment is submitted for consideration by other users.
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Ship of state now sails with no rudder | J-Source

Ship of state now sails with no rudder | J-Source | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it

Print journalists watch as the last flickering embers of what was a tremendous blaze that warmed an entire civilization begin to go out.

Journalists can never be objective—that’s just not possible—but they are called on to be fair, accurate and balanced.

- See more at: http://www.j-source.ca/article/ship-state-now-sails-no-rudder#sthash.XG54rjuW.dpuf

Journalists can never be objective—that’s just not possible—but they are called on to be fair, accurate and balanced.

- See more at: http://www.j-source.ca/article/ship-state-now-sails-no-rudder#sthash.XG54rjuW.dpu

Journalists can never be objective—that’s just not possible—but they are called on to be fair, accurate and balanced.

- See more at: http://www.j-source.ca/article/ship-state-now-sails-no-rudder#sthash.XG54rjuW.dpuf

Journalists can never be objective—that’s just not possible—but they are called on to be fair, accurate and balanced.

- See more at: http://www.j-source.ca/article/ship-state-now-sails-no-rudder#sthash.XG54rjuW.dpuf

Journalists can never be objective—that’s just not possible—but they are called on to be fair, accurate and balanced.

- See more at: http://www.j-source.ca/article/ship-state-now-sails-no-rudder#sthash.XG54rjuW.dpuf
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Another Canadian paper has been closed with -30- sign
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Obama official says he pushed a ‘narrative’ to media to sell the Iran nuclear deal

Obama official says he pushed a ‘narrative’ to media to sell the Iran nuclear deal | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it

“All these newspapers used to have foreign bureaus,” he said. “Now they don’t. They call us to explain to them what’s happening in Moscow and Cairo. Most of the outlets are reporting on world events from Washington. The average reporter we talk to is 27 years old, and their only reporting experience consists of being around political campaigns. That’s a sea change. They literally know nothing.”

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New York Times to Start Delivering Meal Kits to Your Home

New York Times to Start Delivering Meal Kits to Your Home | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it
This summer, the New York Times will begin selling ingredients for recipes from its NYT Cooking website as the newspaper publisher seeks new revenue sources to offset declines in print. The Times is partnering with meal-delivery startup Chef’d, which will send the ingredients to readers within 48 hours. The Times and Chef’d will split sales from the venture.
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CUNY Study Identifies Five Types of Native Ads from Publishers

CUNY Study Identifies Five Types of Native Ads from Publishers | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it
While a major type of native advertising is in-feed promotions — typically seen on social media platforms — news publishers in the study typically are creating and/or distributing sponsored stories that do not always include direct promotions.

The content is designed to mimic or blend in with editorial content, and it takes as many forms as editorial. Examples range from sophisticated story packages to sponsor-written posts. The publications use a variety of media, including text, interactives, videos and photos, and extend the reach of the content via social media and e-newsletter promotions.
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Decline of Newspapers: Age drives views on the impacts of shrinking newsrooms - Angus Reid Institute

Decline of Newspapers: Age drives views on the impacts of shrinking newsrooms - Angus Reid Institute | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it

Slightly more than half of Canadians (52%) say the decline of newspapers in this country “is a serious problem”. This belief is strongest among the older generation (those ages 55 and older), almost two-thirds (64%) of whom view the industry’s struggles as significant. Among younger respondents, fewer than half say the decline “is a serious problem”. More than three-in-five Canadians (62%) have subscribed to a newspaper – either in print or online – at some point in their lives, but this total varies wildly by age, with older respondents much more likely to have subscribed, and younger ones much less so. .

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News Sites Start Charging Readers to Comment on Articles

News publishers have such a fraught relationship with the people who comment on their articles that many websites have been removing the comments section altogether (including this one). Michael Robertson thinks he has a better idea: start charging the people who hang out there. Readers can earn points, which can be used to buy more prominent placement for their comments at the end of news stories, by posting comments, visiting the site regularly, or spending real money. The newspaper sells 800 points for $10. The minimum price of a promoted spot is 15 points.

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Facebook is eating the world

Facebook is eating the world | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it

How Facebook Swallowed Journalism.
Social media hasn’t just swallowed journalism, it has swallowed everything. It has swallowed political campaigns, banking systems, personal histories, the leisure industry, retail, even government and security. The phone in our pocket is our portal to the world.
Journalism is a small subsidiary activity of the main business of social platforms, but one of central interest to citizens.
First, news publishers have lost control over distribution.
...Social media and platform companies took over what publishers couldn’t have built even if they wanted to. Now the news is filtered through algorithms and platforms which are opaque and unpredictable.
проблемка
...if as a publisher your alternative to going onto a distributed platform is to make money through mobile advertising, anyone on an iPhone can now block all ads and their invidious tracking software. Articles that appear within platforms, such as Discover on Snapchat or Instant Articles on Facebook, are largely, though not totally, immune from blockers.
...Publishers are reporting that Instant Articles are giving them maybe three or four times the traffic they would expect. The temptation for publishers to go “all in” on distributed platforms, and just start creating journalism and stories that work on the social Web, is getting stronger.
There are huge benefits to having a new class of technically able, socially aware, financially successful, and highly energetic people like Mark Zuckerberg taking over functions and economic power from some of the staid, politically entrenched, and occasionally corrupt gatekeepers we have had in the past. But we ought to be aware, too, that this cultural, economic, and political shift is profound.
...the next wave of news media companies will be fashioned around a studio model of managing different stories, talents, and products across a vast range of devices and platforms. As this shift happens, posting journalism directly to Facebook or other platforms will become the rule rather than the exception.

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The Smartphone is Eating the Television, Nielsen Admits

The Smartphone is Eating the Television, Nielsen Admits | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it
Millennial users are spending more time with their phones and less time with TV.

"TV viewership peaked in the 2010 season and has been falling ever since.
A new study of media and attention by Nielsen Co. confirms what has now become conventional wisdom: Smartphones are winning and traditional television is losing, especially when it comes to viewers in the most desirable 18 to 34 demographic.
Nielsen also says that traditional TV viewing by all age groups peaked in the 2009-2010 season, and has been on the decline ever since. Until that point, the audience for TV had grown every year since 1949.
The study is Nielsen’s first attempt to come up with a comprehensive measurement of video-viewing behavior across traditional TV, the web, mobile phones, and other devices.
The data underlying the report shows that among 18 to 34-year-olds, the use of smartphones, tablets, and TV-connected devices such as streaming boxes or game consoles increased by more than 25% in May compared with the same period a year earlier, to about 8.5 million people per minute....."

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Where the future of journalism lies

Where the future of journalism lies | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it

On the closure of The Independent

When I was editor-in-chief of the Globe and Mail through the 1990s, our mantra read: “We are not in the business of selling newspapers; we are in the business of buying time.” We were bidding for the time of very busy readers, and the price of their time was rising. It was our job to increase the value of our content so these readers would pay more, and spend more time with us—despite their time-poverty.

Readers now are even more time-stressed and presented with far more reading options online. Their definition of utility in reading is changing, too. The traditional newspaper defined “news” largely as “what went wrong yesterday.” In a world where most capable people are challenged to come up with solutions to what goes wrong, and to forecast the dangers and opportunities rushing to us from ahead, “what went wrong yesterday” doesn’t buy much time.

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I Have Seen the Future of Media, and It's in China

I Have Seen the Future of Media, and It's in China | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it

Updates from the public accounts you subscribe to could appear right below the message from your mom and above a group chat with your high school friends.
These accounts update once a day, often at fixed times during the day to cultivate reading habits. But you can also interact with the publisher multiple times throughout the day. Once you subscribe to the account, the app allows you to leave a voice memo for the owner, send an emoji or a message, just like how you chat with your friends.
This system has given rise to numerous successful “we-media” brands which have hundreds of thousands of engaged readers and annual revenue in the millions, mostly from native advertising.

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A 91-year-old literary magazine is hosting a yearlong experiment in storytelling on Instagram

A 91-year-old literary magazine is hosting a yearlong experiment in storytelling on Instagram | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it
"When I look back at all the posts a year from now, I want to see that they reflect the editorial values of a great general-interest magazine."
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Is it another sort of twitterature or, better to say, graphic novel... Instagraphic journalism?

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Print-only Boston Courant publishes last edition - The Boston Globe

Print-only Boston Courant publishes last edition - The Boston Globe | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it
The Courant’s publishers blamed an expensive wrongful termination lawsuit for its demise.
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The Boston Courant, a weekly newspaper that covered some of Boston’s most prosperous neighborhoods for 20 years, said it is ceasing publication after its owners lost a wrongful termination lawsuit brought by a former employee.... In a telephone interview Monday afternoon, Jacobs said the total cost of the judgment, with interest, rose to about $300,000.

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Why One Professor Thinks Academics Should Write ‘BuzzFeed-Style Scholarship’ – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Why One Professor Thinks Academics Should Write ‘BuzzFeed-Style Scholarship’ – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Future of Journalism. Debatable. | Scoop.it

“My dream for this is that you eventually get locked in a click-bait loop of scholarly arguments, rather than articles about Disney princesses and what to do in your 20s,”

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