Future of Gaming (5-10 years)
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Compare Video Game Consoles

Compare Video Game Consoles | Future of Gaming (5-10 years) | Scoop.it
Compare the best video game consoles available. Side-by-side comparisons of features and prices of top rated gaming consoles. Easily see which console stands above the rest.
Dylan Nowakowski's insight:

the comparason of modern day technology will alow for predictions to be made in the future.

 

eg, who will controle the market, have the best prices, software, hardware, functionality, ect.

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Future of Gaming Ep. 3 - Next Generation Consoles - Future of Gaming - IGN Video

Future of Gaming Ep. 3 - Next Generation Consoles - Future of Gaming - IGN Video | Future of Gaming (5-10 years) | Scoop.it
Here's everything we know so far about Nintendo, Sony, and Microsoft's next generation of consoles, plus a peek into the futuristic offices of Obscura Digital.
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Digital rights management - DRM

Digital rights management (DRM) is a class of controversial access control technologies that are used by hardware manufacturers, publishers, copyright holders, and individuals with the intent to limit the use of digital content and devices after sale. DRM is any technology that inhibits uses of digital content that are not desired or intended by the content provider. DRM also includes specific instances of digital works or devices. Companies such as Amazon, AT&T, AOL, Apple Inc., BBC, Microsoft, Electronic Arts, and Sony use digital rights management. In 1998, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) was passed in the United States to impose criminal penalties on those who make available technologies whose primary purpose and function are to circumvent content protection technologies.[1]

The use of digital rights management is not universally accepted. Some content providers claim that DRM is necessary to fight copyright infringement online and that it can help the copyright holder maintain artistic control[2] or ensure continued revenue streams.[3] Those opposed to DRM contend there is no evidence that DRM helps prevent copyright infringement, arguing instead that it serves only to inconvenience legitimate customers, and that DRM helps big business stifle innovation and competition.[4] Furthermore, works can become permanently inaccessible if the DRM scheme changes or if the service is discontinued.[5] Proponents argue that digital locks should be considered necessary to prevent "intellectual property" from being copied freely, just as physical locks are needed to prevent personal property from being stolen.[6]

Digital locks placed in accordance with DRM policies can also restrict users from doing something perfectly legal, such as making backup copies of CDs or DVDs, lending materials out through a library, accessing works in the public domain, or using copyrighted materials for research and education under fair use laws.[6] Some opponents, such as the Free Software Foundation (FSF) through its Defective by Design campaign, maintain that the use of the word "rights" is misleading and suggest that people instead use the term "digital restrictions management".[7] Their position is that copyright holders are restricting the use of material in ways that are beyond the scope of existing copyright laws, and should not be covered by future laws.[8] The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and the FSF consider the use of DRM systems to be anti-competitive practice.[9][10]

Dylan Nowakowski's insight:

future indistries are looking at software requiring permenant connection to the survers to do a constent DRM check.

 

eg, Diablo 3, Simcity, ect

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Future of Gaming: 5 Exciting Emerging Trends

Future of Gaming: 5 Exciting Emerging Trends | Future of Gaming (5-10 years) | Scoop.it
Technology evolves in amazingly rapid speeds. If you need any real observable proof of the speedy advancement of digital technology over the years, take a look at the gaming industry.
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What is the Future of Motion Control in Video Games?

When it introduced the Wii, Nintendo showed us that there’s more to video game controllers than just pressing buttons. Interestingly, the results of Nintendo’s motion control experiment went better than expected: the Wii became the top-selling console of its generation and the third best-selling console of all time. When the games industry realised that Nintendo was actually on to something, rivals suddenly started jumping on the bandwagon.

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How Video Games Are Infiltrating--and Improving--Every Part of Our Lives

How Video Games Are Infiltrating--and Improving--Every Part of Our Lives | Future of Gaming (5-10 years) | Scoop.it

Sensors, he said, have gotten so cheap that they are being embedded in all sorts of products. Pretty soon, every soda can and cereal box could have a built-in CPU, screen, and camera, along with Wi-Fi connectivity. And at that point, the gaming of life takes off.

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