Future of Education
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LexisNexis® Academic & Library Solutions

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Gillis, Lisa. "The Future of Education Is Online." LexisNexis Acedemic [Portland] 6 July 2009: 1-2. LexisNexis Acedemic. Web. 29 Mar. 2014. <http://www.lexisnexis.com.ezproxy.midlandstech.edu/hottopics/lnacademic/?verb=sr&csi=8054&sr=HLEAD(The%20Future%20of%20Education%20is%20Online)%20and%20date%20is%202009>.



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The-future-of-education.jpg (550×348)

The-future-of-education.jpg (550×348) | Future of Education | Scoop.it
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Future of Education. 2012. Http://www.buzzinbiz.com/join-education-industries/, n.p.

 

In this picture, posted by buzzinbiz.com, we see a bunch of students with their heads down in a lecture room, not learning anything. There is a problem with this, schools, in general is not set-up to where students can go to class on their own time, and learn at their own pace. The pace is usually set by the instructor, and does not always fit every student in the room, but teach on the instructor does without ever really asking if everybody grasps the information that he or she has given in a class. All classes across all schools should be set-up to where students can learn at any time that they want to, not just an hour and a half every day for years.

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60 minutes: The future of education?

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Khan, Sal. "60 Minutes: The Future of Education?" Khan Academy. 60 Minutes/Khan Academy, 29 Mar. 2012. Web. 29 Mar. 2014.

 

From the Khan Academy website, we come across a video by 60 Minutes that dives into what the future of education might behold for the students of middle and high school kids not just in the Unites States, but at schools all over the world. Sal Khan, from the outside might just look like a normal, everyday kind of guy, but with three degrees from MIT and an MBA from Harvard, he is doing so much more than he ever thought that he would do. Originally starting as a way to help his cousins with their schoolwork, he has turned a couple videos being see by just his cousin’s to over 4,000 videos seen by over four million of people all over the world. Sal is able to teach everything from physics and biology, all the way to advanced calculus and medicine. When Sal is making one of these videos, there is never any visual aspect other than him drawing on his computer. Sal says this “It makes them feel as if we’re working together to solve the problems.” If Sal can do this with over 4 million kids from one site, imagine what teachers can do in the classroom with this technology.

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Future of Post-Human Education : A Preface to a New Theory of Teaching and Learning

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Immersive Video Games: The Future of Education?

Immersive Video Games: The Future of Education? | Future of Education | Scoop.it
Eric Wohnig's insight:

Laskow, Sarah. "Immersive Video Games: The Future of Education?" Mental Floss. Mental Floss, 9 Mar. 2014. Web. 29 Mar. 2014.

 

Immersive Video Game: The Future of Education? Navid Khonsari is developing a video game about the Iranian Revolution, which he wants to be exciting. In the game, you have to watch how you talk to your family, watch who you trust, and you can buy lemons and cheesecloths to protect your face from teargas. Khonsari knows how crazy games are made, but believes games can be more than to entertain the gamers. Khonsari is from Tran, moved to Canada when he was ten years old. Khonsari’s peers were not warm and cuddly to the only Iranian in Canada, and him lacking English did not help him out. Pop culture helped Khnosari, he was also fluent in Star Wars, video games, and comics. When Khonsari makes his game, he wants to make it educational come second to making it fun, plus he wants the players to understand the deep history of Iran. Khonsari will do this by putting in different stores about Iran in his video game. In 1979, Kickstarter campaign did not meet its goal of $395,000, but felt that they had potential investors.

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Sugata Mitra: Can Schools Exist In The Cloud?

Sugata Mitra: Can Schools Exist In The Cloud? | Future of Education | Scoop.it
After years of offering children self-supervised access to the Web, Sugata Mitra says kids can teach themselves. He argues that self-organized classes are the future of education, and he puts forward a bold vision: to build a school in the cloud.
Eric Wohnig's insight:

Staff, NPR/TED. "Can Schools Exist In The Cloud?" NPR. NPR, 29 Apr. 2013. Web. 29 Mar. 2014.

 

Can Schools Exist in the Cloud? Sugata Mitra believes that children can teach themselves because of after all the years of offering children self-supervised access to the web. Mitra is an educational researcher that has done experiments like “Hole in the wall” that has shown that in the absence of supervision teaching, that children can teach themselves and teaches others. The “Hole in the wall” project demonstrated that an environment that stimulates curiosity can cause learning through self-instruction and shared knowledge with others. Mitra is now a professor of educational technology at Newcastle University.

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Digital Aristotle: Thoughts on the Future of Education - YouTube

Some thoughts on teachers, students and the Future of Education. Help support videos like this: http://www.cgpgrey.com/subbable If there's a bookish child in...
Eric Wohnig's insight:

Grey, C.G.P. "Digital Aristotle: Thoughts on the Future of Education." YouTube. YouTube, 05 Nov. 2012. Web. 31 Mar. 2014.



In CGP Grey’s video, we are introduced to more than just the positive side of better future education, but the problems we would be faced with in the event of bettering the education system. His first point he brings up is that about five out of six students (roughly 83%) do not pay attention in class because of boredom or confusion/missing knowledge. The current school system is flawed, as classes continue regardless of student understanding. When speaking of “the perfect school,” CGP Grey references Aristotle, an ancient Greek philosopher and tutor to Alexander the Great, saying that every student would have their own personal tutor like Aristotle. His solution: technology. It is simple and easy for students to turn to the internet with their questions and find the answers. There are innumerable videos, tutorials, Wikipedia pages, etc. for any topic a student could learn. Even without the internet, a student could go to the library to research. CGP Grey presents an idea, Digital Aristotle for Everyone. Essentially, this is an app that pulls information from the internet, be it educational YouTube videos, Mathway.com, etc., and presents them to the student. He even claims the app to be interactive with its teaching, as it should eventually become used to the student’s methods of learning and the effectiveness of certain videos across a large range of students. He compares this idea to Khan Academy, which uses complicated software to test student learning. He begins to examine how this Digital Aristotle would affect the future of schooling: in short, it would almost eradicate teachers, though schools would still be widely in use as a way of allowing parents to work. It would not be “great news for teachers, it’s awesome news for students and society.”

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The Future of Education: 10 Trends To Watch

The Future of Education: 10 Trends To Watch | Future of Education | Scoop.it
Eric Wohnig's insight:

Mitra, Sramana. "The Future of Education: 10 Trends To Watch." The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 17 Jan. 2014. Web. 29 Mar. 2014.

 

Sramana Mitra’s article examines in depth the various stigma, changes, and opportunities in the near future of education. In analyzing the cost of education, she questions why cost is so high when so much information is out on the internet to learn, generally for low or no price at all. She goes on to ponder liberal arts educations; she believes liberal arts to be “the arts that liberate,” and says that those are technology and entrepreneurship today. Then she speaks about the evolution of engineering education. She explores the possibility of free engineering education, then denies it as a possibility because our government is too far in debt and engineers are the ones who build things, not MBAs. She goes on to speak of Germany’s superb vocational schools, and our own demand for more community colleges and vocational schools, which she thinks should be replicated globally. When she brings up changes in K-12 education, her main point is Khan Academy, and how the methods of teaching are much more effective than dry text books. She mentions briefly learning on the internet, saying it will change dramatically as internet usage increases. When discussing education and the entertainment industry, she claims that a cross between them will have “huge potential,” as our knowledge of media could combine very well with our needs for education. Most of her (moderate) disdain goes to for-profit colleges, but claims that they could change easily and teach what needs to be learned without worrying about accreditation, faculty, etc. Again, Mitra is a huge proponent of entrepreneurship being taught to college students, and believes we will see much more of it being taught by 2020. Her final point is about internships; she thinks unpaid training is very important, a good investment in the future of our companies. 

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