Future of Cloud C...
Follow
Find
25.4K views | +240 today
 
Rescooped by massimo facchinetti from L'Univers du Cloud Computing dans le Monde et Ailleurs
onto Future of Cloud Computing and IoT
Scoop.it!

Apple Is King of Cloud Storage

Apple Is King of Cloud Storage | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
The Motley Fool - Consumers are moving more content into the cloud, but almost half of Internet users still haven't done so. Apple, is dominating the space, but it's going to need new products to keep its top position.

Via Patrick Bouillaud
more...
No comment yet.
Future of Cloud Computing and IoT
Future of Cloud Computing and Internet of Things
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by massimo facchinetti
Scoop.it!

Amazon and Microsoft just scored a huge $100 million cloud deal that can't be making IBM too happy

Amazon and Microsoft just scored a huge $100 million cloud deal that can't be making IBM too happy | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
With the help of CSC, the FAA's will move its data centers to Amazon's and Microsoft's clouds.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by massimo facchinetti from Future Technology
Scoop.it!

Apple on track to dominate Wearables Market

Apple on track to dominate Wearables Market | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
Apple Watch has already captured two thirds of the smart wearables segment

Via TechinBiz
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by massimo facchinetti
Scoop.it!

IoT for food and water: Here’s what the future looks like

IoT for food and water: Here’s what the future looks like | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
In the near future, IoT will drive tremendous innovation in the way our food is grown, processed, distributed, stored, and consumed. Plants and animals will literally have a “voice.” Not a human voice, per se, but a voice based on data that can tell people, computers, and machines when, for example, they are thirsty, need more sun, require medicine, or need individual attention.
more...
Richard Platt's curator insight, Today, 2:13 PM

Take vertical farms, for example. These operations bring farming indoors where all of the elements required for rapid and healthy growth can be monitored and controlled. These facilities are built vertically, so growing areas can be stacked. This greatly decreases the amount of acreage needed for farming, which allows vertical farms to be located in or near cities, shortening the time needed to transport and distribute food.   From an IoT perspective, vertical farms are connected both internally and externally. Internally, small sensors in the soil or connected to individual plants tell a control system exactly how much light, water, and, nutrients are required to grow the healthiest, most productive crops. Sensors will also tell vertical farmers when crops are nearing their peak for harvesting at just the right time to ensure it’s still fresh when it reaches its final destination.   Externally, vertical farms will be connected to other networks and information systems, including databases that track local demand. For example, local restaurants could input when they need to replenish their fresh food supplies. And vertical farmers could access that information so they know which crops to grow in what quantities. Vertical farms can also connect to the power grid, using their windows as solar panels to supply the system, creating a tight feedback loop between the food supply, the power grid, and consumers. This type of IoT system would have been unimaginable a generation ago.

Scooped by massimo facchinetti
Scoop.it!

The best cloud storage services: Dropbox vs Google Drive, OneDrive, iCloud & more

The best cloud storage services: Dropbox vs Google Drive, OneDrive, iCloud & more | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
With so many online file storage providers around it's hard to know which to use. We've rounded up the 13 best cloud storage services including Google Drive, Dropbox, Mega, Tresorit, and OneDrive to help you decide which is right for you.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by massimo facchinetti
Scoop.it!

Key Findings from the 2015 Harvard Business Review Cloud Report

Key Findings from the 2015 Harvard Business Review Cloud Report | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
Check out the following Slideshare to see key highlights from the 2015 Harvard Business Review Cloud Report and learn how cloud technology can improve your enterprise organization.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by massimo facchinetti
Scoop.it!

How to Jump From Cloud to Cloud

How to Jump From Cloud to Cloud | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
Today there’s no easy way to escape your cloud provider. Some big Web names are trying to fix that
more...
Richard Platt's curator insight, August 29, 1:27 PM

In 2010, when Netflix was still early into its shift from DVD rentals to online movies and shows, it started using Amazon.com’s data centers. Video streaming’s popularity was growing fast, and Amazon Web Services, the retailer’s cloud computing division, had the capacity to handle the load. Now that Netflix streams 100 million-plus hours of video every day, it’s sticking with Amazon partly because of Amazon’s scale and features, and partly because switching vendors “would be a significant multiyear effort,” says Yury Izrailevsky, Netflix’s vice president for cloud and platform engineering.   -   All the major cloud providers—including Amazon, Salesforce.com, Microsoft, and Google—use technology different enough so that switching from one to another would require customers to rewrite much of their software. (Jeremy King, chief technology officer of Wal-Mart Stores’ e-commerce division, compares picking a cloud provider to staying at the Hotel California—“You can check out anytime you like, but you can never leave.”)Still, in the next five years about one-third of companies using the cloud may either switch providers to get a lower price or more features, or add another provider to get servers closer to customers or have a backup should one company suffer a meltdown, says David Linthicum, a consultant who creates cloud applications for companies.  Containers break up apps into smaller packages of code, each bundled with all the basic system software the apps need to operate independently of whichever server plays host. This means programmers won’t have to rewrite the code for each new operating system and platform as an app evolves from a project on a laptop to a global hit with millions of users reached via enormous servers, says Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation, a nonprofit that oversees the open source Linux OS. “A developer will be able to write that software and deploy it without having to spend six months” rewriting it for broader and bigger systems, he says. Moving containers from one cloud provider to another is as simple as downloading them onto the new servers.

While market share data are tough to pin down, Docker set the early standard in container software, and the leading options among its dozen or so rivals include Warden, LXD, and CoreOS, according to researcher IDC. Many of the container makers, plus Google, are also refining competing versions of container orchestration software, the layer of programming that helps containers knit themselves together in the proper order to make an app run. Kubernetes, an open source program led by Google, is the early front-runner, says Larry Carvalho, an analyst at IDC.

Robert McKenzie's curator insight, August 29, 2:18 PM

This is a topic that is often misunderstood. At present moving workloads between environments is difficult and has a cost measured in hundreds and thousands of dollars per instance. Containers hold a promise that this will be easier . The challenge is that the containers are themselves proprietary . 

Marc ENGEL's curator insight, Today, 5:37 AM

I like this comparison between leaving a cloud patform and lyrics of Hotel California: "“You can check out anytime you like, but you can never leave.”! Standards are again the key!

Scooped by massimo facchinetti
Scoop.it!

Gartner on Medical 3D Printing - 3D Printing Industry

Gartner on Medical 3D Printing - 3D Printing Industry | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
Market research firm Gartner has laid out its thoughts on the future of 3D printed medical devices and bioprinting with the 2015 Hype Cycle on 3D Printing.
more...
Richard Platt's curator insight, August 29, 1:30 PM

Gartner is widely regarded for its ability to analyze technological trends, relying heavily on their now famous Hype Cycle.  And the market research firm doesn’t just get into the technology, but the society surrounding it, even predicting that there would be widespread social upheaval in one report.  More recently, the firm created a specialized model for outlining specific trends in 3D printing, with the 2015 Hype Cycle for 3D Printing outlining various applications within the industry and their point of maturity versus popular expectations.  And, with this tool, they have determined that medical 3D printing has just hit the Peak of Inflated Expectations, meaning that, soon, we’ll no longer be wowed by 3D printing in the medical space, as the tech is legitimately incorporated regularly in specialist medical applications.    Bioprinting for transplantable organs is listed as a separate category, that is also listed as 5-10 years from maturity, but is further from pure hype inflation.  Michael Shanler, research director at Gartner, says of this specific application, “Some of these R&D systems are already capable of printing cells, proteins, DNA and drugs, however there are significant barriers to mainstream adoption.” He adds, “The sheer complexity of the items to be printed and the high maintenance requirements of these systems mean that initial deployments will be mostly limited to specialist service providers. We see mainstream adoption increasing as the systems become more diverse in their functions.”  3D Bioprinting Solutions may believe they can 3D print an organ in 1-2 years, but, even if they do, there won’t be a top 10 list of organ printers for another 5-10.   Outside of medicine, however, Gartner believes that there are a number of spaces in which the technology is only two to five years from becoming mature that will, in turn, see 3D printing move from specialty uses to broader usage. These include 3D scanning, service bureaus, and 3D printing software, says Basiliere.  With CAD software being made simpler for consumer use, coupled with repositories of 3D printables, consumers have greater access to 3D models.  3D scanners, too, give consumers a wider range of printable options, as they drop dramatically in price.  And, because they can use service bureaus to have this objects printed, rather than on a home machine, they can experiment with the technology more and more.  Basiliere explains, “Advancements outside of the actual printers themselves may prove to be the catalyst that brings about widespread adoption. Technologies such as 3D scanning, 3D print creation software and 3D printing service bureaus are all maturing quickly, and all — in their own way — have the potential to make high quality 3DP more accessible and affordable.”

Jake D'Imperio gis's curator insight, August 30, 2:28 AM

This article explains the predicted prevalence of 3-D printing in the medical field. This will make surgery with bones easier and less expensive and will save and improve the lives of many.  This is exciting news as the normal cost of hip replacement is thousands of dollars and the cost will be significantly reduced.

Rescooped by massimo facchinetti from Internet of Things - Technology focus
Scoop.it!

What You Need To Know About The Internet Of Things

What You Need To Know About The Internet Of Things | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
Information technology  has dramatically changed the way we work and play in a mere two or three decades. That said, the IT revolution is really just beginning, and the next phase of connectivity is a

Via Richard Platt
more...
Richard Platt's curator insight, August 27, 12:37 PM
Innovative business models:  The Internet of Things will also lead to innovation, especially in terms of new business models that may shift competitive dynamics within industries. For example, using IoT data and connectivity has revolutionized the sales of industrial machinery and other goods into a service model. Among the pioneers of this new service model trend were jet-engine manufacturers that shifted their business model to selling thrust and related services rather than actual engines. Service-based models are are now found in a variety of industries. Of note, transportation as a service, Uber. Lyft and others, powered by apps and geolocation devices, is threatening vehicle sales and traditional distribution models. By the same token, manufacturers of laser printers and copiers with IoT capabilities are also becoming service businesses.   These new service-based business models depend on the Internet of Things. The IoT provides the ability to track how physical assets are actually used, and makes it possible for businesses to accurately price and charge for use. Furthermore, the data from all these connected assets permit a provider/manufacturer to operate equipment more efficiently than its customers, since customers only have a limited "in-house" view of their own equipment. In addition, analysis of IoT data allows for condition-based predictive maintenance, which can dramatically reduce unplanned downtime.
Rescooped by massimo facchinetti from Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus
Scoop.it!

Salesforce paid over $33 million to buy two tiny startups

Salesforce paid over $33 million to buy two tiny startups | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
Salesforce paid pretty well for Toopher and TempoAI

Via Richard Platt
more...
Richard Platt's curator insight, August 27, 11:00 AM

The company made three small acquisitions this year and in a form filed with the SEC on Monday, it revealed the deal size of one: In July 31, 2015, it acquired Paris company Kerensen Consulting for $24.2 million. Salesforce recently expanded big time into Paris and bought Kerensen to give it a local foothold in the market.   Salesforce also said it acquired two other companies in 2015 and spent a total of $33.1 million.  Those companies were both tiny startups: Toopher, bought in April and Tempo AI bought in May.  Tempo AI was an iOS calendar app and an acqu-hire. It raised $12.5 million in venture capital and had about a dozen employees, according to a LinkedIn search. Salesforce shut down the app shortly after buying the company and the team was integrated into RelateIQ, another company Salesforce bought. Salesforce paid $390 million for RelateIQ in 2014, considered a premium price.


Rescooped by massimo facchinetti from Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus
Scoop.it!

Intel Invests $60 Million In Chinese Drone Maker Yuneec

Intel Invests $60 Million In Chinese Drone Maker Yuneec | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
Investors are opening their checkbooks to China-based drone makers, after Chinese drone manufacturer DJI became the country’s first company to pioneer a major new consumer product category.   Yuneec International, a Shanghai-based drone and aerospace company founded in 1999 that makes drones and electric-powered airplanes, has secured a more than $60 million [...]

Via Richard Platt
more...
Richard Platt's curator insight, August 27, 12:13 AM

Yuneec International, a Shanghai-based drone and aerospace company founded in 1999 that makes drones and electric-powered airplanes, has secured a more than $60 million investment from Intel’s venture capital arm. Intel has also invested in drone companies Airware and PrecisionHawk as it seeks to sidestep the declining PC market by betting on the possible commercial use of drones.

Intel and Yuneec will jointly develop products, Intel Chief Executive Brian Krzanich said in a video announcement. The two companies have got “drones on our road map that are going to truly change the world and revolutionize the drone industry,” he said.   Earlier this week, Yuneec’s younger peer Ehang raised $42 million in its series B round led by GP Capital, an investment fund managed by Shanghai International Group. GGV Capital, Zhenfund and a number of investors also participated in the fundraising.  

Scooped by massimo facchinetti
Scoop.it!

IBM Expands Storage Software to Help Companies Meet Hybrid Cloud Requirements

IBM Expands Storage Software to Help Companies Meet Hybrid Cloud Requirements | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
IBM today announced that it is adding new cloud features to two IBM Spectrum Storage offerings as part of the company’s investment in software defined storage.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by massimo facchinetti from Le monde du Saas et des Acteurs
Scoop.it!

Les ambitions d'Intel dans le cloud privé

Les ambitions d'Intel dans le cloud privé | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
Tout le monde sait que le métier d'Intel est de fabriquer des puces, mais qu'en est-il de sa stratégie cloud ? Certes, le fabricant (...)

Via Patrick Bouillaud
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by massimo facchinetti from The French cloud
Scoop.it!

Les trois défis que le Cloud personnel impose aux entreprises - Silicon

Les trois défis que le Cloud personnel impose aux entreprises - Silicon | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
L'IT va devoir composer avec l'usage individuel des services en ligne tout en assurant l'intégrité de la sécurité de l'entreprise.

Via Patrick Bouillaud
more...
Rescooped by massimo facchinetti from Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus
Scoop.it!

Nvidia launches Grid 2.0 virtual desktop technology with support for 128 users per server

Nvidia launches Grid 2.0 virtual desktop technology with support for 128 users per server | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
Chipmaker Nvidia today announced the launch of Grid 2.0, the latest version of its desktop virtualization technology that companies can use to deploy graphics-heavy applications remotely to employees who are offsite.

Via Richard Platt
more...
Richard Platt's curator insight, August 30, 11:43 PM

Nvidia today announced the launch of Grid 2.0, the latest version of its desktop virtualization technology that companies can use to deploy graphics-heavy applications remotely to employees who are offsite.

Companies can buy servers packing Nvidia Grid boards and then use virtualization software — such as VMware vSphere 6 and Horizon 6 and Citrix’s XenApp, XenDesktop, and XenServer — to share the power of GPUs (graphic processing units) with Grid 2.0.  The new release can handle as many as 128 users per server, twice as many as before, according to a statement. And Grid now supports the Linux operating system, not just Windows. Plus the technology can now run on blade servers, not just rack servers.

Scooped by massimo facchinetti
Scoop.it!

Get Ready for a 'Second Wave' of Cloud Adopters

Get Ready for a 'Second Wave' of Cloud Adopters | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
The cloud is taking hold as businesses look to cut costs and monetize on their investments.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by massimo facchinetti
Scoop.it!

IoT’s about us: Emerging forms of innovation in the Internet of Things

IoT’s about us: Emerging forms of innovation in the Internet of Things | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
The observation that the Internet of Things encompasses people holds a number of transformative business and societal implications. This form of IoT innovation can be aggregated and analyzed to create fundamentally new types of products and services.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by massimo facchinetti from Content marketing for b2b
Scoop.it!

The Inside Story on How SurveyMonkey Cracked the International Market

The Inside Story on How SurveyMonkey Cracked the International Market | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it

ySurveyMonkey CTO Selina Tobaccowalla provides a deep dive into how the company internationalized to build a world-class business.


Via Monique Walhof
more...
Monique Walhof's curator insight, August 29, 9:56 AM

.case study :  Going global with your business and website..

Scooped by massimo facchinetti
Scoop.it!

Top 5 Best Cloud Storage Services

Top 5 Best Cloud Storage Services | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
Cloud storage (putting away your information online in the cloud) is an appealing choice. One can ge...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by massimo facchinetti from Customer Adoption of Cloud Services
Scoop.it!

Finding your rainbows in the Clouds

Finding your rainbows in the Clouds | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
Cloud Computing..... It’s the future of IT..........creating clouds, consuming clouds, reselling clouds.  The whole IT industry is weathering a big fluffy white storm right now of cloud infrastructure creations to enable their customer’s future IT needs. From Iaas to Paas to UCaaS to DaaS there is a cloud for every IT meteorologists dream! But doesn't the world..... then become very cloudy for you as a partner? Where do you start? Are the products that you’re selling today, the products you will

Via David Ednie
more...
David Ednie's curator insight, August 28, 3:35 PM

Hybrid Hybrid is absolutely key. As a partner you need to remain flexible to your customer’s ever changing needs and be able to adapt your technology and solutions to meet them.

Scooped by massimo facchinetti
Scoop.it!

IBM takes aim at Internet of Things with multi-billion dollar investment

IBM takes aim at Internet of Things with multi-billion dollar investment | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
“IBM is using its considerable resources to accelerate IoT deployments across a wide variety of verticals."
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by massimo facchinetti from Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus
Scoop.it!

Intel Unveils Analytics Technologies for Big Data, IoT

Intel Unveils Analytics Technologies for Big Data, IoT | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
Among the offerings is Discovery Peak, analytics software that is underpinning a cloud platform created to facilitate collaborative cancer research.

Via Richard Platt
more...
Richard Platt's curator insight, August 27, 12:05 PM

Intel last year introduced its Internet of things (IoT) Platform, a reference architecture that uses technologies from the chip maker to create an open environment that developers can leverage to build new products and solutions to address challenges presented by the proliferation of connected devices and data.  The IoT and big data analytics are increasingly being joined at the hip. The challenge is developing the necessary means to gather and analyze that data in ways that will result in useful information that businesses, researchers, hospitals and others can act on.  -  Demand for this capability is creating a transition away from the digital economy and toward an "algorithm economy," Diane Bryant, senior vice president and general manager of Intel's Data Center Group   Bryant and Doug Davis, senior vice president and general manager of the chip maker's Internet of Things Group, outlined several steps Intel is taking to help organizations and developers find ways to more easily and quickly analyze the mountains of data being generated. That includes pushing forward with a project first announced in 2013 being done in conjunction with the  Knight Cancer Institute at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) to build an open, cloud-based platform to accelerate cancer research.   Bryant noted that health care was a particular industry that can benefit from the greater efficiencies and cost reductions that come with IoT and big data analytics, pointing out that the United States spends $2.5 trillion on health care every year, significantly more than other countries but without any better results. In addition, Eric Dishman, an Intel Fellow and general manager of the Health and Life Sciences unit within the DCG, pointed out that hospitals spend $10 billion a year treating infections that patients contract while in the hospital and that 60 percent of health care can be better done at home.   -  In the areas of personalized health care and such efforts as cancer research, a challenge is enabling hospitals and other health care institutions to collaborate over the Internet, according to Brian Druker, a researcher at OHSU. Security concerns are a key reason why doctors are hesitant to share health care information via the Web, Druker said during the presentation. Another is being unable to efficiently move the vast amounts of medical information involved.

Rescooped by massimo facchinetti from Innovation
Scoop.it!

On-demand hybrid cloud software startup Velostrata raises $14m Series A

On-demand hybrid cloud software startup Velostrata raises $14m Series A | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
On-demand hybrid cloud software startup Velostrata, Inc. has raised $14 million Series A in a round led by Norwest Venture Partners and Greylock IL Partners (83North).

Via jean-luc scherer
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by massimo facchinetti
Scoop.it!

The History of Cloud-based File Sharing

The History of Cloud-based File Sharing | Future of Cloud Computing and IoT | Scoop.it
Here's a look at the past, present and future of cloud computing to help MSPs understand where we’ve been and prepare for the changes the industry will undergo in the future.
more...
Shalyn Jooste's curator insight, August 27, 7:01 AM

There is no such thing as an original idea... Who would have guessed you could trace this back so far?

This most certainly made for an interesting read.