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Researchers say AI prescribes better treatment than doctors

Researchers say AI prescribes better treatment than doctors | Future Medical Technologies | Scoop.it
Two Indiana University researchers have developed a computer model they say can identify significantly better and less-expensive treatments than can doctors acting alone.

Via Wildcat2030
Matthew Booth's insight:

This article talks how an AI computer has given more frequently accurate diagnoses than doctors and how it is also more cost effective. This source gives good statistics and will be useful showing how AI might be seen more of in the future for medicine.

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Future Medical Technologies
The need to understand more about ourselves drives us to try to make more advances in medical technology.
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Future Medical Technology | Future For All

Future Medical Technology | Future For All | Future Medical Technologies | Scoop.it
Medical Technology of the future. Future For All.org
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This site contains a massive list of predictions about what medical technologies will be in the future. This source will be useful to show where the future of medicine might be headed.

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Future Medical Technology Analyzed and Discussed | Future Technology 500

Future Medical Technology Analyzed and Discussed | Future Technology 500 | Future Medical Technologies | Scoop.it
Future medical technology is discussed including brain-computer interfaces, nano-robots, gene manipulation, robotic surgery, synthetic organs, organ cloning, individualized drugs, bionic body parts and cryogenic sleep.
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This site talks about a long list of medical concepts that they believe will come about in the future and will be a big part in our world and how we use technology in medicine. This source has a nice depth into how they believe these new technologies will work and be used in the future.

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This Electronic Temporary Tattoo Will Soon Be Tracking Your Health | Wired Design | Wired.com

This Electronic Temporary Tattoo Will Soon Be Tracking Your Health | Wired Design | Wired.com | Future Medical Technologies | Scoop.it
This stick-on silicon electrode network is wearable technology to the extreme, designed as a non-invasive diagnostic sensor.

 

FitBit too bulky? Why not glue a sensor array to your skin?

The quantified self goes nanoscale with a stick-on silicon electrode network that could not only change the way we measure health metrics, but could enable a new form of user interface. And the researchers behind it aim to have the device available in the next few weeks through a spinoff company, MC10.

The development takes wearable technology to the extreme, designed as a non-invasive diagnostic sensor that could be used to measure hydration, activity, and even infant temperature. It bonds to the skin, somewhat like a temporary tattoo, flexing and bending in sync with your skin the way you wish a Band-Aid would. How? Researchers at the University of Illinois, Dalian University of Technology in China, and the University of California at San Diego made it really, really small.

With a thickness of 0.8 micrometers at the widest — around one-thousandth the diameter of a human hair — the thin mesh of silicon actually nestles in to the grooves and creases in your skin, even the ones too small to see. Being small helps, but it’s also important that the silicon is laid out in a serpentine pattern and bonded to a soft rubber substrate, allowing the stiff material to flex, a little bit like an accordion.

“Although electronics, over the years, has developed into an extremely sophisticated form of technology, all existing commercial devices in electronics involve silicon wafers as the supporting substrate,” says John Rogers, who led the study published this week in Advanced Materials.


Via Wildcat2030
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This article shows the miniaturisation of the medical world, while we still see big bulky machines in hospitals, one day everything might be as small and as unnoticeable. The photos and information show just how tiny this is and will be good to show in the essay, how this technology can be nano.

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Researchers say AI prescribes better treatment than doctors

Researchers say AI prescribes better treatment than doctors | Future Medical Technologies | Scoop.it
Two Indiana University researchers have developed a computer model they say can identify significantly better and less-expensive treatments than can doctors acting alone.

Via Wildcat2030
Matthew Booth's insight:

This article talks how an AI computer has given more frequently accurate diagnoses than doctors and how it is also more cost effective. This source gives good statistics and will be useful showing how AI might be seen more of in the future for medicine.

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10 Medical Technologies That Could Shape The Future - Listverse

10 Medical Technologies That Could Shape The Future - Listverse | Future Medical Technologies | Scoop.it
It goes without saying that our society is moving faster than it ever has in the past.
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This article shows 10 very different technologies that we might be seeing a lot more of in the future. These show how diverse medicine can be and how many different things it can achieve. 

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Key Trends in the Future of Medicine: E-Patients, Communication and Technology

Key Trends in the Future of Medicine: E-Patients, Communication and Technology | Future Medical Technologies | Scoop.it

Robots replacing doctors?

I’ve given hundreds of presentations and I teach at several universities about the use of social media in everyday medicine and I always highlight the importance of 1) doctor-patient relationship in person, and 2) good communication skills for doctors, but if I try to think ahead, I have to agree with Vinod Khosla that technology can replace 80% percent of the work of doctors. 

Matthew Booth's insight:

This article talks about robots replacing doctors, how it will come about and whether or not we should worry about it. It also includes the problems and dangers we could face because of it. This source will be good to use as it shows us the good and the bad sides on this topic.

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6 Big HealthTech Ideas That Will Change Medicine In 2012 | TechCrunch

6 Big HealthTech Ideas That Will Change Medicine In 2012 | TechCrunch | Future Medical Technologies | Scoop.it
"In the future we might not prescribe drugs all the time, we might prescribe apps." Singularity University's executive director of FutureMed Daniel Kraft M.D. sat down with me to discuss the biggest emerging trends in HealthTech.
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This artical lists a lot of differant technologies that can be used for Medical. It includes information or AI, Data, 3d Printing, Social health network and mobility.

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Injectable Foam Blocks Internal Bleeding on the Battlefield: Scientific American

Injectable Foam Blocks Internal Bleeding on the Battlefield: Scientific American | Future Medical Technologies | Scoop.it
Field medics want to use a novel foam to seal off hemorrhaging organs, but safety concerns persist

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Despite their best efforts to stabilize abdominal wounds sustained on the battlefield, military first-responders have few options when it comes to stanching internal bleeding caused by, for example, gunshots or explosive fragments. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) says it is studying a new type of injectable foam that molds to organs and slows hemorrhaging. This could provide field medics with a way to buy more time for soldiers en route to medical treatment facilities.


Via Wildcat2030
Matthew Booth's insight:

This article talks about one of the advancements for the military. It describes foam that they want to use to temporarily stop haemorrhaging while they can get to a medical centre. This source will be useful to show that how medical advancements can save lives in the military. 

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