Future Knowledge ...
Follow
Find tag "information"
3.8K views | +8 today
Future Knowledge Management
The evolution of Knowledge Management in organizations
Curated by Karen du Toit
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Knowledge Management for Decision Memories | Harold Jarche

Knowledge Management for Decision Memories | Harold Jarche | Future Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Institutional decision memories can describe how and why we, as an organization, chose one course of action over another. 

[...]

Over time, these memories can be codified and institutionalized. This is Big Knowledge Management, leveraging the power of enterprise software platforms to store decision, process, and event memories. Process and event memories, like project outputs, are relatively easy to capture and codify. But decision memories are often hampered by our tendency to justify decisions after they have been made, and even create elaborate, and often fictional, stories around them. For this reason, it is important to capture decisions as they are being made, not after the fact.

[...]

We have to remember that all of this “knowledge management” is nothing without people engaged in the process. Viola Spolin, creator of the “Theater Games” actor training system, says that, “Information is a weak form of communication.” But, it can be improved, as Gary Schwartz notes, “Story becomes important in the ordering of all this information.” Stories are the glue, holding information together in some semblance of order, for our brains to process into knowledge.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Stories the glue that helps ordering the information for KM!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Why do people share? ~ by @OscarBerg in The Content Economy

Last fall, at an Intranet conference in Oslo, Norway, one of the speakers raised a very important question during his session: “Why do people share?”. I have been asking myself the same thing many times and written about it a few times, such as in this blog post from 2010: “Understanding the psychology of sharing – what makes it tick?”. So, I waited eagerly during the presentation to hear what he had to say about it, hoping for some new insights and perhaps an interesting discussion among the audience after the session. 

Karen du Toit's insight:

What makes people want to share, which is the cornerstone of KM in organisations! 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Communicating Knowledge Management (KM) to Busy Lawyers | LawyerKM

Communicating Knowledge Management (KM) to Busy Lawyers | LawyerKM | Future Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
I am constantly reminded of the importance of communicating effectively.  And I am repeatedly convinced that a simple message delivered in a simple way is most ("Communicating Knowledge Management (KM) to Busy Lawyers" by @LawyerKM

 

Connections  Are the Key…

My favorite (and primary) way to communicate KM to lawyers — and the representation in the KM card, above — is to speak in terms of connections.  It’s about “connecting people with people, connecting people with knowledge and information, and the processes, procedures, and technologies required to make those connections.”  I like this approach because it is broad, yet meaningful.  It allows me to talk about various aspects of KM from culture to technology, without eyes glazing over.

I carry the KM cards with me at work (and elsewhere).  When I need to explain KM to someone, I talk about connections.  After my elevator speech, I hand them a card as a take-away mnemonic.   “Here’s an easy way to remember what we do,” I say,  “the KM department’s email address is on the back.”

The more “complex” definitions of KM are fine when talking to people in KM circles and getting into the depths of knowledge management, but when talking to busy lawyers, spouting some convoluted, jargon-bloated, “nonsense” is the surest way to lose their attention.  Lawyers are no strangers to jargon.  They know it — and will reject it (and you) — the second they hear it.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Knowledge Management for lawyers > useful in all fields/organizations!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

From intranets to social intranets – Part 1 (Social intranets and knowledge management) | DZone

From intranets to social intranets – Part 1 (Social intranets and knowledge management) | DZone | Future Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Pankaj Taneja:

A classical objective of the intranet was knowledge management – capturing all possible knowledge created in the organization and making it readily available to everyone else. The idea was to capture learning as problems were faced, solved, best practices developed, and share such learning across offices, teams and hierarchies – a growth and maturation for the entire organization in the process.

Although the intranet was able to capture knowledge to an extent, it was never able to solve the problem of sharing. Knowledge created and captured in the intranet in the forms of documents, presentations, or best practice sheets, never left the team, office or division “workspace”. The inherent flaw lay in the structure of traditional intranets – everything was blocked off into “intranet workspaces”, each an island of information in itself.


...what social intranets really represent is a shift in philosophy. They recognize people as the most important repository of organizational knowledge, and believe that employees will go out of their way, beyond their formal roles, to help their colleagues and the organization – and derive satisfaction from that

Karen du Toit's insight:

The Social Intranet as answer to KM

more...
No comment yet.