Future Knowledge Management
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Future Knowledge Management
The evolution of Knowledge Management in organizations
Curated by Karen du Toit
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What did Da Vinci know about Knowledge Management? - Chris Collison

What did Da Vinci know about Knowledge Management? - Chris Collison | Future Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Posted by Chris Collison:

"My post on “What did Einstein know about KM” last week seemed to go down well, so I have continued my search for KM musings from great figures.

This week, we’ll hear from the Leonardo Da Vinci.  It wasn’t until I read Gelb’s ambitiously titled book “How to think like Leonardo do Vinci” that I appreciated just how multi-talented he was.  Painter, sculptor, architect, musician, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, writer and no mean athlete  - you name it, he could do it.  Curious then that one of his quotations (one of the few which I disagree with) states “As every divided kingdom falls, so every mind divided between many studies confounds and saps itself.“.  I guess you can make yourself an exception  when you’re the archetypal Renaissance Man Polymath.
I wonder what he would have made of the ubiquitous availability of information and possibilities which we enjoy today?

So my curated top-ten quotes from Da Vinci will take us on a journey through different facets of KM: from knowledge acquisition, the way our perceptions filter knowledge, the superiority of expertise over opinions, the power of learning, seeing and making connections, the challenge and value of expressing knowledge simply and the criticality of seeing knowledge applied."

Karen du Toit's insight:

KM quotes from Da Vinci! Love these!

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Communicating Knowledge Management (KM) to Busy Lawyers | LawyerKM

Communicating Knowledge Management (KM) to Busy Lawyers | LawyerKM | Future Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
I am constantly reminded of the importance of communicating effectively.  And I am repeatedly convinced that a simple message delivered in a simple way is most ("Communicating Knowledge Management (KM) to Busy Lawyers" by @LawyerKM

 

Connections  Are the Key…

My favorite (and primary) way to communicate KM to lawyers — and the representation in the KM card, above — is to speak in terms of connections.  It’s about “connecting people with people, connecting people with knowledge and information, and the processes, procedures, and technologies required to make those connections.”  I like this approach because it is broad, yet meaningful.  It allows me to talk about various aspects of KM from culture to technology, without eyes glazing over.

I carry the KM cards with me at work (and elsewhere).  When I need to explain KM to someone, I talk about connections.  After my elevator speech, I hand them a card as a take-away mnemonic.   “Here’s an easy way to remember what we do,” I say,  “the KM department’s email address is on the back.”

The more “complex” definitions of KM are fine when talking to people in KM circles and getting into the depths of knowledge management, but when talking to busy lawyers, spouting some convoluted, jargon-bloated, “nonsense” is the surest way to lose their attention.  Lawyers are no strangers to jargon.  They know it — and will reject it (and you) — the second they hear it.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Knowledge Management for lawyers > useful in all fields/organizations!

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Knoco stories: Connect and Collect, two crucial dimensions of Knowledge Management

Knoco stories: Connect and Collect, two crucial dimensions of Knowledge Management | Future Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

"One of the earliest models in the history of Knowledge Management, and one that sometimes seems to get forgotten, is that there are two key dimensions in Knowledge Management, representing two routes between the knowledge suppler, and the knowledge user.

These are the Connect route, and the Collect route.

The Connect route supports knowledge transfer through connecting people.

The Collect route supports knowledge transfer through collecting knowledge into documents.

Read more: Knoco stories: Connect and Collect, two crucial dimensions of Knowledge Management http://www.nickmilton.com/2013/09/connect-and-collect-two-crucial.html#ixzz2dp5bmIB4

Karen du Toit's insight:

Two key dimensions in KM: Connect and collect!

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