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Solar Jet Fuel — Kerosene From Sunlight, Water, & CO2 - CleanTechnica

Solar Jet Fuel — Kerosene From Sunlight, Water, & CO2 - CleanTechnica | Future | Scoop.it
Solar Jet Fuel — Kerosene From Sunlight, Water, & CO2 CleanTechnica For the first time ever, researchers from the EU-funded SOLAR-JET project have succeeded in creating “solar” jet fuel (kerosene) from practically nothing but water, sunlight, and...
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Rescooped by Christian J Murray from The Future of Social Media: Trends, Signals, Analysis, News
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Internet and technology: A history of growth (1984-2013)

Internet and technology: A history of growth (1984-2013) | Future | Scoop.it

There are 2.7 billion users and 6.8 billion mobile subscriptions around the world right now. Yet, as mind-boggling as these numbers are, they are nothing compared to what the next few years have in store. For example, by the beginning of the 2020s, literally everyone should have access to an Internet connection!


Via Ilkka Olander
Christian J Murray's insight:

Funny to think i wasinthe 1995 website gang. so now you just have to figure out how to make money off of it before it implodes!

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Rescooped by Christian J Murray from :: Science Innovation :: Research News ::
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Transparent artificial muscle speaker runs on ions

Transparent artificial muscle speaker runs on ions | Future | Scoop.it

Bio-inspired speaker uses clear gel to play music. Gel-based audio speaker demonstrates capabilities of ionic conductors, long thought limited in application.

 

A research team at Harvard has created a remarkable proof of concept device: a thin, transparent speaker powered by ions instead of electricity. Such "ionic devices" could lead to artificial muscles, telescopic contact lenses, and more.

 

An almost-invisible film of jelly can now be hooked up to a laptop to blast out your favourite tunes. The stretchy speaker, which can produce sounds that span the entire audible range, is the first to use ions in place of electronics. The technology could one day be used to build both noise-cancelling windows and music-playing smartphone screens. The team that created the device, led by Zhigang Suo of Harvard University, took inspiration from the way electric signals are transmitted in the human body. There, the flow of charged atoms called ions – rather than the electrons that carry charge in electrical devices – is what allows neurons to share information or trigger the heart to beat.

 

Electrical audio signals from a computer, fed to the hydrogel via the electrodes, caused the ions in both layers to flow. That physical movement then caused the insulating rubber in the middle to vibrate at specific frequencies, producing different sounds.

 

The problem, as scientists have known for years, is that ionic particles are slow and heavy compared to the nimble electron, and high voltages can cause reactions and enough heat to burn away the whole setup. The Harvard team, led by professor Zhigang Suo, managed to avoid these issues altogether.

How? The gist is that the new method doesn't need to move the ions around so much — instead, the particles sort of slosh around inside an insulated area. This lets the charge be redistributed in a tiny fraction of a second, enabling the creation things like speakers, which must vibrate at rates of thousands of times per second.


Via trendspotter
Christian J Murray's insight:

Wow so much  new Sense stuff!  I believe this can be transposed to be integrated with tactile feedback experiences, somebody should hook all these guys up.

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Rescooped by Christian J Murray from :: Science Innovation :: Research News ::
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New approach to haptic displays by Disney Research

New approach to haptic displays by Disney Research | Future | Scoop.it

Teams from Disney Research and the University of Bristol will present two different approaches to adding 3D tactility to touch technology, and the results are pretty fascinating. While incorporating haptic feedback into displays isn't unheard of, adapting it to live content has been a challenge. At Disney, researchers developed an algorithm that can translate information culled from depth maps of virtual surfaces into dynamic tactile experiences. Through the magic of electrovibrations, the team was able to simulate changes in texture as a finger slid across a flat surface displaying both static imagery and live video.

 

"In this project, we develop and apply a tactile rendering algorithm to simulate rich 3D geometric features (such as bumps, ridges, edges, protrusions, texture etc.) on touch screen surfaces."


Via trendspotter
Christian J Murray's insight:

Oh yes, this will really  make  movies and images a new sensation for blind people and those that see alike. Imagine when this becomes  enabled within a head mounted display environment. Takes me back to the 90's with force feedback gloves and walkpads!

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Social Media Statistics for 2013 | Social Media Today

Social Media Statistics for 2013 | Social Media Today | Future | Scoop.it
YouTube reaches more adults than any cable network. In the United States, the number of people who watch television has fallen behind the number of people who watch YouTube on a regular basis.
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Rescooped by Christian J Murray from The Future of Social Media: Trends, Signals, Analysis, News
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David Byrne: 'The internet will suck all creative content out of the world'

David Byrne: 'The internet will suck all creative content out of the world' | Future | Scoop.it
The boom in digital streaming may generate profits for record labels and free content for consumers, but it spells disaster for today's artists, says David Byrne

Via Ilkka Olander
Christian J Murray's insight:

And so with the great sponge  of the mobile arena screaming for more, the  snails of existence pull out their shirts and claim as such to be artists. within the manythat are not a couple will float or fight  their way to the surface and much like the lavae of insects  they shallhopefully make the new art for us. Whilst we figure out how to  filter all the crap.

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Rescooped by Christian J Murray from :: Science Innovation :: Research News ::
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As touch goes digital, is recording and replaying human touch: the next user-interface revolution?

As touch goes digital, is recording and replaying human touch: the next user-interface revolution? | Future | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego report a breakthrough in technology that could pave the way for digital systems to record, store, edit and replay information in a dimension that goes beyond what we can see or hear: touch.

 

University of California, San Diego researchers have demonstrated a new user interface technology: electronic recording and replay of human touch. Being able to reproduce the sense of touch in connection with audio and visual information could create a new communications revolution.

 

Communication of touch signals could have far-reaching implications for health and medicine, education, social networking, e-commerce, robotics, gaming, and military applications, among others.


Via trendspotter
Christian J Murray's insight:

Remember Impact vests, well this along with the  Disney sense technology is now  leaningtowards a full feel environment experience.

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Rescooped by Christian J Murray from :: Science Innovation :: Research News ::
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Radically New Method for Producing Hydrogen from Water

Radically New Method for Producing Hydrogen from Water | Future | Scoop.it

Researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder developed a radically new technique which can fuel a sustainable green economy with nothing more than sunlight and water by producing clean hydrogen gas.

 

The University of Colorado team new technique uses sunlight to split water into its components: hydrogen and oxygen. This might sound easy but this is something scientists and engineers have been trying to do cost effectively for years.
-Using a vast array of mirrors, the Colorado team concentrated sunlight to heat a reactor containing chemical compounds known as metal oxides.

 

When metal oxide compound heats up, it releases oxygen atoms, changing its composition and causing the newly formed compound to seek out oxygen atoms. By adding steam to the system the team discovered they can cause oxygen from the water molecules to adhere to the surface of the metal oxide, freeing up hydrogen molecules which can be collected. 
-According to Professor Alan Weimer the research group leader: “We have designed something here that is very different from other methods and frankly something that nobody thought was possible before. Splitting water with sunlight is the Holy Grail of a sustainable hydrogen economy”.

 


Via trendspotter
Christian J Murray's insight:

Finally imagination wins with  some help from advanced computing. The future looks brighter for carbon man.

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