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Intestinal permeability, gut-bacterial dysbiosis, and behavioral markers of alcohol-dependence severity

Intestinal permeability, gut-bacterial dysbiosis, and behavioral markers of alcohol-dependence severity | Future biomed | Scoop.it

Alcohol dependence has traditionally been considered a brain disorder. Alteration in the composition of the gut microbiota has recently been shown to be present in psychiatric disorders, which suggests the possibility of gut-to-brain interactions in the development of alcohol dependence. The aim of the present study was to explore whether changes in gut permeability are linked to gut-microbiota composition and activity in alcohol-dependent subjects. We also investigated whether gut dysfunction is associated with the psychological symptoms of alcohol dependence. Finally, we tested the reversibility of the biological and behavioral parameters after a short-term detoxification program. We found that some, but not all, alcohol-dependent subjects developed gut leakiness, which was associated with higher scores of depression, anxiety, and alcohol craving after 3 wk of abstinence, which may be important psychological factors of relapse. Moreover, subjects with increased gut permeability also had altered composition and activity of the gut microbiota. These results suggest the existence of a gut–brain axis in alcohol dependence, which implicates the gut microbiota as an actor in the gut barrier and in behavioral disorders. Thus, the gut microbiota seems to be a previously unidentified target in the management of alcohol dependence.

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my bactria are getting me drunk not me

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Supporting the

Supporting the | Future biomed | Scoop.it
During systemic infection, mice kick-start the production of a specific sugar to feed and protect the beneficial bacteria in their guts while fighting pathogenic strains.
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funny mechanism to keep the home-team safe

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Gut Bacteria, Artificial Sweeteners and Glucose Intolerance

Gut Bacteria, Artificial Sweeteners and Glucose Intolerance | Future biomed | Scoop.it
Artificial sweeteners, promoted as aids to weight loss and diabetes prevention, could actually hasten the development of glucose intolerance and metabolic disease; and they do it in a surprising way: by changing the composition and function of the gut microbiota
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

very good comment on the article published recently

 

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Yurii Aulchenko's curator insight, October 7, 1:29 PM

Sounds interesting; should read the original paper ...

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Apple Starts HealthKit Trials With Stanford Duke Medical Device Partners

Apple Starts HealthKit Trials With Stanford Duke Medical Device Partners | Future biomed | Scoop.it
Apple Inc. is reportedly about to commence two clinical trials using its new HealthKit health platform with patients from two prestigious hospitals...
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Startups, Exits, And Ecosystem Flux In Software And Biotech - Forbes

Startups, Exits, And Ecosystem Flux In Software And Biotech - Forbes | Future biomed | Scoop.it
Forbes
Startups, Exits, And Ecosystem Flux In Software And Biotech
Forbes
The world is awash in cool new tech startups and poised for “A Cambrian Moment”, according to a recent special report from the Economist.
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

good one on startup in biotech and exit demands

 

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Mount Sinai Opens New Genomics Lab with Bank of Ion Torrent Sequencers

Mount Sinai Opens New Genomics Lab with Bank of Ion Torrent Sequencers | Future biomed | Scoop.it
Bio-IT World | The old Roche 454 facility in Branford, Connecticut, will soon be returning to genomic science, as the Icahn Institute at Mount Sinai prepares to set up its second sequencing facility on grounds abandoned by Roche in its shutdown of...
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

torrent are on the rise

i also heard that new chemiistri is coming

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Tiny edible batteries could be the future of biomedical gadgets - Ecopreneurist

Tiny edible batteries could be the future of biomedical gadgets - Ecopreneurist | Future biomed | Scoop.it
Tiny edible batteries could be the future of biomedical gadgets
Ecopreneurist
A low-cost non-toxic sodium ion battery could be swallowed like a pill and used to power biomedical sensors or other biodegradable medical gadgets.
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edible batteries))

 

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Illumina Speaks About Plans for Clinical Sequencing

Illumina Speaks About Plans for Clinical Sequencing | Future biomed | Scoop.it
Clinical Informatics News | Illumina will use 2014 to continue development of new diagnostic applications for the MiSeqDx, including in the oncology space, and to submit the HiSeq 2500 for FDA approval.
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

8 MisSeqDX are sold

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Functional annotation of noncoding sequence variants : Nature Methods : Nature Publishing Group

Functional annotation of noncoding sequence variants : Nature Methods : Nature Publishing Group | Future biomed | Scoop.it
The genome-wide annotation of variants (GWAVA) software predicts whether noncoding variants are likely to be functional using a classifier trained on a range of genomic and epigenomic annotations.
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significance of non-coding SNPs estimated

 

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Rescooped by Dmitry Alexeev from Statistical omics and more
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Variations in predicted risks in personal genome testing for common complex diseases : Genetics in Medicine : Nature Publishing Group

Variations in predicted risks in personal genome testing for common complex diseases : Genetics in Medicine : Nature Publishing Group | Future biomed | Scoop.it

Via Yurii Aulchenko
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

well what to expect other then the result - however i'm not sure if snp simulation was completely correct - as no info for epistatis is surely used

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Yurii Aulchenko's curator insight, January 30, 6:41 AM

Example of methodology to be used while evaluating consumer genomic tests. While based on simulations and hence not perfect, it is scientifically sound, and possible to implement without investing millions in new samples

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Genome Medicine | Full text | Pervasive sequence patents cover the entire human genome

The scope and eligibility of patents for genetic sequences have been debated for decades, but a critical case regarding gene patents (Association of Molecular Pathologists v. Myriad Genetics) is now reaching the US Supreme Court. Recent court rulings have supported the assertion that such patents can provide intellectual property rights on sequences as small as 15 nucleotides (15mers), but an analysis of all current US patent claims and the human genome presented here shows that 15mer sequences from all human genes match at least one other gene. The average gene matches 364 other genes as 15mers; the breast-cancer-associated gene BRCA1 has 15mers matching at least 689 other genes. Longer sequences (1,000 bp) still showed extensive cross-gene matches. Furthermore, 15mer-length claims from bovine and other animal patents could also claim as much as 84% of the genes in the human genome. In addition, when we expanded our analysis to full-length patent claims on DNA from all US patents to date, we found that 41% of the genes in the human genome have been claimed. Thus, current patents for both short and long nucleotide sequences are extraordinarily non-specific and create an uncertain, problematic liability for genomic medicine, especially in regard to targeted re-sequencing and other sequence diagnostic assays.
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

Gene patenting issue)

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Bioinformatics skills help Stanford beat Illumina to $40M stell cell genomics grant

Bioinformatics skills help Stanford beat Illumina to $40M stell cell genomics grant | Future biomed | Scoop.it
Over the past year, Illumina's share price has soared 180% as it has established a dominant position in what is potentially a $20 billion market.
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

data management and visualization tools beat Illumina experience

 

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Scientists Discover the Very First Hipster | Symbiartic, Scientific American Blog Network

Scientists Discover the Very First Hipster | Symbiartic, Scientific American Blog Network | Future biomed | Scoop.it
You've seen the cartoon before: a fish hoisting itself up on land with its front fins, being greeted with some snarky sign like,
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

tiktaalik

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Bloom of resident antibiotic-resistant bacteria in soil following manure fertilization

Bloom of resident antibiotic-resistant bacteria in soil following manure fertilization | Future biomed | Scoop.it

In this study, we found that dairy cow manure amendment enhanced the proliferation of resident antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes encoding β-lactamases in soil even though the cows from which the manure was derived had not been treated with antibiotics. Our findings provide previously unidentified insight into the mechanism by which amendment with manure enriches antibiotic-resistant bacteria in soil.


Via Alexander Tyakht
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

antibiotic resistance enrichment after fertilization

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Microbiome | Full text | Human microbiome science: vision for the future, Bethesda, MD, July 24 to 26, 2013

сщA conference entitled ‘Human microbiome science: Vision for the future’ was organized in Bethesda, MD from July 24 to 26, 2013. The event brought together experts in the field of human microbiome research and aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of the state of microbiome research, but more importantly to identify and discuss gaps, challenges and opportunities in this nascent field. This report summarizes the presentations but also describes what is needed for human microbiome research to move forward and deliver medical translational applications.

Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

complete review on the trends

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Seven Bridges Introduces Open Source Cancer Genomics Workflow - Bio-IT World

Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

seven bridges is the Paradigm algorith inventor's company

could break the market soon

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Edico Genome Makes First Sale of NGS Processor

Edico Genome Makes First Sale of NGS Processor | Future biomed | Scoop.it
Bio-IT World | Edico Genome, which claims its DRAGEN chip can assemble a whole human genome and call variants in as little as 20 minutes, has made its first sale of the device to prenatal testing company Sequenom, which will use the DRAGEN to...
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

As ref is fixed - you can make a specific programmable processors for it

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The Microbiome as a Source of Antibiotics

Nature News | While the human microbiome has been mined as a source of novel therapies for years — through probiotics or fecal transplantation — a team at UC San Francisco is now exploring whether more traditional drugs could be found in the...
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

invaluable source of ideas

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GEN | Insight & Intelligence™: Personalized Medicine Market Trends, Part Two

GEN | Insight & Intelligence™: Personalized Medicine Market Trends, Part Two | Future biomed | Scoop.it
This second of two back-to-back GEN reports provides a picture of the field from the bottom up.
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

report on permedicine - but very concise

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Ever Heard of a Patent Map? They Can Help Predict the Future. - Reuters

Ever Heard of a Patent Map? They Can Help Predict the Future.
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patents and publications 

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GenoSpace builds portal for multiple myeloma foundation - Boston Business Journal

GenoSpace builds portal for multiple myeloma foundation - Boston Business Journal | Future biomed | Scoop.it
Less than six months after GenoSpace LLC emerged from stealth mode, and the company has landed a partnership with the Multiple Myeloma Research Founda...
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

genospace - now that news - but i need this information)

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Puppies! Now that I’ve got your attention, complexity theory

Animal behavior isn't complicated, but it is complex. Nicolas Perony studies how individual animals -- be they Scottish Terriers, bats or meerkats -- follow simple rules that, collectively, create larger patterns of behavior. And how this complexity born of simplicity can help them adapt to new circumstances, as they arise.

Via Bernard Ryefield
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

gotta save for alter

 

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Rescooped by Dmitry Alexeev from Amazing Science
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Chemical imaging brings cancer tissue analysis into the digital age

Chemical imaging brings cancer tissue analysis into the digital age | Future biomed | Scoop.it

Imperial College London researchers have developed a new method for analyzing biological samples based on their chemical makeup that could transform the way medical scientists examine diseased tissue.

 

When tests are carried out on a patient’s tissue today, such as looking for cancer, the test has to be interpreted by a histology specialist, which can take weeks to get a full result.

 

Scientists have proposed using mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), which uses technologies that reveal how hundreds or thousands of chemical components are distributed in a tissue sample. But currently proposed MSI workflows are subject to several limitations, including nonoptimized raw data preprocessing, imprecise image coregistration, and limited pattern recognition capabilities.

 

In PNAS, the Imperial College London researchers have now outlined a comprehensive new strategy for effectively processing MSI data and building a database of tissue types. In MSI, a beam moves across the surface of a sample, producing a pixelated image. Each pixel contains data on thousands of chemicals present in that part of the sample. By analyzing many samples and comparing them to the results of traditional histological analysis, a computer can learn to identify different types of tissue.


A single test taking a few hours can provide much more detailed information than standard histological tests, for example showing not just if a tissue is cancerous, what the type and sub-type of cancer, which can be important for choosing the best treatment. The technology can also be applied in research to offer new insights into cancer biology.

 

According to Kirill Veselkov, M.D., corresponding author of the study from the Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial College London, “MSI is an extremely promising technology, but the analysis required to provide information that doctors or scientists can interpret easily is very complex. This work overcomes some of the obstacles to translating MSI’s potential into the clinic. It’s the first step towards creating the next generation of fully automated histological analysis.”

 

The technology will also be useful in drug development. To study where a new drug is absorbed in the body, pharmaceutical scientists attach a radioactive label to the drug molecule, then look at where the radiation can be detected in a laboratory animal. If the label is detached when the drug is processed in the body, it is impossible to determine how and where the drug has been metabolized. MSI would allow researchers to look for the drug and any metabolic products in the body, without using radioactive labels.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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MS Imaging differentiation of tissues

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Cambridge: From the lab to the limelight - Cambridge Network

Cambridge: From the lab to the limelight - Cambridge Network | Future biomed | Scoop.it
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

old report on cambridge startups - however makes sense to read and understand the scale and inetrconnection

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This is real innovation: Illumina's new machine could slash cost of ...

This is real innovation: Illumina's new machine could slash cost of ... | Future biomed | Scoop.it
50 startup lessons for 2014: AngelList, KISSmetrics founders help kick off Launch This Year · 21 hrs ago ....
Dmitry Alexeev's insight:

According to Illumina chief executive Jay Flatley, the HiSeq X Ten can sequence human genomes accurately enough to reliably identify DNA variants 10 times faster than its predecessor.  - WOW What a brearkthrough - you put 10 machines together and it is working 10 times faster - scalability.  
It is cheaper -  however you need to sequence 2500 genomes to save the money (every genome saves 4000) and it will take you 156 days of only running time and additional 2.5 M $ - so it makes sense to start only with 15 - 20 M projects

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