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Funding Technology
How do we fund technology with budget cuts?
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Rescooped by leslie Casey from Technology in the Classroom; 1:1 Laptops & iPads & MORE
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Hopscotch HD

Get Hopscotch HD on the App Store. See screenshots and ratings, and read customer reviews.

 

Hopscotch allows kids to create their own games and animations. Kids unleash their creativity with this beautiful, easy-to-use visual programming language.

Inspired by MIT's Scratch, the Hopscotch programming language works by dragging and dropping method blocks into scripts. When you're done with a script, press play to see your code in action! As you get more advanced, you can add more objects and use custom events, such as shaking and tilting the iPad, to run your code.

Why coding? By the year 2020, there will be a projected 1.4 million computer jobs but only 400,000 CS students. Computer Science is among the highest paid college degrees and programming jobs are growing at 2x the national average.

Many of the best coders fell in love with programming as kids at the age of 8, 10 and 12 years old. With Hopscotch, kids can build and perfect their own creations while while obtaining an understanding of the fundamentals of computer science.

Learn more about us at http://www.gethopscotch.com and read our blog at http://blog.gethopscotch.com.


Via Cyndi Danner-Kuhn
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Rescooped by leslie Casey from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
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Digital Inclusion 'Imperative' for American Education | T.H.E. Journal

Digital Inclusion 'Imperative' for American Education | T.H.E. Journal | Funding Technology | Scoop.it

Despite tough economic circumstances and sequestration, federal investment in education technology "can't wait," according to United States Representative George Miller, who addressed education leaders Monday at the CoSN 2013 conference in San Diego, CA. Miller, senior Democrat on the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, has introduced legislation that would bring back funding specifically targeted toward technology in education, funding that has dried up with the end of Enhancing Education Through Technology (EETT) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

 

The legislation, Transforming Education Through Technology (PDF), would authorize $750 million in fiscal year 2014 "and such sums as may be necessary for each of the succeeding 4 years" to provide for the purchase of hardware, software, and services and to provide professional development for educators and administrators. Included in the total is $500 million in state grants (like EETT) and $250 million dedicated to the "Technology for Tomorrow Fund," a competitive education partnership grant aimed at programs that "improve student achievement, academic growth, and college-and-career readiness through the use of technology and digital learning."

 

"These are tough economic times," Miller told THE Journal in an interview at the CoSN conference. "We have sequestration. But it's becoming clearer and clearer from more and more economic studies that this investment can't wait, if we really want the results that we need — we need — as a nation from our educational systems.... We, the federal government, have been standing on the sidelines, and we've got to get back into the game. That's the purpose of this legislation."

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rescooped by leslie Casey from Common Core Online
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New ed-tech bill supports digital learning, Common Core

New ed-tech bill supports digital learning, Common Core | Funding Technology | Scoop.it
A new bill calls on Congress to fund $500 million in grants to states and districts for educational technology, and supporters say it could replace the old Enhancing Education Through Technology (E2T2) program, which died in 2011.

Via EDTC@UTB, Molly Miller, Darren Burris
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