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Fun Lessons for Teaching English
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6 Web Tools To Make You A Better Writer - Edudemic

6 Web Tools To Make You A Better Writer - Edudemic | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it
Your essay needs to be done and you can’t finish with all of these distractions. Here are writing tools you can use to help you be free from distractions.

Via Evdokia Roka
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Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from Digital Delights for Learners
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CristinaSkyBox: Do You Know the History of the English Language?

CristinaSkyBox: Do You Know the History of the English Language? | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ana Cristina Pratas's comment, November 1, 2012 4:09 AM
Glad that you have found this of interest; it's a fun way to inspire learners to create their own visuals of language and even history.
Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from Learning Technology News
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For Students, Why the Question is More Important Than the Answer

For Students, Why the Question is More Important Than the Answer | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it

In a traditional classroom, the teacher is the center of attention, the owner of knowledge and information. Teachers often ask questions of their students to gauge comprehension, but it’s a passive model that relies on students to absorb information they need to reproduce on tests.

What would happen if the roles were flipped and students asked the questions?


Via Nik Peachey
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Miloš Bajčetić's curator insight, July 30, 2013 3:34 AM

"The quest is for the question, not the answer."

Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from Interesting resources for English Teachers
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Language activities with Wordle and word clouds | efl-resource.com

Language activities with Wordle and word clouds | efl-resource.com | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it
Levels: elementary to advanced. Ages: kids; teens; adults. Type: quite a few uses for the famous word cloud generator, and some links to many more. Skills: listening; speaking; reading; writing; pronunciation.

Via APIBA e-TL SIG, the Special Interest Group on Learning Technologies, Marta Braylan
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Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from Teaching English as a foreign language
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Find Easy to Read Text for Lower Levels

Find Easy to Read Text for Lower Levels | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it

Twurdy is actually based on Google, but it analyses Google results for readability, so it can help you to find more lower level texts for learners without you having to read through every result from Google to see if it's simple enough.


Via Nik Peachey, Om Adam
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Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from Affective language learning with children
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Big books for shared reading with young learners!

Big books for shared reading with young learners! | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it

Check here a list of 100+ big books that you can read to/with your young learners!


Via Juan Alberto L Uribe
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Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from Teaching (EFL & other teaching-learning related issues)
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HistoryTeachers

HistoryTeachers | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it

I know what you’re thinking... How can I join my love of ABBA with Henry VIII? At this site two history teachers sing about history topics to the tunes of pop classics. See the lyrics, hear the songs and watch the YouTube videos - http://youtube.com/user/historyteachers. It's a quirky, fun way to introduce history topics.

http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/History


Via ICTmagic, Roselink
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Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from Teaching & Learning Resources
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Literature Periods & Movements. Literary History

literature periods


Via Pilar Pamblanco
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Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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Why Study Literature? - Freethought Forum

Why Study Literature?Arts & Literature...

 

 

____________

THE ABSOLUTE BEST ARTICULATION of why we should study literature I've seen in a LONG time!

 

QUESTIONS:

1. Are these critical skills for living in the 21st century?

 

2. If so, what rubric criteria would you establish to assess how well we as a profession and we as an an entire society and we as global citizens are doing at achieving the benefits listed here? 

 

3. What rubric criteria would you use to assess 21st century educational reform and 21st century skills that we believe our students should have?

 

4. If we were to create a rubric for the acheivement of the benefits of reading literature and another for the 21st century educational reform and 21st century skills that we believe our students should have, what criteria would be found at the intersection portion of a Venn Diagram? What criteria would appear only in the Literature only and only the 21st century portions of the Venn Diagram?

 

Speaking only of the Intersection of thebenefits of literature and the needs for 21st century educational reform. What valid data could be collected and how might that data be collected? How could we design an assessment that found out whether students had actually adopted the benefits of reading literature into their daily lives rather than merely memorizing the obvious "right answer" that being emphathetic is a right answer whether actually practice it or not. 

 

Are these rhetorical questions at best? Or can an objective collection of and analysis of valid and appropriate data actually be made when the desired outcomes exist outside of the "there is a right answer or a wrong answer spectrum? 

 

The issue I see regarding justifying these outcomes via a data-driven process is the difficulty in determining what data to collect, how to collect it, and how to analyze it as not merely knowing but actually practicing the desired outcomes?

 

We can assess levels of literacy and decoding skills fairly easily.

 

It might take a bit more sophisticated assessment to dertermine whether those who can read do read.

 

However, I have trouble wrapping my head around how we might reliably assess the degree to which the benefits listed here can be reliably observed and documented. 

 

Yet that is very much what I would like to do.

 

Any ideas for restating each of the listed benefit as a rubric criteria and then breaking each of the crieria into observable and measurable performance?

 

I'd be happy to hear ideas jburg@GoogleLitTrips.com 

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 


Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from EFL and Psychology
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10 Creative Ways to Introduce Yourself to Your Stu... - WeAreTeachers

10 Creative Ways to Introduce Yourself to Your Stu... - WeAreTeachers | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it

We once heard of a teacher who dressed up in her best bell bottoms and discoed her way into her classroom on the first day with Gloria Gaynor blasting (10 Creative Ways to Introduce Yourself to Your #Students http://t.co/0KAoFozo...


Via Cadu Souza
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Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from ICT in TEFL
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30 Ideas for Teaching Writing - National Writing Project

30 Ideas for Teaching Writing - National Writing Project | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it

Via LaiaJoana
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Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from eflclassroom
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ESL Holiday Lessons: Lesson Plans for ESL / EFL

ESL Holiday Lessons: Ready-to-print handouts (193 so far) for English lessons on holidays around the world. FREE Word and PDF downloads, plus listening.

Via Juergen Wagner
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Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from Creativity in ELT
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#ELTchat summary: How important is creativity in the classroom? | ELT Squared

#ELTchat summary: How important is creativity in the classroom? | ELT Squared | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it
A extremely active ELTChat on the subject of how important is creativity in the classroom.

Via Antonia Clare
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Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from Digital Delights
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Connectivism And The Modern Student

In the 20th century literacy was the ability to read and write. The subset of skills necessary to be called literate has changed greatly and the definitions has expanded...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from Learning Technology News
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5 Instructional Shifts to Promote Deep Learning

5 Instructional Shifts to Promote Deep Learning | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it

Students can develop transferrable knowledge and skills as they engage in learning experiences that require them to construct knowledge. In order to facilitate these types of deep learning experiences, an adjustment in traditional instructional practices is necessary.


Via Nik Peachey
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misscrawleymfl's curator insight, March 17, 2013 3:19 PM

This links to flattened classroom idea discussed last week MEd

Mounds View High School's curator insight, January 15, 2014 2:35 PM

Interesting ideas to make our classrooms more student driven. 

Jeffrey Miles's curator insight, March 17, 2014 11:20 PM

I like this infographic about how to help students access higher level thinking skills

Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from Teaching English as a foreign language
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7 Good Sources of Creative Writing Prompts

7 Good Sources of Creative Writing Prompts | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it
For some students the hardest part of starting a creative writing assignment is generating an idea to write about. Here are seven good sources of writing prompts that you can share with your students.

Via Evelyn Izquierdo, Om Adam
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100 images for visual brainstorming

100 images that can inspire you when you are brainstorming about new products or services.

Via Baiba Svenca
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elenired's comment, December 13, 2012 9:14 AM
It's a great tool full of ideas, isn't it?
Natassa Dourvetaki's comment, December 13, 2012 9:19 AM
worth using it!
Natassa Dourvetaki's comment, December 13, 2012 9:19 AM
worth using it!
Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from Teaching & Learning Resources
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Writing

Writing | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it
English writing for ESL students. Lessons, advice and tips on how to write in English. The skill of writing.

Via Joe Willey, Pilar Pamblanco
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Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from TeachingEnglish
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Reading more effectively

Reading more effectively | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it
Listen while you read. Part 1 (to the end of ‘Find out how difficult the text is’) Part 2 (from ‘Prediction’ to ‘Looking up vocabulary’) Part 3 (from ‘Usin...

Via TeachingEnglish
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Lesson Planning and the Common Core: A Unit Based on TED.com

Lesson Planning and the Common Core: A Unit Based on TED.com | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it

In this post, I will describe how I introduced the concept of the project and the development of our student-created resource library, a tool that helps everyone to research more deeply. So follow me as I describe real-time writing in a real-world classroom. Hope this helps in your own possible blended genre unit.


Via Nik Peachey, Pilar Pamblanco
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Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from ICT in TEFL
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Free Technology for Teachers: 5 Video Projects to Try With Your Students

Free Technology for Teachers: 5 Video Projects to Try With Your Students | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it

Via LaiaJoana
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Rescooped by Eva Buyuksimkesyan from ICT in TEFL
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How to Teach English by Songs

How to Teach English by Songs | Fun Lessons for Teaching English | Scoop.it
Using songs to teach English just makes sense. Music is the universal language and can be used to teach a variety of learning objectives. It is also suitable for all ages, from small kids to adults. (Add a bit of music to your lessons!

Via Judith Tobar Hernando, Eva Buyuksimkesyan, LaiaJoana
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