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Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News
Reporting Latest News From Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster
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Japanese Government To Pay More For Compensation Then Decontamination - Japan Has Only Raised 220 Billion Yen For Decontamination

Japanese Government To Pay More For Compensation Then Decontamination - Japan Has Only Raised 220 Billion Yen For Decontamination | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
Oct 29 (Reuters) - Japanese officials in towns around the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant reacted guardedly to plans announced on Saturday to build facilities to store radioactive waste from the clean-up around the plant within three years.

The government has so far raised 220 billion yen ($2.9 billion) for decontamination work and the environment ministry has requested about another 460 billion yen in the budget for the fiscal year from next April. Some experts say the cleanup will cost trillions of yen.

In Minami Soma, top soil scraped from school playgrounds and house yards is kept on site, piled up in corners or buried. The city has not been able to decide on a single storage location for the soil because of resistance from residents.

Local authorities would have to keep the contaminated waste in their towns until the facility is ready.

Hosono said it would take about three years to build facilities to store soil and other waste containing radioactive materials, mainly caesium, for up to 30 years, Kyodo said.

"We cannot proceed without cooperation of the prefecture and municipalities. We are very sorry to ask for this, but we hope you will understand," Environment Minister Goshi Hosono told Fukushima Governor Yuhei Sato, Kyodo news agency reported.

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Officials Give Another Fuzzy Claim About Setagaya radiation dose measurements, again "no health hazard" despite jumping from 110 uSv/hr to 170 uSv/hr

Officials Give Another Fuzzy Claim About Setagaya radiation dose measurements, again "no health hazard" despite jumping from 110 uSv/hr to 170 uSv/hr | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it

The detected radiation dose of 110 micro sievert per hour at the side of the sidewalk adjacent to the site of Super 八幡山 Setagaya, Tokyo, were remeasured by Ministry of Education on October 29th.  The ministry reported detecting radiation of up to 170 microsieverts per hour at a height of 1 meter above the ground.

   

The Setagaya ward office had earlier detected 110 microsieverts per hour of radiation on the same spot in Setagaya Ward's Hachimanyama area. But the Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Ministry used more sophisticated measuring instruments called "ionization chambers" to measure the levels of radiation and detected much higher levels of radiation there than those measured by the Setagaya ward office.

 

The science ministry also detected 110 microsieverts per hour of radiation on the premises of the supermarket, about 25 meters away from the first spot, where the ward office had earlier detected 30 to 40 microsieverts per hour of radiation. The science ministry asked the supermarket and the Tokyo Metropolitan Government, which is in charge of managing the sidewalk, to dig up the ground to find the cause of the abnormally high levels of radiation.

 

Officials claim it is likely caused by material buried in the ground, the ministry, the association between TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident is seen as low.

 

Because rain or mud does not easily accumulate on the two spots measured for radiation, the science ministry believes that there is only a small possibility that the high levels of radiation came from the Fukushima nuclear power plant.

 

Meanwhile, the Setagaya ward office distributed to local residents fliers that said there will be no health risk even if people walk through the area.

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Completion of Cover Construction at Reactor Building of Unit 1 of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

Completion of Cover Construction at Reactor Building of Unit 1 of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
We have been working on deploying cover panels which cover the reactor
building of Unit 1 of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station to control
emission of radioactive materials based on "the Roadmap towards Restoration
from the Accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station" mentioned in
April 17.

Today, we are announcing that deployment of cover panels is completed as inspection by Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency has done.

We continue to take measures to minimize emitting radioactive materials

Progress until now is as follows:
·May 13, 2011:Pre-Construction started
·June 28, 2011:Construction started
·August 10, 2011:Steel-frame construction started
·October 14, 2011:Steel-frame, wall/roof panels deployed
·October 28, 2011:Ancillary facilities such as exhaustion systems deployed.
Inspected by Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency and construction completed

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Fukushima Daiichi Worker Felt Sick - Removed Face Mask and Vomited - Worker To Check Intake By Whole Body Counter

Fukushima Daiichi Worker Felt Sick - Removed Face Mask and Vomited - Worker To Check Intake By Whole Body Counter | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it

At around 2:20 pm on October 28, one of TEPCO's employee conducting
document check at administrative building has removed face mask when
that employee felt sick and vomit, We plan to conduct check the intake
by whole body counter.

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112 Bq/kg Concentration Uranium from the soil of Aizu Wakamatsu - 100 km west of Fukushima Daiichi

112 Bq/kg Concentration Uranium from the soil of Aizu Wakamatsu - 100 km west of Fukushima Daiichi | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
A surface soil sample was personally taken from the edge of the hard standing in the car park by a church in Aizu Wakazumi in July 2011. Aizu Wakazumi is approximately 100km west of the Fukushima Daiichi plant.

The Uranium-238 daughter Thorium-234 and Uranium-235 daughter, Thorium-231 were measured in this sample, which means Uranium-235 and -238 were here as well.

Uranium-235 is, of course, a decay product of Plutonium-239 which was a component of the MOX fuel in Fukushima Reactor 3. Plutonium-239 cannot be detected by gamma spectrometry. Although caution should be exercised in drawing this conclusion on the basis of the exact ratio since the peaks are weak, it would suggest there is far too much enriched Uranium here, which is of concern. A sample will be sent for Mass spectrometry
(ICPMS) to follow this up.

The total Uranium concentration is also quite high at 112 Bq/kg (expected is about 10 to 20 Bq/kg). The matter of the Uranium contamination requires more research.

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Tepco staff on front lines feel victims' anger "The people who come here are furious"

Tepco staff on front lines feel victims' anger "The people who come here are furious" | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
Masato Muto works for Tokyo Electric Power Co. in a rented one-story building in Fukushima Prefecture, where only a clock and a calendar hang on the office walls, and most days, only angry people come through the front door.

The nuclear evacuees who visit Tepco's branch office in the mountainside town of Aizuwakamatsu are greeted two ways. First, by a letter from the utility's president — taped to a whiteboard by the entrance — that apologizes for the "great inconvenience" and "anxiety" caused by "the accident."

Next, by an employee such as Muto, one of the 1,700 Tepco workers dispatched to centers in Fukushima to help people collect payments for their lost jobs and homes — provided they first fill out the 60-page application form.

"The people who come here are furious — furious — about what happened," Muto said. "They have a thorn stuck in their heart. A lot of people tell me: 'I want to go home as soon as possible. I want my life back.' What can I do? Well, the best way to help is to let them vent their anger."

So Muto bows to the evacuees, dropping to his knees and apologizing. "This is the first step for us, to then have a conversation about compensation."

"My longest session was four hours," Muto said. "Whew — I was so tired afterward."

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TEPCO Admits Operator Manuals Based On Unrealistic Conditions - Still Denies Culpability

TEPCO Admits Operator Manuals Based On Unrealistic Conditions - Still Denies Culpability | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
Newly disclosed manuals for workers at Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant highlight the utility's lack of preparedness for an emergency, a major factor leading to the meltdowns after the March 11 quake-tsunami, a review by The Japan Times showed Tuesday.

Instructions in the manuals were all based on the assumption that two backup direct current batteries at reactor 1 would keep working throughout any emergency. In fact, the batteries were knocked out by water when the monster tsunami struck and crippled the Fukushima plant.

The manuals also failed to instruct workers to open by hand critical valves normally powered by electricity to vent steam and thus reduce pressure in the containment vessel. 

The containment vessel is the last line of defense to prevent radioactive materials from escaping the reactors. Tepco tried to open the valves to keep the vessel from breaking apart on March 12. Pressure also needed to be reduced to allow coolant water to be injected to prevent a meltdown of the reactor core.

But it took hours for Tepco workers, who apparently had no training in how to open the valves manually, to vent the steam and relieve the pressure, and many experts say the delay may be a key factor that led to the meltdown at unit 1.

Asked at a news conference Monday if the conditions assumed in the manuals were unrealistic, Tepco spokesman Junichi Matsumoto responded, "It may be an open question.

"(But) we don't believe that we failed to do something that should have been done" to prevent the crisis from escalating, Matsumoto said.

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New Research Identifies Japan's Elevated Risk from Tsunamis - Researcher says 4 quakes could trigger huge tsunami

New Research Identifies Japan's Elevated Risk from Tsunamis - Researcher says 4 quakes could trigger huge tsunami | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
In a terrifying scenario where four massive earthquakes strike in conjunction along the ocean trench from off the Tokai region to Shikoku, a 20-meter tsunami in Kochi Prefecture and a 15-meter tsunami in Shizuoka Prefecture could be unleashed, a computer simulation has found.

Takashi Furumura, a professor at the Earthquake Research Institute at the University of Tokyo, also said that such combined earthquakes would trigger a tsunami as high as 4 meters in a part of Tokyo Bay.

The professor presented his study at the Seismological Society of Japan meeting on Oct. 14 in Shizuoka.

Furukawa’s simulation estimated that the earthquake would be at the magnitude-8.8 level and could trigger tsunami 1.5 to 2 times higher than that of the Hoei earthquake.

In Tosa Bay in Kochi Prefecture, where the government estimates that a 10-meter tsunami at maximum is possible, a 20-meter tsunami would strike, the simulation found.

In Suruga Bay, a 10-meter tsunami would occur, compared with the government estimate of 6 meters at the maximum.

Furukawa predicts that a 17-meter tsunami would strike part of the Tokai region, while a 15-meter tsunami would engulf part of the Kii Peninsula.

Those compare to the tsunami estimated of at least 9.3 meters in height that struck Soma, Fukushima Prefecture, from the March 11 Great East Japan Earthquake, according to the Japan Meteorological Agency.

Furumura also simulated huge earthquakes in which ruptures of four temblors occur in conjunction in short intervals.

The largest tsunami to be spawned by the quakes could top 15 meters in Suruga Bay, 3-4 meters at the mouth of Tokyo Bay and more than 2 meters at the closed-off section of Tokyo Bay, the researcher predicted.

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Quake hits Japan’s Fukushima prefecture - 70 miles from Fukushima Dai-ichi

Quake hits Japan’s Fukushima prefecture - 70 miles from Fukushima Dai-ichi | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it

NEW YORK (AP) – A moderate earthquake has shaken the northeastern Japanese prefecture where the much more massive earthquake and tsunami touched off the worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl earlier this year.

The magnitude-5.2 quake struck Fukushima Prefecture overnight just after 2 a.m. local time Wednesday (1700 GMT Tuesday). Its epicenter was on the coast near the town of Iwaki, 115 miles north of Tokyo.
The Wednesday quake was about 70 miles from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear facility.

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Radiation research suggested as way to keep released livestock near Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant alive

Radiation research suggested as way to keep released livestock near Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant alive | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
KORIYAMA, Fukushima -- Pursuing research on radiation's effects on animals has been suggested as a way to keep livestock animals roaming the no-entry zone near the disaster-hit Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant from being killed or starving in the harsh winter.

Nearly 2,000 cows and other livestock are estimated to still be in the 20-kilometer radius no-entry zone around the crippled power plant.

The plan is being pushed by members of the citizens' group "Kibo-no-Bokujo -- Fukushima Project" (ranch of hope -- Fukushima project). On Oct. 21, around 30 people including local livestock farmers, government legislators and veterinarians met in Koriyama, Fukushima Prefecture, to discuss the issue.

Masami Yoshizawa, 57, who has about 330 high-quality beef cow at his livestock farm situated in the no-entry zone, said he cannot bear to abandon the animals.

"I know the cows have lost their economic value since they've been exposed to radiation. But I think there must be a way to allow them to live. As a cattle breeder, I cannot leave them to die," he said. "We have to catch them by winter."

Meanwhile, a 54-year-old woman who had beef cattle in the no-entry zone said tearfully, "I freed 30 of my cows before evacuating. I believe they're still alive."

There have also, however, been reports of cows and pigs that are now living wild making their way into residents' left-behind homes.

Earlier, in May of this year, university researchers asked the central government to let livestock exposed to radiation in Fukushima Prefecture live for use in research. Senior Vice Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Nobutaka Tsutsui expressed support for the idea, but almost no concrete measures have been mapped out.

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Half of elementary and junior high school students in Minami-Soma who underwent radiation checks since late September were found with radioactive cesium-137

Half of elementary and junior high school students in Minami-Soma who underwent radiation checks since late September were found with radioactive cesium-137 | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
Half of the elementary and junior high school students in Minami-Soma who underwent radiation checks since late September were found with low levels of radioactive cesium-137, the hospital reported.

"We will offer periodic checks to students to keep records of their health conditions," said a hospital worker in charge.

The hospital is uncertain whether the students inhaled airborne radiation or ingested it through radiation-contaminated foodstuffs after the March 11 Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant accident.

Radioactive cesium-137 was detected at below 10 becquerels per kilogram of a student's weight in 199 students. The substance was also found at from 10 to less than 20 becquerels in 65 students; 20 to less than 30 becquerels in three students; and 30 to below 35 becquerels in one student, the hospital said.

In August, the thyroid glands of 45 percent of children aged 15 and under in Iwaki, Kawamata, Iitate, all in Fukushima Prefecture, were found to have exposure to radiation, according to the government's headquarters handling the Fukushima crisis. Children are said to be particularly vulnerable to thyroid gland cancer due to radiation exposure.

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NNSA Releases Raw Data from Radiation Monitoring Efforts in Japan - Will Return in November to Update Readings

NNSA Releases Raw Data from Radiation Monitoring Efforts in Japan - Will Return in November to Update Readings | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Following the earthquake and subsequent tsunami that devastated Japan, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is today releasing the raw radiation monitoring data it collected in response to the events at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station.
For ten weeks following the natural disaster, NNSA scientists utilized U.S. Air Force aircraft operated out of Yokota Air Base to collect data during more than 500 flight hours of aerial surveys to measure radiation levels associated with radioactive material deposited on the ground surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station.
“NNSA’s commitment to assisting the Japanese people in the aftermath of a devastating natural disaster demonstrates the value of international cooperation in supporting the monitoring and clean-up of a nuclear incident,” said Under Secretary for Nuclear Security & Administrator for the National Nuclear Security Administration Thomas P. D’Agostino. “NNSA’s unique capabilities played an important role in responding to this tragedy, and we are committed to the transparency of our data and information.”
After deploying its Consequence Management Response Team and Aerial Measuring System, the Department of Energy and NNSA have provided ongoing assistance to the Government of Japan to support dose assessment through collaboration on data analysis and quality control. NNSA also loaned the Government of Japan an Aerial Measuring System and other equipment to augment their capability.
A small NNSA team will return to Japan this month to provide further data collection and analysis support. Once these data have been collected and analyzed, results will also be widely available to the public for independent study and review.

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57.5 uSv/hr of Cesium found in soil - Kashiwa Starts Cleanup After Fukushima Radiation Found

57.5 uSv/hr of Cesium found in soil - Kashiwa Starts Cleanup After Fukushima Radiation Found | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
TOKYO —
Radiation levels as high as those in the evacuation zone around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant have been detected in a Tokyo suburb, and are likely linked to the disaster, officials said Monday.

In the latest sign that radioactive material has spread far beyond the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, officials said the contaminated area in Kashiwa, about 125 miles from the plant, likely resulted from cesium-laced rain that fell soon after the March 11 disaster.

Similar to a number of other such spots found in the metropolitan area recently, the latest discovery was prompted by a local resident toting a dosimeter who noticed a spike in its reading. The incident was soon reported to a community leader, who took the reading with monitoring equipment and alerted the city.

Kashiwa, located 18 miles northeast of Tokyo, has a population of 400,000 people.

City officials have found contamination levels as high as 57.5 microsieverts per hour in the soil, sparking radiation fears in the neighborhood some 195 kilometers from the accident site.

Inspectors from the science and technology ministry believe the hotspot was created after radioactive cesium carried by rainwater became concentrated in a small area because of a broken gutter.

"The numbers we found last week were way above what we could imagine based on what we had learned in the past," said an official at Kashiwa city's radiation safety division, who asked that his name not be disclosed.

"We will cooperate with the government to find the cause and to decontaminate the spot."

“We covered the area with river sand and plastic sheets, which so far have lowered the radiation levels in the air,” said another quoted Kashiwa city official.

“We will decide what to do with the contaminated spot after discussing it with officials,” he said.

Prompted by calls from parents, the city has kept an eye on radiation levels in schools and playgrounds since the March 11 disaster, and officials said they knew that Kashiwa had become a "hotspot."

Masahiro Fukushi warned citizens Monday that more hot spots can be found where rainwater accumulates, like near the ditch in Kashiwa, and urged them to go out and take readings of such places in their neighborhoods on their own, instead of waiting around for the government's plodding surveys.

"As we now have the knowledge of where we can find hot spots, such as areas under downspouts, we should work together to monitor such places," he said. "I think this is where citizen volunteer efforts must come into play."

The soil at the hot spot had a high 276,000 becquerels of cesium per kilogram, the Kashiwa Municipal Government said. This is four to five times higher than the level surrounding the hot spot and many other places in Kashiwa, he said. The condensation process will allow this level to be attained in any place where rainwater accumulates in a limited area, Fukushi said.

Many are wondering if the rainwater HADN'T seeped through the hole in the gutter and concentrated in the soil, then where would this highly-radioactive rainwater have gone.  Didn't this same rain fall on the entire city of Tokyo as well as everywhere all around it? Why would that not be cause for further concern?

Contamination in much of Kashiwa is far higher than other parts of the Tokyo metropolitan area, so the mini hot spot really wasn't much of a surprise, said Fukushi, a professor of radiation science at Tokyo Metropolitan University.

"If the (cesium) detected was 100 times higher than the amount measured by the science ministry, then it'd be strange. But in this case, it's just four or five times, so you should not be surprised," Fukushi said.

The leader of a Citizens’ Group to Protect Children from Hotspot Radiation in Kashiwa city, Chiba, decided to suspend its activities. Mrs. Yuki Ohsaku, representative of the group evacuated recently to Kyushu after her two children started nosebleeding and other core members also are considering moving out of Kashiwa city. 10 members have already relocated.

The government will NEVER announce for people to evacuate. The reasons for this are at least two-fold. Reason #1 is that they will need to pay for the evacuation of the people and reason #2 is that once the evacuations begin it would impact the greater Tokyo area and thus the Japanese economy.

Compost handled by students at an agricultural high school in Tochigi Prefecture contained 74 times more radioactive cesium than the government's safety standard.

The Tochigi prefectural board of education said on Oct. 17 that 29,600 becquerels per kilogram of radioactive soil had been found in compost used at the Tochigi Agricultural High School in Tochigi city, far above the government maximum of 400 becquerels per kilogram.

The Forestry Agency has decided to allow local governments to use plots of land in state-owned forests to temporarily store soil and rice straw contaminated with radioactive substances from the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant. Local governments will be responsible for preparing the land for the temporary storage sites, while the central government will shoulder the cost using its reserve fund for reconstruction.

The Forestry Agency will start checking for radioactive substances in cedar pollen in Fukushima Prefecture as early as next month. The agency plans to pick male cedar flowers in the no-entry zone and check them for radioactive cesium, it said.

There will be many more similar hotspots discovered as they continue looking for them.

In addition to the rain carrying the radiation all over East Japan, there are many other routes for unidentified contamination to be transferred across the country.  The problem with radiation is that it never shows up where you expect it to, and even the smallest effects, like flying insects from the Fukushima area that are eaten by birds, can have an unforseen effect. Then the birds fly all over Japan and release irradiated droppings all over Japan, and while in any other circumstance with 'popular isotopes' (Iodine and Cesium) this would be a nominal event, in Fukushima a laundry list of the most volatile and long lived isotopes have been released. The bugs eat the plants, bioaccumulate more of these harsher isotopes including Plutonium, and suddenly even a few internalized particles can become a potential risk to the public as these isotopes bioaccumulate and biomagnify up the food chain.

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TEPCO submits business plan, will raise 590 billion yen requests Japanese Citizens to raise 890 billion yen - AJW by The Asahi Shimbun

TEPCO submits business plan, will raise 590 billion yen requests Japanese Citizens to raise 890 billion yen  - AJW by The Asahi Shimbun | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
Tokyo Electric Power Co. plans to raise nearly 590 billion yen ($7.66 billion) on its own to gain 890 billion yen in government financial assistance to pay compensation for the Fukushima nuclear accident.

The current business plan estimates total compensation for victims of the nuclear accident alone at 1.011 Trillion yen .

As part of its restructuring efforts for this fiscal year, TEPCO listed sales of assets totaling 348.4 billion yen, cutting 237.4 billion yen in personnel and other costs and reducing the interest rates on corporate pensions to its retirees.

TEPCO's request for 890 billion yen does not include the 120 billion yen the government is obligated to pay in the insurance system stipulated under the law on compensation for nuclear damage.

The company also asked the Development Bank of Japan for 300 billion yen in short-term loans.

TEPCO in reality is asking the government to pick up the majority of the tab for the nuclear disaster, while at the same time forcing compensation applicants to fill out hundreds of documents to receive any financial compensation.

More tension should be expected in 2012 as TEPCO's planned hike in electricity rates and other measures to deal with its financial difficulties are expected in its comprehensive business program to be submitted next spring.

The parent company projects a net loss of 576.3 billion yen for fiscal 2011 due to ballooning fuel costs for its thermal power plants, which have had to generate more electricity since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami crippled the Fukushima nuclear plant. TEPCO's net assets are expected to be worth 708.8 billion yen at the end of fiscal 2011, a level in which its debts could exceed its assets.

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Over 240 volunteers to carry out decontamination work in Fukushima City

Over 240 volunteers to carry out decontamination work in Fukushima City | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
Around 80 volunteers from across the country gathered Saturday in the city of Fukushima to begin decontaminating areas affected by radioactive materials emitted by the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant.

Fukushima has secured the services of around 240 volunteers, who will carry out decontamination work every weekend in highly contaminated areas in the city.

The municipal government has set a maximum limit of 1 millisievert per year for the volunteers' radiation exposure.

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Fukushima Disaster Produces World’s Worst Nuclear Sea Contamination Ever - Over 27.1 Peta-Becquerels of Cs-137 entered Pacific Ocean

Fukushima Disaster Produces World’s Worst Nuclear Sea Contamination Ever - Over 27.1 Peta-Becquerels of Cs-137 entered Pacific Ocean | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it

A French study released on Thursday said that the amount of nuclear material called caesium 137 leaked by Japanese plant, Fukushima, has proven to be the world’s worst nuclear sea contamination event ever, AFP discloses.
The Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) reported that from March 21st to mid-July, 27.1 peta becquerels (a unit used to measure radioactivity) of caesium 137 had entered into the ocean. One “peta” becquerel is equivalent to a million billion becquerels, or 10^15.

The IRSN stated in a press release that this is the biggest single outflow of man-made radioactive materials introduced to the marine environment ever seen or recorded. It will take 30 years for the caesium to lose ½ of its radioactivity, as it is a slow decaying element.
IRSN also found large quantities of iodine 131, though it does not pose any threat due its very low 8-day half-life. 

The caesium, however, is a major concern to environmentalists. The problem with this hypothesis is that scientists have simply not seen such a large quantity of caesium introduced to the ocean before, and it can’t be fully known the long-term effects on the marine ecosystem. The group said that deep water fish, fish at the top of the food chain, mollusks, and other filtrating sea life are most sensitive to caesium contamination.
The IRNS will maintain to monitor marine life off of Fukushima’s coastal waters due to significant pollution of the nearby seawater that could persistently see more pollution as radioactively contaminated runoff rainwater will enter the ocean.

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Status of TEPCO's Facilities and its services after the Tohoku-Chihou-Taiheiyou-Oki Earthquake (as of 3:00 pm, October 28)

Status of TEPCO's Facilities and its services after the Tohoku-Chihou-Taiheiyou-Oki Earthquake (as of 3:00 pm, October 28) | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station: Unit 1 to 3: shut down due to
the earthquake
(Units 4 to 6: outage due to regular inspections)

- At 10:00 am October 20, transportation of accumulated water from unit 3
turbine building basement to Centralized Radiation Waste Treatment
Facility (Miscellaneous Solid Waste Volume Reduction Treatment Building
[High Temperature Incinerator Building]) was started. At 9:16 am on
October 28, we stopped the transfer.

- At 9:30 am on October 28, due to the additional installment of control
valve of Unit 1 water injection line to improve controllability of water
injection, we switched water injection line into the reactor of Unit 1
and Unit 2 from normal line to emergency line. As the installment work
was finished, at 1:30 pm on the same day, we switched water injection
line from emergency line to normal line. At 2:00 pm on the same day,
accompanied by the switching of injection line, we adjusted water
injection rate from feed water system approx. 3.9㎥/h for Unit 1. We
also adjusted water injection rate from feed water system approx.
3.0㎥/h and from core spraying system approx. 7.0 ㎥/h for Unit 2.

- At 10:00 am on October 28, we started transferring low-level accumulated
water to Mega Float from a temporary tank where we had transferred from
the turbine building of Unit 6.

- With regards to accumulated water of Unit 2, for the purpose of changing
transfer route, at 9:32 am on October 28, we stopped transfer of
accumulated water from underground of turbine building of Unit 2 to
centralized radiation waste treatment facility (process main building).
At 9:54 on the same day, we changed transfer route and started transfer
of accumulated water from underground of turbine building of Unit 2 to
centralized radiation waste treatment facility (Miscellaneous Solid
Waste Volume Reduction Treatment Building)[ High Temperature Incinerator
Building]).

- At around 11:30 am on October 24, we observed the water leakage (about
20 litters) from the axis seal region of the law water pump (for 2-1
skids use) which was a constitution apparatus of the Water Desalination
Facility (RO membrane unit) 2 of the water treatment system and we
stopped the facility. Afterward, the water leakage was confirmed to be
stopped. At 2:30 pm on the same day, we stopped the line connecting to
the water pump and started other water desalinations. At 4:20 pm, the
rated flow reached 50㎥/h. Thereafter, on October 27 and 28, we
conducted replacement work of relevant pump.

- At 12:53 pm on October 28, we started up the exhaust fan of gas
management system of primary containment vessel in the reactor building
of Unit 2 and commenced commissioning.

- At around 2:20 pm on October 28, one of TEPCO's employee conducting
document check at administrative building has removed face mask when
that employee felt sick and vomit, We plan to conduct check the intake
by whole body counter. We have confirmed there was no contamination on
the face.

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131 Local Government Council Members Form Bi-Partisan Organization Devoted to Elimination of Nuclear Energy in Japan

131 Local Government Council Members Form Bi-Partisan Organization Devoted to Elimination of Nuclear Energy in Japan | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it

131  bipartisan members of local governments nationwide with a focus on nuclear power plant decommissioning have founded the "Earthquake Information Center, the primary contact Fukushima" launched, October 26, and opened the inaugural meeting in Tokyo.

The goal is to help develop and share lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, TEPCO, and support to "de-nuclear" activities to the national parliament, which will expand and local governments.

Participants reached more than 100 people in about 10 days.

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The 'funeral company' - Tepco set a new low for corporate behavior

The 'funeral company' - Tepco set a new low for corporate behavior | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
Masato Muto works for Tokyo Electric Power Co. in a rented one-story building in Fukushima Prefecture, where only a clock and a calendar hang on the office walls, and most days, only angry people come through the front door.

The prestige of working for Tepco is gone, and so are many of the perks. The company once operated resorts and sponsored clubs for employees; Muto was a running back on the football team. But since the disaster struck, Tepco has booked almost ¥2 trillion in losses.
Economists say the company will either go bankrupt — a likely scenario if its idled reactors aren't restarted — or be burdened for years over compensating evacuees and paying lenders. Either way, "it's a funeral company," said Tatsuo Hatta, an economist at Gakushuin University in Tokyo.

"I imagine a lot of rank-and-file employees feel embarrassed by management," said Jeff Kingston, author of "Contemporary Japan" and a professor at Temple University's Tokyo campus. "Most Japanese are proud to be an employee. But nobody ever bargained for this. Tepco set a new low for corporate behavior."

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Japanese Officials Deny Newer Radiation Readings and Effects - Expert: Radioactive materials from exposed melted core contaminated soil

Japanese Officials Deny Newer Radiation Readings and Effects - Expert: Radioactive materials from exposed melted core contaminated soil | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
Radioactive materials from the damaged Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant reached the Kanto region mainly via two routes, but they largely skirted the heavily populated areas of Tokyo and Kanagawa Prefecture, an expert said.

Relatively high levels of radioactive cesium were detected in soil in northern Gunma and Tochigi prefectures and southern Ibaraki Prefecture after the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant was damaged by the March 11 Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami.

Hiromi Yamazawa, a professor of environmental radiology at Nagoya University, said the first radioactive plume moved through Ibaraki Prefecture and turned northward to Gunma Prefecture between late March 14 and the afternoon of March 15.

Large amounts of radioactive materials were released during that period partly because the core of the No. 2 reactor at the Fukushima No. 1 plant was exposed.

"The soil was likely contaminated after the plume fell to the ground with rain or snow," Yamazawa said, adding that western Saitama Prefecture and western Tokyo may have been also contaminated.

Rain fell in Fukushima, Tochigi and Gunma prefectures from the night of March 15 to the early morning of March 16, according to the Meteorological Agency.

The second plume moved off Ibaraki Prefecture and passed through Chiba Prefecture between the night of March 21 and the early morning of March 22, when rain fell in a wide area of the Kanto region, according to Yamazawa's estimates.

He said the plume may have created radiation hot spots in coastal and southern areas of Ibaraki Prefecture as well as around Kashiwa, Chiba Prefecture.

Yamazawa said the plume continued to move southward, without approaching Tokyo or Kanagawa Prefecture, probably because winds flowed toward a low-pressure system south of the Boso Peninsula.

High radiation levels were detected in Minakami, Gunma Prefecture, known as a hot spring resort.

Mayor Yoshimasa Kishi said the town could be mistaken as a risky place if it decides to have radioactive materials removed.

The science ministry's map showed that 0.2 to 0.5 microsievert was detected in some locations in Niigata Prefecture.

Niigata Governor Hirohiko Izumida said the figures were likely mistaken, noting that these locations have high natural radiation levels because of granite containing radioactive materials.

Many municipalities are calling for financial support for removing radioactive materials.

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Japanese Residents Needlessly Exposed to Radiation - Tokyo ignored calls to issue iodine during crisis

Japanese Residents Needlessly Exposed to Radiation - Tokyo ignored calls to issue iodine during crisis | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
As the quake-stricken Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant was spewing radiation, the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan urged the central government to issue iodine tablets to residents in affected areas.

But Tokyo apparently ignored the advice.

At least 900 people should have been issued the medication under the NSCJ's safety standards, but the central government did not issue instructions to municipalities in Fukushima Prefecture to lessen the health risk faced by residents.

Had those people taken the tablets, they would have markedly lowered the absorption of radiation in their thyroid glands following hydrogen explosions at the No. 3 and No. 4 reactor buildings on March 14 and 15, respectively.

Early in the morning of March 13, the day after the explosion at the No. 1 reactor building, the NSCJ said it contacted the central government's crisis headquarters in Tokyo to suggest that iodine tablets be issued. The NSCJ said it discussed the issue with officials there twice via fax.

Gen Suzuki, a member of an advisory panel at the NSCJ and president of the International University of Health and Welfare, said, "I sent a statement (to the headquarters) a few times saying residents with at least 10,000 cpm of radiation should take iodine tablets."

The cpm, or counts per minute, is a measurement of radiation that is emitted per minute from radioactive substances detected on a person's body.

Later that same day, the crisis headquarters in Fukushima faxed the NSCJ a draft statement to be issued to municipal governments in the prefecture.

It made no mention of iodine tablets, the NSCJ said.

The NSCJ then repeated its advice to the headquarters in Tokyo.

The draft statement, which the NSCJ later made public, mentions the NSCJ's advice that (if radiation levels exceed certain levels) "decontaminating the person and making the person take iodine tablets are required."

"We talked to members of medical and radioactive teams involved in dealing with the aftermath of the nuclear accident, but we haven't been able to find the faxes (sent by the NSCJ)," said Kenji Matsuoka, a member of the headquarters in Tokyo and chief of the Nuclear Emergency Preparedness Division at the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, at a meeting of a task force handling this matter at the NSCJ.

Gen Suzuki, who heads a clinic at the International University of Health and Welfare, told a meeting of the Japanese Association for Medical Management of Radiation Accident (JAMMRA) in Saitama on Aug. 27 that 40 percent of people tested for internal exposure to radiation may have needed iodine tablets. The Japanese government has not instructed any residents to take iodine tablets since the start of the nuclear crisis.

"Reviewing the results of external radiation exposure tests on residents (conducted on March 17 and 18, several days after the March 11 Great East Japan Earthquake), I believe they should have taken iodine tablets at least once," he said.

Yoshio Hosoi, professor of Hiroshima University, said exposure to shorter-lived iodines should be taken into account.

"Even iodine-132, which has a half-life of only two hours, needs to be considered (as a substance to be measured)," Hosoi said.

According to a March 16 analysis on the air outside a 30-kilometer radius of the plant, radioactive iodine-132 and substances that would turn into iodine-132 in about three days accounted for at least 70 percent of airborne radiation.

The analysis was conducted by RIKEN, an independent administrative institution on scientific research, and other organizations.

The central government's panel tasked with assessing the accident at the Fukushima plant is expected to investigate the matter.

According to the prefectural government, of about 230,000 residents who underwent radiation checks at health care and evacuation centers in the prefecture since March 13, some 900 people showed readings of at least 13,000 cpm of radiation.

The 900 figure was mostly based on results made available Oct. 20.

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TEPCO Never Properly Prepared for Disaster - Unedited Fukushima accident manual released, loss of power sources not envisioned

TEPCO Never Properly Prepared for Disaster - Unedited Fukushima accident manual released, loss of power sources not envisioned | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
The government's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) released part of an unedited severe accident manual for the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant on Oct. 24, revealing that Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) had not envisioned the possibility of all power sources at the nuclear complex being lost.

TEPCO, the operator of the crippled nuclear power plant, had earlier submitted to a special House of Representatives committee largely blacked-out emergency operation manuals for the Fukushima nuclear facility. The manuals were in fact used when the Great East Japan Earthquake and ensuing tsunami struck the nuclear complex.

On Oct. 24, NISA released part of an unedited manual after submitting it to the same lower house panel. The manual revealed the fact that there was no operational manual that envisioned a loss of all power sources needed to activate emergency condensers and back-up water injection devices to cool down nuclear reactors.

The revelation highlights flaws in TEPCO's contingency plan in the event of a loss of power sources.

What was released on Oct. 24 is part of an emergency operation manual for the No. 1 reactor at the Fukushima nuclear power plant.

It shows methods of cooling down nuclear fuels as well as ways of "venting" in order to hold down pressure in the containment vessel.

NISA also released documents prepared by TEPCO that compare the operation manual and what was actually done when the crisis broke out.

According to the documents, all power sources were lost due to the effects of tsunami at 3:37 p.m. on March 11.

As a result, whether valves for emergency condensers were operating properly could not be confirmed.

Because the manual did not envision possibilities of all power sources, including batteries, being lost in the event that emergency generators and external power sources were lost, the manual itself was in fact useless when all power sources were actually lost on that day.

In September, TEPCO submitted to the lower house committee largely blacked-out manuals on the pretext of the need to protect nuclear security as part of anti-terrorism measures and intellectual property rights. NISA then ordered TEPCO to resubmit the manuals.

On Oct. 22, TEPCO said at a news conference, "After comparing the manuals, there was no problem with actual operations."

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Tepco denies wind power sale to pay Fukushima claims

Tepco denies wind power sale to pay Fukushima claims | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
Tokyo Electric Power Co is denying rumours that it is to sell a stake in a wind power company for $262 million so it can use the cash for Fukushima compensation claims.

Eurus is 60 per cent owned by Tepco and is Japan’s biggest wind power company.
A public-private advisory panel called the Nuclear Damage Compensation Facilitation Corp has been set up to draw up a plan for Tepco to pay the compensation claims that arise from Fukushima.

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Status of TEPCO's Facilities and its services (as of 3:00 pm, October 25)

Status of TEPCO's Facilities and its services (as of 3:00 pm, October 25) | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it
Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station: Unit 1 to 3: shut down due to
the earthquake
(Units 4 to 6: outage due to regular inspections)

-At 10 am on October 25, we started transferring the accumulated water,
which transferred from the turbine building of Unit 6 to the temporary
tanks, to the mega float. At 11:30 am on the dame day, we stopped
transferring.

-At 10:31 am on October 25, we started dust sampling at the opening
(blowout panel) of the reactor building of Unit 2. At 11:31 am on the
same day, we completed the sampling.

-At 11:31 am on October 25, we started dust sampling at the opening for
the equipment hatch in the reactor building of Unit 1. At 0:31 pm on the
same day, we completed the sampling.

-At 2:22 pm on October 25, since we observed reduction of water injection
volume to the reactor, we adjusted the injection volume at approx. 3.8
㎥/h.

·Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station:
Units 1 to 4: shutdown due to the earthquake

-7 monitoring posts have been installed at the border of the power station
site. We started construction (planned from October 25 to December 20) of
a permanent building for the measurement equipment, etc. of No.7 which
had been installed in the temporary building. We continue to measure
during the construction period. Since the construction work will be done
near the measurement equipment, there is a possibility that measurement
results will change to some extent due to the change of radiation
circumstance around the measurement equipment.

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Radiation effects Japanese Automobile Effects - International authorities checking imports - Dealers selling radioactive used cars in Japan

Radiation effects Japanese Automobile Effects - International authorities checking imports - Dealers selling radioactive used cars in Japan | Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear News | Scoop.it

TOKYO (majirox news) — Japanese used car dealers who can’t export radioactive cars overseas are dumping them into the Japanese used car market, according to the Asahi Shimbun on Oct. 24. These cars have failed Japan’s dockside radioactive export tests.
“What you are seeing is just the tip of the iceberg,” said one car exporter to the Asahi who refused to be identified. “If a car gives off a high radioactivity count, it’s too much trouble to decontaminate it. It’s better to just sell it in a Japanese car auction where there are no restrictions. It’s like throwing away a bad card you were dealt in poker.”

Another automobile exporter said, “I purchased a minivan for 1.23 million yen ($16,000) intending to export it to Southeast Asia. However, when it was brought to dockside and underwent radioactivity testing, it came in at 110 microsieverts, far exceeding Japan’s permissible limit of 5 microsieverts.
“After the car was refused for export, I tried over and over again to decontaminate it. The end result was that I was only able to get it down to 30 microsieverts. So I sold it at an auction in Japan. What do you expect me to do? Take a loss on it?”
Since August, regulations have been toughened up. The export limit is now 0.3 microsieverts. According to the Japan Harbor Transportation Association, as of September about 1% of all cars tested had failed the test, with a few registering over 5 microsieverts. A total of 660 cars have been refused export permission since August.

According to Yutaka Shioda, managing director of the Japan Automobile Exporters Association, “All cars being auctioned in Japan should undergo radioactivity tests.”

A Fukushima prefecture used car dealer told the Asahi, “If they have Fukushima or Iwaki number plates, we re-register the cars elsewhere in the Kanto region and then auction them.”

Masahiro Fukushi, professor of Radioactive Substances Control and Handling at Shuto University in Tokyo, says that there are genuine practical difficulties in the way of decontaminating automobiles. “While it’s easy to wash off any contamination from the exterior of the car, it’s difficult to decontaminate the seats and the interior of the automobile,” he said. “I really think that the government should put forth guidelines about permissible radioactivity levels in used cars so consumers can buy them with confidence.”

At the beginning of March, The Mainichi Daily News in Chile reported that customs agents had detected low levels of radiation on vehicles shipped from Japan.

Traces of radiation were found on 21 of the 2500 vehicles that were shipped from Yokohama. The Chilean Nuclear Commission deemed the level of radiation too low to be harmful to human health, although Chilean port workers protested, believing their safety was being put at risk.

Following months of campaigning by the Maritime Union of Australia (MUA), ARPANSA agreed to begin screening cars arriving in Australia from Japan.

“This is a win for workers, and also a win for the Australian public,” said Assistant National Secretary Warren Smith.

“Any risk of radiation is too big a risk to take. Workers and consumers come into direct contact with these cars – the Government watchdog must ensure there is no health and safety risk.”

Mr Smith said the Australian public had a right to know if there was a radiation threat.

“We’re pleased ARPANSA have recognised that this is an important health and safety issue, and will be screening the next batch of cars being imported from Japan,” he said.

The MUA is currently working towards radiation screening for all Japanese cargo entering Australia.

In April and May alone, more than 44,600 vehicles that were produced in Japan were registered in Australia.

In Australia back in June, a News Limited report revealed that 700 Toyota vehicles and 100 other cars exported from Yokohama would be analysed by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) when the cargo ship Trans Future 7 docks at Port Kembla in Wollongong. Of particular interest to the Australian officials were 30 used vehicles, which may not have been subjected to the same level of safety testing and scrutiny in Japan as brand new vehicles.

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