Fuji X-Pro2
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Fuji X-Pro2 firmware update solves reset problem

Fuji X-Pro2 firmware update solves reset problem | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
Fuji have this morning announced a new firmware version for the X-Pro2, to address the issue reported here and elsewhere of fresh-out-of-the-box camera bodies losing most of their user settings. This issue, irritating though not fatal, has cast a shadow over the otherwise successful launch of the eagerly-awaited successor to the X-Pro1. Fuji remains tight-lipped about the actual causes of the issue, although they had previously advised that a fully-charged battery should remain in place for at least 24 hours before use. I and many others reported the problem once, although some apparently experienced similar symptoms twice or more. Speculation centred around a slow-to-charge capacitor but no confirmation has been forthcoming. You can find the firmware fix to download here. The release notes simply state: The firmware update Ver. 1.01 from Ver.1.00 incorporates the following issues: The phenomenon is fixed that in rare cases, established customized menu settings are reset to factory default setting when the camera is turned off. Improvement of image quality when shooting in the long exposure mode. I shall install on my own camera, of course even though I met the problem only once and recommend that all existing users do the same, even though Fuji do follow the laudable practice of rolling up fixes into subsequent releases, removing the need for multiple installs to get up to the current level. I expect that based on past experience this will be the first of a number of updates we shall see to the X-Pro2 in line with Fuji's kaizen philosophy. Let's hope that the next can just focus on making an excellent camera even better!
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Michael Gane's curator insight, April 4, 5:10 AM

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Fujifilm X-Pro2 Digital Camera Review

Fujifilm X-Pro2 Digital Camera Review | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
Performance A lot has changed in the world of mirrorless cameras since the launch of the X-Pro1 and Fujifilm has baked those lessons into the X-Pro2. Performance has received a big upgrade this time around, with a new 24-megapixel X-Trans CMOS III sensor, 273 on-sensor autofocus points, an expanded ISO range, 1080/60p video, and improved AF tracking. These new additions have turned the X-Pro2 into one of the most powerful rangefinders that we've tested to date. Let's start with the new sensor. Lately Fujifilm has been using a 16-megapixel X-Trans sensor, but the X-Pro2 steps it up to a new 24.3MP sensor–putting it on par with most other cameras in its price range. The new sensor also extends the ISO range out a bit, with a native range of 200-12,800. You can expand that to 100-51,200 as well, though ISO 100 is only available when shooting JPEG. While a base ISO of 200 can be worrisome, we found it was relatively noise-free and razor sharp. The new processor is also worth a shout out, as it delivers a much snappier experience than previous Fujifilm cameras, from startup to continuous shooting. There is a bit of lag when shooting RAW images before you can preview the shot, but nothing that should seriously disrupt workflow. With a class 10 SDHC card, we were able to get around 83 shots at 8.5 frames per second (fps), right in line with what Fuji claims. That's pretty impressive for a rangefinder–and more than enough for most users. Autofocus speeds were a frankly terrible on the original X-Pro1. Fuji did what it could to fix that after the camera's launch with firmware updates, but it never really got to a reliable place. While we don't test AF speeds in our lab, it's plain to see that the X-Pro2 is significantly faster than its predecessor. Moving subjects still pose a problem, but as I've stated, most people aren't using rangefinders to capture particularly fast-moving subjects. Both color and white balance were also exceptional, with Pro Neg. Hi and custom white balance producing accurate, pleasing colors. There are plenty of other color modes to choose from, such as the over-saturated Velvia or the more subdued Classic Chrome. Auto white balance handled daylight extremely well, but did struggle a little in both fluorescent and incandescent light. I'd recommend sticking with RAW images so white balance can be adjusted easily in post. Video is something that Fuji has struggled to master across its entire lineup. However, the X-Pro2 shows signs of real progress with significantly less moiré than the last few Fujis. At 1080/60p, the video was sharp and popped in a pleasing way. High frequencies will still produce some discoloration, but in the real world it's more likely to be a fringe occurrence.
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Using the X-Pro2 in a Portrait Session | Ian MacDonald

Using the X-Pro2 in a Portrait Session | Ian MacDonald | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
Note:  This is part four of a five part review series on the soon to be released Fuji X-Pro2: Part One:  Unboxing and First Impressions Part Two:  Low light autofocus and high ISO Part Three:  Cityscapes, long exposures and street photography Part Four: Portraiture  Part Five:  Final thoughts Hello again! Part four of this series will… I wanted to test the X-Pro2 under as many different situations as I possibly could though, so I contacted a close friend (and beautiful model) who I shoot with often and we spent a few hours making some portraits….. Source: ianmacdonaldphotography.com 0 FLARES Twitter 0Facebook 0Google+ 0Pin It Share 0Filament.io Made with Flare More Info'> Related Posts: Fuji X-Pro2 Review Part One: Unboxing and First Impressions | Ian MacDonald Fuji X-Pro2 Review Part Three: Vancouver Cityscapes, Long Exposures, and Street Photography | Ian MacDonald Fujifilm X-Pro 2 Hands-On Preview | ePhotoZine Shooting Fashion with the Fuji X-Pro2 | Nathan Elson Fujifilm X-Pro2 hands-on preview: Is evolution enough for this flagship pro? | Pocket-lint
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My Venice and the X-Pro2 - Part 2: The Carnival

My Venice and the X-Pro2 - Part 2: The Carnival | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
JOIN MORE THAN 8,000 OTHER FUJI LOVERS Subscribe to our newsletter and have all the Fuji X goodness regularly delivered straight into your mailbox.
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Waleed Shah: Fujifilm X-Pro2 Review

Waleed Shah: Fujifilm X-Pro2 Review | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
It’s always nice when Fuji calls and says, “Hey, wanna test out a new product?” This time it was the X-Pro2. I only had it for a week though so this is not such an intense review… just my thoughts and opinions around using it for a very short time. The first thing I noticed when I held it was that it’s bigger and heavier than the X-T1…. yes, I forgot to mention, I shoot with an X-T1 most of the time. The second thing I noticed was that the diopter has markings to show which setting is zero and which way is positive and negative. I love that because sometimes I don’t trust my own eyes. So I need someone to tell me what’s zero. An hour after receiving it, I’d gone down to see Paul from Organic Beard Co. to shoot some product shots for his website…. and that was the first time I actually looked through the viewfinder….. The Optical View Finder (OVF) is great at first look. I love how you can see what’s outside the frame. It took some getting used to at first. The switch between OVF and EVF (Electronic View Finder) is fantastic. I located at the front of the camera where your fingers can easily find it without taking your eye away from the view finder. Great how you can switch so fast. The EVF is gorgeous and makes photos look better than they actually are. There’s a plus and a minus to this. It’s impressive at first look and you can impress whoever is with you (clients) by having them look in the EVF after you take the shot. Also, it gives you an idea of how awesome the shot can be after you do a little post production. The downside is that because it’s so good, you may settle for a mediocre photo just because your impressed by what you see the the EVF. So beware. (I later learned that you can change how bright the EVF is its not overwhelmingly awesome) One thing about the OVF is that it’s no good when attaching a macro lens. That was obvious to me AFTER I tried to use it. Lol. But hey, it’s all good… Just switch to EVF when shooting macro. No biggie. I didn’t realize how much I needed the tilt screen until I didn’t have one. I needed it for a lot of what I do. For example, with product shots, when shooting from vertically above the items, I usually tilt the screen down and because the camera is above my head. Same thing with crowd shots a a concert. The camera is above my head. So…. Tilt screen…. I need it. The autofocus did fail me a few times with the OVF I must say. If it’s a small or thin subject, even if the subject is in the the autofocus square, and even when I made the square bigger or smaller, it still missed it and focused on the background. However, when I switched to EVF…. That didn’t happen. I can’t explain why…. Still wondering actually…. But yeah…. That happened. My favorite feature must be the little pad to change the focus points. I LOOOOVE that. With my XT1 I had change all my direction keys to be initiate changing the focus point. With that pad it frees up those buttons to do other things. Here are a couple of shots from the the product shoot….. Oh… and Paul (Organic Beard Co.) shares a warehouse with the dude called Christian who sells classic looking bicycles… here’s a shot of one of them. So… I then realized that this camera would probably do best on the streets. Its got that “charm” to it with the ISO dial the way it is and a stealth factor with it being all black. So…. though I’d take a trip down to the fish market in Abu Dhabi. All photos in this segment are shot on the Acros Pro Film Simulation with a Green Filter… I had the Grain effect on strong. I added a bit of contrast and clarity in post…. oh.. and raised the blacks for a faded look… Final thoughts… well… I gotta say, this one isn’t for me… Don’t get me wrong through… its a phenomenal camera. If you had to choose between the X-Pro2 and the X-T1 I would go with the X-T1 UNLESS: 1. You absolutely need those extra megapixels 2. You’re totally a range finder kinda photographer 3. The lack of tilt screen doesn’t bother you at all Other than that… performance almost identical, and the “swag” factor is comparable as well…. Hope this was helpful… and shout out to Fuji for making another great camera…. Other random Images:
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Fuji X-PRO 2: The complete review with everything we know so far

Fuji X-PRO 2: The complete review with everything we know so far | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
The official Fuji X-Pro 2 camera body has been announced and there are a few pre-production bodies out in the wild among Fuji X shooters, but the official release version of the camera is yet to be seen.  The camera is set to be shipped on February 28, 2016.  I haven’t yet laid hands on the camera, but I’ve put a few hours into finding every little thing available so far from those who have. If you’re one of the more than 1 million regular readers of Improve Photography, you already know that I ditched Nikon and switched to Fuji last year.  Since then, dozens or hundreds of Improve Photography readers have also made the switch, partially because I’m always gushing about my Fuji gear.  So sorry if I sound like a fanboy in this post.  Maybe it’s because I am. But for the record, I also own a Canon and Nikon camera body that I use for testing new lenses.  So I’m not THAT impartial This article is being updated on an almost daily basis as new information becomes available.  I’ll also be putting together a series of Youtube videos as soon as the camera is out.  Subscribe to my Youtube channel so you don’t miss them. OVERVIEW The Fuji X Pro 2 is a gorgeous-looking retro-style camera that puts almost all of its attention to still photographers who want the control, and ease of shooting that the body provides. The body includes all the high-end features you’d expect on a flagship camera: wi-fi, 1/8000 shutter speed, 1/250 sync speed, excellent low light specs, weather sealing, and a solid magnesium-alloy body. When it comes right down to it, there are only two significant drawbacks to the camera from what I can see: (1) No tilting LCD screen, and (2) a relatively short battery life that will require the photographer to carry multiple batteries. This is one of the first mirrorless cameras that can replace a DSLR for 99% of photographers.  It still isn’t the right camera for photographers who shoot pro sports (there’s no 400mm f/4 on the Fuji system), but other than that, it’s tough to think of a photography situation where the X Pro 2 would be a bad choice. SPECS 24.3 megapixel sensor Hybrid rangefinder and EVF viewfinder 273 autofocus points, with 77 cross type AF points Dual SD card slots Built in Wi-fi Tremendous controls on the camera: Joystick for AF, separate dials for ISO aperture and shutter, 6 customizable function buttons, etc. Weather sealed Max shutter speed 1/8000 physical or 1/32000 electronic shutter.  1/25o flash sync speed. 1080p/60 video 8fps with a huge buffer ISO 100 to 51,200 THE VIEWFINDER: INCLUDING THE BIG MYTH The Fuji X Pro 2’s most unique feature is that it has a rangefinder-style viewfinder.  Rather, I should more correctly say that the Fuji X Pro 2 CAN HAVE a rangefinder style viewfinder.  This is something that I didn’t explain well when I discussed it on the most recent episode of the podcast and I got some people confused. For those of you who didn’t shoot a rangefinder film camera, a rangefinder viewfinder basically means that you see out through the camera body through a little window and NOT through the lens.  The viewfinder shows lines in the window showing where the edges of the frame are as you zoom in and out, but you can see wider than what the lens is seeing. This works quite well when shooting landscapes or street photography where you want to see what’s in the frame and what’s slightly out of it so you can decide if you want to include it.  However, it’s a disaster for sports and wildlife photographers, who use long lenses.  You’d see a very wide image through the viewfinder, and then a tiny little box in the middle of the frame showing where the frame of the picture is through the lens. Here’s where the myth comes in!  I’m sure this scares off a lot of photographers.  It did to me as well until I understood it better.  This is not a traditional rangefinder camera.  Yes, this view is available, and I actually expect it to be quite handy when shooting wide, but it ALSO has a normal EVF (Electronic viewfinder) for shooting just like you’d see if you were to shoot with an XT1.  There’s a little lever on the front of the camera to the left of the viewfinder window that allows you to switch between normal EVF mode and this rangefinder mode.  So you CAN use the X Pro 2 with a normal viewfinder in addition to the rangefinder mode if you choose to use it. But there’s one other mode available for the viewfinder–hybrid mode.  The hybrid mode is pretty unique.  It shows a traditional rangefinder view, but also a little popout at the bottom right of the screen showing a tiny image preview. The refresh rate on the Fuji viewfinders that I’ve tested are the best in the market.  There is almost no perceptible lag, and word on the street is that the lag will be reduced even more on the new Fuji X Pro 2. The EVF is actually slightly smaller than the one on the XT1, but it has a higher resolution to show greater detail. Bert Stephani pointed out on Youtube that he likes the viewfinder placement on the X Pro 2.  Because it is way off in the corner of the camera, your face doesn’t contact the LCD screen as much and most of your face is not covered by the camera so you can more easily communicate with your portrait subjects without hiding behind the camera.  Another benefit to the viewfinder placement is that you’re less likely to bump the eye detection sensor accidentally, which switches the view from LCD to viewfinder. UPDATE on January 29, 2016: It was first rumored that the X Pro 2 would not adapt the optical viewfinder to adjust to new lenses (being more zoomed in when using a long lens).  This is not true.  The feature IS in the X Pro 2, so using long lenses won’t be so ridiculous  Thanks to the commenter below that pointed it out to me. SHUTTER SPEED (AND THAT INTERESTING SHUTTER DIAL) The max physical shutter speed of the X Pro 2 is 1/8000.  That’s actually quite nice to have.  When I’m shooting on a bright day but want to achieve a shallow depth of field with an f/2.8 lens, I need the 1/8000 shutter speed to cut out more light. One of the biggest improvements to this body is that the flash sync speed is now 1/250.  This is a very welcome change for flash photographers like myself who need to cut out more light so a faster aperture can be used, or to freeze motion in brightly lit areas.  The sync speed of the previous model was an annoying 1/180.  On the shutter speed dial, the max flash sync speed is marked with an x after the number. Within the shutter speed dial is the subset ISO dial.  By lifting up the edges of the shutter speed dial and twisting, you can see the ISO change.  There is a little plastic window on the shutter dial that shows the ISO.  I’m not convinced that this is better than the separate ISO dial on the XT1, but I’m at least glad to see that there are separate dials for shutter, aperture (on the lens), and ISO.  I would have freaked out if Fuji had removed the ISO dial entirely. SPEED Fuji really went crazy with the processor in this camera, which should hopefully improve the responsiveness and snappiness of what I would already consider to be a good menu system on the Fuji cameras.  The new processor is quad core. The camera is capable of shooting a respectable 8 frames per second, which makes this camera appropriate for even casual sports and wildlife shooters like myself. The buffer on the X Pro 2 is really huge.  I’ve searched around and can’t confirm a specific number of raw files that it can do, but I heard a loooooooong burst on some of the pre-production models from other photographers. IMAGE QUALITY AND LOW LIGHT PERFORMANCE The X Pro 2 does not utilize a low pass filter which will, in theory, produce sharper photos.  I heard several comments from official Fuji X shooters who got a pre-production version of the camera that the Jpeg images were surprisingly sharp, but that really doesn’t mean much.  A sharp JPEG could just mean that the camera applied more post-shot sharpening to the file. The minimum ISO is 100, which is a welcomed change from the XT1’s minimum shutter speed of ISO 200, which was disappointing for landscape photographers who often need to cut out more light to get a longer shutter speed without using filters. On the high end of the ISO specs, I’ve always respected that Fuji advertises much more reasonable high ISO capabilities of its cameras than the other manufacturers.  Canon is the worst about this.  They’ll advertise a max native ISO that is sometimes 3 full stops above what would ever be considered usable.  With the Fuji system, you still wouldn’t want to shoot at the max ISO, but it’s usually a lot closer to reality.  So don’t take the max ISO number of a Fuji camera and use it to determine how well it will do in low light.  The only way to know is to test it for yourself. I was really nervous about the low light performance of the Fuji line of cameras when I considered switching over from my Nikon D810 full frame camera.  I’d always heard that mirrorless cameras don’t do well in low light, and when I tested the micro 4/3 offerings from Panasonic and Olympus, I wasn’t pleased.  But I was AMAZED at how well my Fuji XT1 did with low light.  I regularly shoot night photography with my Fuji XT1 and it holds its own against my full frame cameras.  It’s not AS good, but it’s close. The other thing to realize about the X Pro 2 and all of the other Fuji cameras that I’ve tested is that they are completely ISO invariant.  Click that link to read my article explaining clearly what ISO invariance is.  It’s really quite interesting.  But basically it means that it doesn’t matter if you set the camera to 1600 to properly expose in camera, or if you shoot at ISO 100 (producing a very dark picture) and then bring up the exposure later.  You’ll get the same result.  It’s actually a very useful technology that you DON’T find in most of the Canon and Nikon bodies. BUILD QUALITY & BODY FEATURES Weather sealing is an excellent feature to see added to this camera body.  I’ll be interested to do a tear down or wait until someone else tears down this camera to see how well the weather sealing is done, though.  Not all weather sealing is the same.  Sometimes it’s just a glorified term for putting in a few 2 cent rubber gaskets, and sometimes it means the camera has been designed from the ground up to make it tough and weather proof. The buttons on the camera are much higher quality.  Many of the previous Fuji cameras have very plasticy, clicky buttons.  Fuji has made the buttons softer to the touch and added a little travel to the buttons.  The spinning dials on the camera are made out of cross-hatched metal, which looks really cool. One major disappointment on the Fuji X Pro 2 is that the LCD is not articulating or even tiltable.  Why in the WORLD are camera manufacturers continually releasing cameras with fixed LCD screens?  It’s incredibly useful to have a tiltable LCD screen and I’m disappointed that Fuji didn’t include on in this camera.  In fact, this is the #1 most disappointing feature in this camera in my opinion. By far, the most disappointing miss on the Fuji X Pro 2 is that there is no tilting LCD screen. Jim Harmer But at least the X Pro 2 includes dual SD card slots, which is an excellent choice.  Nikon and Canon keep releasing cameras with two different cards (XQD + SD, or CF + SD, for example). Unlike the X Pro 1, the X Pro 2 has a tripod socket on the bottom of the camera that is centered with the lens.  This is an excellent choice as it makes it much easier to shoot panoramas. This body also has a beefier magnesium alloy frame that is just slightly larger than the previous version.  That’s actually a welcomed change as far as most photographers are concerned, who sometimes find the Fuji cameras too small for their hands.  It also has a chunkier grip for the right hand. The camera uses the same NP-W126 battery as the X Pro 1, Fuji XT1, Fuji XT10, and most of the other Fuji X cameras.  This is a disappointment as this battery is underpowered.  However, I bought 7 of this third party battery for my XT1 (works in the X Pro 2 as well) that lasts much longer.  This third-party battery is 1500 mAh instead of just 1260 mAh on the official Fuji battery.  Oh, and it costs 1/4 the price!  Those batteries have been great! AUTOFOCUS The X Pro 2 includes a ridiculous, fat, huge, monstrous number of autofocus points–273.  Yup.  273.  And they cover just about every nook and cranny of the screen.  I love that they aren’t all concentrated in the middle.  77 of the focus points are phase detection autofocus points.  Phase detection means that the autofocus point can tell the lens if it needs to push out, or in to get proper focus, instead of requiring the lens to hunt back and forth until focus is found.  The number of autofocus points is staggering, and welcomed. Selecting an autofocus point can sometimes take too long if you have too many points to choose from.  Fortunately, the camera allows for the points to be grouped so you can quickly move to a region of autofocus points and then zoom into that region to pick a specific point. Fuji XT1 users and users of many other Fuji cameras, are familiar with the requirement to press the down button on the four-way selector, and then you can move around your autofocus point.  The X Pro 2 makes this a much quicker process by including a joystick on the back of the camera so that the focus point can be moved around much more quickly.  This is the first time I’ve seen an autofocus joystick on a mirrorless camera. The speed of the autofocus remains to be seen, and that’s a subjective measurement.  The XT1 was never faster than a DSLR, but after the version 4 firmware update, I wouldn’t call it “slow” either.  I even had reasonable success photographing a college football game with it.  I’d love to see an improvement in the autofocus speed, which it’s rumored to have improved dramatically, but I can’t comment on this until the camera is in my hands since this IS a subjective measurement. You can measure the autofocus speed scientifically, but the real speed depends dramatically on the situation, the autofocus target, the specific lens used, etc. WEIGHT (AND THE REAL WEIGHT OF THE SYSTEM) The weight of the camera is a huge draw for me.  Weight was the thing that pushed me away from my D810 in the first place.  Given that I travel to shoot with readers of Improve Photography around the world about 10 times a year, I need a camera system that won’t break my back after backpacking through the mountains, traveling throughout rural China, chasing the light in Iceland, and hiking through the forests in Costa Rica.  The full frame DSLR systems (INCLUDING the A7RII which is actually NOT lighter than full frame DSLRs), were too heavy. I’m slightly sad to see that the Fuji X Pro 2 gained just a little weight, but it’s not significant (only 40 grams heavier than the previous version).  To put that in perspective, the new version is only the weight of one of those tiny boxes of Sunmaid raisins. The real weight numbers to pay attention to when buying into a camera system are not just the weight of the camera, but the weight of comparable lenses.  This is what convinced me not to buy a Sony A7RII.  The A7RII itself is lightweight, but Sony doesn’t yet make a trinity of f/2.8 lenses.  If you compare the weight of the Sony f/4 lenses against the Nikon or Canon f/4 lenses, you see that you really don’t lose any weight by switching to Sony’s full frame mirrorless system. The below little comparison of my D810 and my Fuji XT1 when I switched was one of the biggest reasons for switching.  Fuji is WAY less money and WAY lighter.  But the weight argument will appeal to some photographers (especially those who travel, hike, or shoot day-long weddings), but not as much to other photographers who don’t have to haul around their gear. VIDEO The Fuji X PRO 2 does not include a 4k recording capabilities, which is a little bit of a let down for a camera in this price range, but frankly isn’t too surprising given the fact that Fuji has never really gone crazy with video features. The X Pro 2 does include a microphone port, but it is a 2.5mm port and not a more standard 3.5mm port, so you’ll need to get an adapter for most of your mics.  The good news is that it only costs a couple bucks. THE LENS SYSTEM (AND MY FAVORITE FUJI LENSES) The Fuji lens system is excellent, in my opinion.  Coming from the famous Nikkor glass, I was not let down one tiny bit by the lens system available in the Fuji line. If I were buying a Fuji today, these would be my personal picks for the lenses to get. Fuji 10-24mm for your wide angle landscape shooting.  Since I’m primarily a landscape photographer, this is my most-used lens. Fuji 16-55mm lens for tighter landscapes or environmental portraits.  This is similar to the focal range of a 24-70 in DSLR world. Fuji 50-140 for tighter portraiture.  This is the equivalent of a 70-200, and this lens does NOT disappoint! Fuji 100-400mm.  This is the brand new wildlife and sports lens for the Fuji system.  It’s been announced but isn’t shipping yet. With this lineup of lenses, there really isn’t a photography situation that you couldn’t shoot. Because Fuji has not made a camera with more than 16 megapixels until now, I’m curious to test the Fuji lens lineup with higher resolution cameras, which are more likely to show any faults in the glass.  So far, though, I’ve been totally satisfied with the Fuji lens lineup. SENSOR SIZE (AND WHY I PREFER APS-C) Personally, I love the APS-C sensor size.  I missed it almost immediately when I “upgraded” to my first full frame camera years ago.  While full frame has some benefits of low light performance, the difference is a lot less in real life than you’d expect. I like the APS-C cameras because I get a longer focal range on my long lenses for when I’m shooting sports and wildlife, but on the wide end, I can get the exact same wideness as with a full frame camera because the wide angle lenses for APS-C cameras go to lower focal lengths (the 10-24 is a popular wide angle for the Fuji, but there is no rectilinear 10mm lens for full frame cameras.  You’ll usually shoot a 16-35, in which case the field of view is the same). I also like APS-C cameras because the lenses are smaller as well, which makes the whole system significantly lighter.  That’s a big factor for me since I do so much traveling to shoot around the world. DxO Mark doesn’t test the Fuji cameras because their unique sensor technology does not work with their testing setup.  So all the tests you’ll see of the Fuji  sensors will be more real life.  That’s fine with me.  I’ve never found the tests from DxO Mark to line up with what I’m experiencing in real world scenarios. WHAT TO EXPECT IF YOU’RE SWITCHING TO FUJI OR ORDERING THE X PRO 2 The first thing I noticed when I switched to Fuji is how much better colors look coming straight out of the camera, and in my raw files.  The files look much more like Canon raw files than Nikon raw files.  I was used to the dull look of Nikon colors until I switched to Fuji and remembered how nice it is to get the colors looking more natural right out of the camera without doing any work. Low light performance is likely quite a bit better than you’re expecting.  This was the thing that I was really nervous about before switching, but as soon as I did my own real-world low light testing, I was pleasantly surprised with my Fuji XT1, and the X Pro 2 promises to be even better.  I have no problems shooting the milky way or other night photography situations. Extremely configurable.  There are six function buttons on the camera, which is awesome, in addition to the quick menu which is also fully configurable, and on top of that, there is yet another configurable menu called “my menu” where you can add up to 16 of your most-used functions.  Handy! Update on January 27, 2016: Usually when you buy a new camera, it takes about 6 weeks for Adobe to update the software with the necessary RAW support for the new camera.  This is extremely annoying for new camera users who sometimes have to shoot in JPG or convert to DNG until Adobe updates the software.  The good news as of today is that Lightroom as already announced the support for the X Pro 2, so you’ll be able to open your files in Lightroom as soon as you get the camera.  (Thanks to Tim Evans and Ernst Haas who alerted me to this in the comments today). PRE-ORDERING THE FUJI X PRO 2 I always pre-order my cameras through Amazon.  You can Pre-Order the X Pro 2 here.  For me they have been reliable in getting me the camera fast because they have ridiculously awesome shipping.  If you click that link right now and then if you decide to actually place your order later, I’ll get a 4% commission which helps to pay the direct costs of producing these in-depth reviews, and it doesn’t cost you anything extra. You can also pre-order through B&H right here (Affiliate link).  The price is the same through both retailers. Another option is to pre-order through your local camera store.  It’s happened more than a few times that I’ve seen cameras that were back ordered for MONTHS on Amazon and B&H which a local camera store would have in stock immediately.  I haven’t seen any backordering for the X Pro 2 where the estimated shipping date is anything other than the February release date, so I’m not sure this will be necessary for the X Pro 2.  But it’s a good tip to know when you’re pre-ordering the 5D Mark IV later this year.
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Fujifilm X-Pro2 | My Initial Thoughts On Fuji’s New Flagship Body

Fujifilm X-Pro2 | My Initial Thoughts On Fuji’s New Flagship Body | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
When Fuji first announced their X-Pro2 camera, you could almost hear the sighs of relief from the Fuji faithful who have been waiting to see what Fuji’s next-generation sensor would hold. I received my review sample of the X-Pro 2 last week, just a few days before they started shipping, and having had the weekend to play around with it pretty extensively, I am here today to share some of my initial thoughts. [RELATED: FUJI X-PRO 2 ANNOUNCED] INITIAL THOUGHTS ON FUJI’S X-PRO 2 I would be lying if I said I was not incredibly excited to get a chance to review this camera. I absolutely loved my X-T1 before jumping ship over to Sony, and I have been patiently keeping an eye on what Fuji has been doing, just waiting for an excuse get back into their system. The X-Pro 2 feels like a quality camera, but goodness this thing is lightweight. Even compared to my a7R II, I found myself surprised by just how light it is; especially with the lens that was provided for me to use with the X-Pro 2, the 27mm F/2.8.   I had forgotten just how beautiful the colors coming out of the Fuji are, and the X-Pro 2 is no different. Simply put, they are unmatched. As far as the handling of the camera goes, I don’t have many complaints so far beyond a handful of things. First, the exposure compensation dial is a little too easy to bump in my opinion. In my shooting, I found that I was constantly having to check it to make sure that I had not bumped it and changed my exposure comp. Similarly, the other dial that is a little too easy to bump (in my opinion) is the diopter for the viewfinder. There were a couple of times where I would pull the camera up to my eye and find that my entire display was not clear. Beyond that, the buttons and dials all worked perfectly. I absolutely loved the 2-in-1 ISO/Shutter dial. It really gives off the vintage/retro feel that so many Fuji shooters love.   As part of this first weekend with the X-Pro 2, I was able to attend the season opener for the MLS defending champion Portland Timbers on Sunday. I did a rather rash thing and decided to shoot the match with only the X-Pro 2 and the 27mm F/2.8 (which gives roughly a 40mm FF equivalent field of view). I honestly was not expecting much, given the reputation mirrorless has for being less than ideal for sports. Surprisingly, even with a very ‘non’ sports lens like the 27mm, the X-Pro performed admirably. Its 8 FPS max burst mode was plenty to capture the action (what little of it was close enough to me to be worth shooting), and the AF did a pretty good job of tracking subjects.   Both of the shots you see above are reactions from the Timbers players having just scored a goal. Now, I certainly would not recommend shooting sports with the XF 27mm if you can help it. I am sure that I would have had some much better shots had I had the 50-140mm with me. But given my limitations on gear for the shoot, I was really impressed with how the X-Pro 2 performed. That said, it was not all rainbows and unicorns at the game. Being as I only had a review unit, I only had one battery, and before halftime, I was already getting the low battery warning. This meant that I was turning my camera off until I wanted to shoot (which worked thanks to the X-Pro 2’s incredibly fast boot up time). So, battery life is still a big issue for the X-Pro 2, unfortunately.   There was also a few cases of the AF just totally missing; something that is fairly rare in my experience with shooting sports with DSLRs, but that said, overall, this was the best sports shooting experience I have had with a mirrorless camera yet. A big part of that was thanks to the AF joystick which made it super easy to switch between focus points and honestly, it felt like I was using a DSLR. I absolutely love that feature.   Overall, this first weekend with the X-Pro 2 has been a good one. I look forward to playing with it for a few more weeks before finishing up my review. So far here is what I have liked and disliked about the X-Pro 2: LIKE SO FAR Colors Dual ISO/Shutter Speed dial AF joystick AF tracking (Not perfect, but very usable) Burst rate (8 FPS) OVF overlay DISLIKE SO FAR Battery life Exposure Comp dial Diopter dial EVF exposure RAW performance in Lightroom is still less than ideal OVF AF overlay is confusing at first The X-Pro 2 has begun shipping now from retailers all across the globe. If you are interested in picking one up for yourself, you can head on over to B&H here. As I mentioned in last week’s deal report, you can save $100 if you grab one with the 35mm F/2. Before I go, here are a few more sample shots. I would love to answer some of your questions about the X-Pro 2 in my review, so if you have any concerns, thoughts, or questions about Fuji’s latest flagship, please leave a comment below and I will try and answer as many of them as I can!
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Every Single Acros Film Simulation With The Fuji X-Pro2 - DIY Photography

Every Single Acros Film Simulation With The Fuji X-Pro2 - DIY Photography | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
Here are 42 photographs taken from a recent bridal collection shoot. I’ve shared them to show how I process my monochrome images using the new Acros film simulation from Fujifilm. Please feel free to read or just browse the pictures for ideas and inspiration. Acros film simulation showing wonderful tonal gradation The shoot: A commercial bridal fashion shoot for advertising, editorial and web use Client: Abigail Westrup Bridal Makeup and hair: Vicki Waghorn Model: Victoria Bond Location: Clevedon Hall Photographer: Damien Lovegrove Camera: Fujifilm X-Pro2 with XF90mm lens – All pictures were captured in RAW and processed in Lightroom I shot in RAW and used the Pro Neg S film simulation with H tone set to -1, S tone set to -1, Sharpness set to -2, Noise reduction set to -3 and the White balance set to K and carefully adjusted for each set up. The White balance is the only element that gets transferred to the RAW processing engine however the other factors give me the perfect image on the camera LCD to enable me to set the lighting contrast and exposure. ACROS FILM SIMULATION Of the four Acros film simulations available in the latest generation of Fuji X cameras Acros G is the one I use for portraits. The benefits of using Acros G over Acros, Acros R and Acros B for portraits is skin contrast is higher and the lips are more clearly defined irrespective of skin colour. Acros R tends to make skin blemish free but also ghostly and lacking in lustre, and Acros B just looks a bit blotchy. For landscapes, the R and B options are very popular and for street and architecture the regular Acros is generally considered the best. ACROS G VERSUS B G Acros G has a slightly steeper curve in the mid tones giving a touch more visual contrast than B g. My process for working with B g is to get the colour image right using Pro Neg S then make a virtual copy and switch camera profiles to B g before adding a touch of contrast. Now with Across I don’t need the last bit. That’s the obvious bit but there is also some alchemy going on at pixel level too. Acros G is more refined, it delivers more acutance than B g and this is a look that I like very much indeed. BACKGROUND I spent 16 years working as a professional photographer processing my black and white negatives and then hand printing every photograph. For the final 4 years of my film life I had a darkroom technician to do the work with me because by that time we were shooting 30+ rolls of film each week. I went completely digital in 2001 when I bought a pair of Fujifilm S1 cameras and I have never looked back since. THE LESSONS I LEARNED FROM FILM The main thing I learned when shooting film is to be consistent. I started by testing every film that was available and I narrowed down my shortlist. I got to know the one or two films I was going to shoot on a regular basis really well so I could predict the look at the shoot and establish a house style. Then I tested and measured each emulsion through experimentation to discover the ideal formula for processing the negatives to achieve the kind of look I was after. One film I used in 35mm cameras (Nikon F100) was Fuji Neopan 1600. I rated it at ISO 800 and processed it in Ilford ID11 developer at 1:1 for 7 ¼ minutes at 24°. This gave me great prints at grade 2 on my LPL enlarger. I then adjusted the printing settings to optimise for each negative. On digital I’ve done almost exactly the same process by testing every film simulation on offer before settling on the two that I’m going to use. I nearly always use Pro Neg S for colour and I use Acros G for black and white (X-Pro2) (B g on X-T1). Even when I’m shooting black and white I set my colour image first in camera ensuring the white balance and tone are spot on in each new scene before I switch to Acros G or B g for the shoot. There is a trend at the moment for some wedding photographers to pump in contrast and make monochrome pictures ‘pop’ or ‘punchy’. The problem is this will become a dated just like the ‘vintage look’ that was popular a few years back with it’s yellow tinted skies and washed out shadows. HDR is already passed it’s best in a lot of peoples eyes. The good news with the Fujifilm simulations available in X series cameras is they are beautiful, calm and timeless. Classic Chrome is the exception and it’s interesting to note that it never got a Fuji emulsion name because Fuji transparency film was always better than that, and reproduced colours more faithfully than CC. Although most of my cameras have the Classic Chrome film simulation available I find it a bit too ‘Instagram’ for my taste. My advice is get a look that is right for you, get to know it well and make it your own. If, like me, you shoot for commercial clients from time to time, having a clean, pure look in your tool kit is definitely worthwhile too. THE PROCESS Set up your camera LCD/ EVF to ensure you are seeing accurate exposure and colour saturation. Spend time to test each film simulation to determine the ones that work best for you and your subject. Adjust the highlight and shadow tone settings to give an accurate representation of your final look. DURING THE SHOOT Set the camera to your regular colour film simulation, and set the white balance for the scene. Switch to Acros film simulation or your regular monochrome film simulation as and when required. Always have the correct white balance before switching to a monochrome film simulation. If you are shooting in a fast changing environment switch to Auto WB. Use the camera screen to asses the lighting contrast and adjust the lighting as required. Get it right in camera. If you resort to a lot of slidery in Lightroom you will have lost the delicate, subtle, effect of the film simulation. IN LIGHTROOM Set the film simulation to the same one that you used at the shoot and make final tweaks to the pictures before exporting. Tip: I have set my Lightroom defaults to set the Pro Neg S film simulation automatically for all pictures taken my Fuji X cameras. HOW TO BATCH PROCESS A SET OF MONOCHROME IMAGES IN LIGHTROOM Get all the images looking perfect in colour. Spot healed, white balanced, gradiented, brushed and renamed etc. Switch to Library and select grid view. Select all the pictures and press Cmd & apostrophe to create virtual copies. Keeping the original selection switch to Develop. Set the picture on screen to the new monochrome film simulation Across or B etc. Sync settings and choose just Camera Calibration and Process Version. You now have a perfect set of monochrome images. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Damien Lovegrove is a world renowned portrait photographer based in the UK, specializing in making women look fabulous. You can say hello on his website, blog, Twitter and Facebook. This article was also published here and shared with permission. ONE MORE THING Damien was kind enough to share a discount code for his Illumination 1 & 2 video tutorials. (they are awesome!). Use discount code diyphoto on check out for a £25 discount
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Fuji X-Pro 2: First real-world impressions from Bill Palmer

Fuji X-Pro 2: First real-world impressions from Bill Palmer | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
Clockwise from top left: Angel, 35mm f/2; Angel, 56mm f/1.2; Sculpture, 35mm f/2; Like Father Like Son, 35mm f.2; Together Forever, 56mm f/1.2; Over Your Shoulder, 56mm f/1.2 Marriage made in heaven Now, where was I? Back last year when I reviewed the then brand new 35mm f2 I mentioned that it was just made for the still-to-be-announced XPro2. It's so nice to be proven right so emphatically. The two mated with a self-satisfied snick and blended seamlessly into a single photographic device. I pressed the toggle and the blue blade extended with a hum... ...sorry, getting carried away again. In use the X-Pro2 is like the love child of the original X-Pro and the X100T, raised on a diet of blue smarties.  It is smoother, faster, more capable—in fact it is, let's be honest, sexier.  Pretty well every aspect of this camera has been revamped and changed for the better.  Don't be fooled by the exterior similarity, this is not an evolution, it is a full-blooded revolution.  From the snappier AF to the bigger sensor, from the electronic shutter to the extended exposure compensation and the 8fps continuous exposure, every element of the X-Pro1—a formidable camera in it's own right—has been taken apart, thought about, improved, put together, and improved again. I'm still only two days into ownership, but based upon my experiences so far, I have already come to—or more to the point, confirmed—some decisions.  My original X-Pro1 will now be relegated to backup.  My X-T1 is now surplus to requirements and will be sold, most likely to help fund a 100-400 in the not too distant future (and before the airshow and cricket seasons get off the ground).  The X-Pro2 is, in short, the digital camera I have been waiting for ever since I sold my trusty and much-loved Leica M7 .85; it is compact, capable and built like a tank.  In use it flatters, producing images that have a plasticity and luminosity that is simultaneously both signature-Fuji and something new, something more.  I have not had the time to shoot much yet, but what I have done, I really like (you may find otherwise) The X-Pro2 suits my preferences and my personal style, and will be in my bag and in my hand for some considerable time to come.
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Fujifilm X-T1 vs X-Pro2: Which Camera Should You Buy?

Fujifilm X-T1 vs X-Pro2: Which Camera Should You Buy? | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
I personally own the Fujifilm X-T10, but I became curious recently: is the new X-Pro2 worth the upgrade, or is the X-T1 enough of an upgrade from the X-T10? I already did some tests shots on the X-Pro2 for a recent post, and it performed extremely well. But I was still curious on how the two higher-tier cameras compare. So, I borrowed the X-T1 from a friend and did some comparison tests with the X-Pro2, which was lent to me by Fujifilm. I wanted to make the tests as fair as possible so I shot almost all of them inside my studio, as the lighting and conditions don’t change. All shots were taken using same lens, the Fuji 18-55mm f/2.8-4. Side By Side Below is a side by side comparison of the two cameras. For me, the X-Pro2 feels more sturdy, it’s like I’m holding a small version of a full frame pro DSLR. And I think it really is a dust-proof, splash-proof and freeze-proof body, just by the feel of it — it feels like a tank. The menu of the X-Pro2 is also different and more organized. On the quick menu, you can also go to down/up to -4 to +4 on the highlights, shadows, colors, and contrast. You can only go down/up to -2 to +2 on the X-T1. I find this very useful if you want to do all things in-camera. Dual SD slots on the X-Pro2. The X-T1 has the flash sync port on the front, and X-Pro2 on the side. Also different dials on both of the cameras as the X-Pro2 is a rangefinder type camera, and the X-T1 is a DSLR type. If you’re not used to the X-Pro, you need to adjust a bit to the ISO dial but you get used to it after some time. The ISO Dial of the X-T1 is on the left side. There’s an added Focus Level for the X-Pro2 where you can move the joystick in eight directions (which I didn’t use for some reason). The Hybrid Multi Viewfinder with Electronic Rangefinder on the X-Pro2. The tilt screen on the X-T1, which I find very useful. Focusing and Speed The speed of the X-Pro2 is faster than the X-T1, from turning it on to how fast the viewfinder refreshed after clicking the shutter. I tried the focusing speed and accuracy on both of the cameras. The first test was focusing the lens to infinity and using AF-S single point focusing on one part of the watch. The watch was well-lit with a soft box and reflectors placed near the subject. Both camera focused quickly without any problem and almost the same time, with the X-Pro2 about .10 to .20 seconds faster. Shot with the same settings on both of the camera and straight JPG. WB: Kelvin 5600, Classic Chrome, Sharpness +1, Highlights +2. 1/160, ISO 200, f4 I also wanted to try focusing on a back-lit subject, so I placed 3 studio strobes pointing at the white seamless paper, and placed a 300 watts flood light pointing directly at the subject. Both cameras had a hard time focusing when I placed the focus point on the battery’s logo, so I adjusted the focusing point on the rim light on the battery and both cameras got it. Even with the same settings, the X-Pro2 showed more details on the battery. The next test was extremely hard because only a very small amount of light was hitting the subject, the X-Pro2 got the focus almost half of the time and the X-T1 got none. I also tried a quick outdoor test shot. Focusing was AF-C + Zone on both cameras. The X-Pro2 got 4/5 in focus while the X-T1 got 3/5 in focus. Burst Mode High and Outdoor High Speed Photography Test To test the burst mode of both cameras I did a high-speed photography test with milk splashes. Both cameras are 8 FPS on Continuous High. Both settings of the camera were the same. WB: Auto, Velvia, Sharpness +1. 1/4000, ISO 1600, f/4 Color Test To test the colors on both cameras I used the X-Rite ColorChecker. Same settings on both of the camera. WB: Auto, Provia, 1/160, f8, ISO 200 It’s really hard to tell the difference between the two. ISO Test Using only ambient light on the ISO test. I couldn’t find any difference until it went to about ISO 1600, and the X-Pro2 just amazed me when it went to up to 25,600 which is still very usable. Extra ISO settings on the X-Pro2, iso 8,000 and ISO 10,000 RAW Test For the raw test, I shot about 5 stops under exposed on both cameras and brought the exposure back using camera raw. Both cameras did pretty excellent getting those details back. Portrait and Product Test Shot with the same settings on both of the camera and straight JPG. WB: Kelvin 5600, Classic Chrome, Sharpness +1, Highlights +2. 1/160, ISO 200, f4. The colors on the fuji X-Pro2 seems more vibrant. And when zoomed in about 1200px there is more detail in the X-Pro2, maybe because of the higher megapixel count. Settings for both cameras were. WB: Auto, Provia, 1/8, ISO 200, f/5.6 Settings for the Portrait test were WB: Auto, Provia, 1/160, ISO 200, f/8 I got a big mama on the back of the subject (the girlfriend), and a softbox above her. Also placed a reflector below her for fill. The results were the same as the watch, the X-Pro2 having more vibrant colors and more contrast against the X-T1. This is how big the 24.3 Megapixel of the X-Pro2 is compared to the 16.3 Megapixel on the X-T1. Conclusion First of all, the X-Pro2 is the flagship camera of Fujifilm and is also newer than the X-T1. At first when I was only using the LCDs of the cameras, I had a hard time looking at the difference between the image quality of both. After transferring it to my computer and putting the images side by side, however, the X-Pro2 seems more vibrant than the X-T1 straight of the camera. For me, it is also faster and built sturdier than the X-T1. If you are still using the original X-Pro, then no doubt go straight to the X-Pro2. But if you are using a different camera, then it’s quite a tough choice (with rumors of an X-T2 on the horizon, the choice is even harder). If you are the rangefinder type of photographer, need a higher megapixel, or want to shoot at a really high ISO, go for the X-Pro2. But if you’re not, then the X-T1 or even the X-T10 (same sensor as the X-T1) would do the job, and you can use your remaining money for lenses. In the end, both are excellent cameras. I would like to thank Fujifilm Tokyo Headquarters and Fujifilm Philippines, especially Glenn Gatan for assisting me with the X-Pro2. I would also like to thank Doc Ian DV Photography for lending me his X-T1 for this test.
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Vlog 001 - How to become a Fuji X Photographer

PORTFOLIO: http://www.nathanelson.com

INSTAGRAM: @nathanelson

A quick vlog about how I came to be a Fuji X Photographer and the requirements needed for future photographers to join the team. Shot with the Canon G7x.
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Problem with X-Pro2 :: Which X-cameras do you use (POLL) :: Cheap X-T1 or wait for X-T2? :: X-E3 Concept + more Top FXF threads & images

Problem with X-Pro2 :: Which X-cameras do you use (POLL) :: Cheap X-T1 or wait for X-T2? :: X-E3 Concept + more Top FXF threads & images | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
Tibet 2015 shared by Xing TOP FXF THREADS TOC – Episode 19: Fuji X-T2 & Sony A6300 :: Why the X70? :: X-T10 firmware update wishlist :: MF & XF200mmF2 rumors & more – Episode 18: X-Pro2, X100T or X-T1? :: XF100-400 Dilemma :: Absolutely Stunning Selection of Images & more – Episode 17: X-T2 rumors :: X-E3 wishlist :: Lens Advice on Primes :: Move from 56mm to 60mm & more – Episode 16: Are Optical Viewfinders Really Necessary? :: Reuters Banned RAW :: Fuji Vs. Leica lens & more – Episode 15: X-Pro2 launch, keep or sell your X-Pro1 :: XF16mm Feedback? :: Is the Fuji X-T1 really water proof & more – Episode 14: For those of you who don’t trust the X-T1 autofocus :: Another thought on the X-Pro 2 :: Weddings with just primes & more – Epsiode 13: Medium Format Fuji Poll :: Fuji Fun Trumps Everything else :: Why is this Lens a Stupid One? & more – Episode 12: Ken Rockwell blasts the X-T10 : My Favorite Photography Quote : X100R Wanted & more – Epsiode 11: Help me thin my lens collection + X camera wishlist + Portable Solar Charging Solutions + the XF 27mm is Fuji’s best lens & more – Episode 10: Convince me not to dump my X stuff : Great X-T1 off camera flash setup : X-T10, Used X-T1 or Keep X-E2 & more – Episode 9: Is the Panasonic GX8 the X-Pro2 I’ve been waiting for? :: Your least used Fuji features :: GAS Problems & more – Episode 8: Will Fujifilm Be Seduced By the “Dark” side? :: Save me from my GAS! :: My main issue with FW4 & more – Episode 7: HELP ME choose my first FUJI X : Your fantasy Fuji X features : 23 vs 27 for Street Photography & more – Episode 6: 5 Things Fuji is doing Horribly Wrong – Firmware 4.0 Feedback (and bugs?) – Share your Workflow & more – Episode 5: The New Leica Q :: Firmware 4.0 Beta :: Fuji X Wedding Photography Chat :: LR 6.1 & more – Episode 4: POLL: No In Body Image Stabilization, do you bother? :: Old Lenses For Dummies & more – Episode 3: Which 3 primes combo is your ideal setup? :: X-PRO2 wishlist :: Be careful with thumb grips :: Sensor dust & more – Episode 2: CLASH of the FUJIS: X-PRO2 Vs. X-T2 :: X-T1 Vs. X-T10 :: 14mm Vs. 10-24 :: 16mm Vs. 23mm :: 90mm Vs. 56 APD & more – Episode 1: Why do (some) People Hate Fuji? * Mock-Up X-T10 Vs. Real X-T10 (with XF 35mmF2 WR) * X Lens wishlist & more Fuji X Rumors shared by Patrick FR XF33mmF1.0 rumors shared by Patrick FR XF23mm F2 rumors shared by Patrick FR 2.0 Teleconverter Rumor General Discussion – – – POLL – – – shared by FX Admin Which Fuji X cameras do you use? – – – POLL – – – shared by fordfanjpn Poll: How do you use viewfinder, display, menus? shared by Alf Leica Fuji X System X-Pro1 / X-Pro2 shared by vicmay Problem with my X Pro2. shared by bitbonk 24 MP X-Trans III has the same resoution of 36MP Bayer sensor. shared by Kate Rose X-Pro 1 Auto ISO and blue cast challenges…am I being a muppet?! shared by Patrick FR X-Pro2 Review at TheCameraStoreTV (episode filmed on X-Pro2) shared by Yosef Hamidi I have an XT1. Would you recommend an XPRO1? X-T1 / X-T10 shared by petergabriel Buy cheap xt1 or wait for xt2 in June? shared by Mevl so many cameras, how to decide? shared by Woodworth So, what about an X-T2? shared by oldfashioned1536 Tripod for Fuji X-T1 shared by davehutch Hopefully a useful reference guide for some – X-T1 vs. X-E2 Specs shared by Daryl Chan Incorrect color displayed X-E1/X-E2/X-E2S shared by Jano X-E3 Concept – get rid of the build-in flash and make space for a larger EVF… do you agree with this idea? shared by Marcin Petruszka X-E2 or X-Pro1? shared by Jano X-E2 4.0 Applies 16:9 Crop to RAW Files in LR Fuji X Lenses shared by bhamx2 Travelling Combo X-T1 and Two Lenses (But Which Ones??) shared by Mike K Fuji 100-400mm Received Today 1st Impressions shared by xtrans Torn between 27mm f/2.8 and 35mm f/2.0 need your opinions please shared by Raymond Sigarlaki 10-24mm F4 OR 16mm F1.4? Adapting lenses to Fuji X shared by tezza Old fujinon lenses X100(S+T)/X70 shared by delmundo Will you buy a X100 (X200) with a 28mm equiv. lens? shared by Michael Russell Fuji X100T or wait for X200 ? shared by Andrej Jesenovec Request: X100S/T Crop mode framelines (42,50,65)   RAW PROCESSING shared by Jackalized Lightroom/ACR – free ClassicChrome profile (.dcp) for X-Pro1 & X-E1! shared by Joy Newbould Raw conversion topic VERY confusing! – can anyone clarify IMAGES shared by Alf Cuba shared by Paul Crespel KIDS & TEENAGERS shared by Burb Cityscapes with Fujifilm X _ _ _ landscapes with fuji x shared by MrThePlague Push the READ MORE Button to see more Top Liked Images _ _ _ landscapes with fuji x shared by papedo _ _ _ All around the world shared by lightpainter _ _ _ Tibet 2015 shared by Xing _ _ _ Favorite X-shot 2015: Share Yours! shared by Patrick FR _ _ _ Tibet 2015 shared by Xing _ _ _ All around the world shared by Don Pino _ _ _ The animal far side gallery (Open Thread) shared by Sluw _ _ _ Bokeh Club shared by KwyjiboVanDeKamp _ _ _ Seascape shared by lichtundlaerm _ _ _ landscapes with fuji x shared by lichtundlaerm _ _ _ Seascape shared by joergs _ _ _ Fuji Flowers shared by liveimpressionphoto _ _ _ Streetphotography (open thread) shared by Watcher24 _ _ _ Do we have any X-users using their X cameras for sports? shared by vicmay _ _ _ landscapes with fuji x shared by Don Pino _ _ _ landscapes with fuji x shared by SirMax _ _ _ 1st Engagement shoot with X-T1 shared by mart46 _ _ _ black and white (open thread) shared by SpaceLab Yellow
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Fuji X-Pro2 Review Part Two: Low light autofocus and high ISO performance

Fuji X-Pro2 Review Part Two:  Low light autofocus and high ISO performance | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
(Fuji X-Pro2, 90mm, Acros film simulation, f/2.2 at 1/200th at ISO 2500) Note:  This is part two of a five part review series on the soon to be released Fuji X-Pro2: Part One:  Unboxing and First Impressions Part Two:  Low light autofocus and high ISO Part Three:  Portrait sessions, image quality, and working with lighting Part Four:  Street photography (of course!) Part Five:  Final thoughts The day after I received my review copy of the Fuji X-Pro2 I was off to photograph one of Vancouver’s best local bands at a country cabaret.  The combination of low light, changing light, and moving subjects always presents a great challenge to photographers, and I knew this would be a perfect opportunity to test the  autofocus and high ISO performance of this new camera. It should be noted that Fuji has made significant strides in their autofocus system over the last few years.  For comparison purposes, here is a really bad photo of the 49 contrast detection autofocus points in the original X-Pro1, released 4 years ago: Now, here is a quick iPhone shot of the autofocus points on the new Fuji X-Pro2: 273 autofocus points in total, with 77 being phase detect.  A huge improvement.  I hesitate to type this because it sounds too Pollyanna, but while I was shooting this gig I did not miss focus once due to the autofocus system… despite the low light of the cabaret.   I was impressed with this, as I had not been so successful with previous cameras. In regard to the ISO performance… Fuji cameras have been known for their high ISO performance.  When the new 24.3mp X-Trans CMOS III sensor was announced there were some discussions about the increased megapixel count, and whether it would negatively impact the high ISO performance.   This is subjective of course, but I find the image quality very good, even at ISO 6400. Enough talk, let’s look at some images.  When I am shooting in a venue like this I will often bring a flash with me, but I purposely didn’t for this gig to test the new X-Pro2.  I decided to shoot in Aperture Priority Mode, and used Auto ISO with a minimum shutter speed of 1/200th and an ISO ceiling of 6400.   The images were saved as compressed RAW, and were written to both card slots at the same time.  I brought 4 lenses with me:  The 16mm, the 35mm f/1.4, the 56mm, and the 90mm. Let’s start by taking another look at the image from the top of this post: (Fuji X-Pro2, 90mm, Acros film simulation, f/2.2 at 1/200th at ISO 2500) That is the new Acros film simulation.  I love it.  To my eyes ISO 2500 looks very clean too. Here are some more, with most shot at ISO 6400: (Fuji X-Pro2, 35mm, f/2.8 at 1/200th at ISO 6400) (Fuji X-Pro2, 16mm, f/2.2 at 1/200th at ISO 5000) (Fuji X-Pro2, 16mm, Acros film simulation, f/2 at 1/140th at ISO 6400) (Fuji X-Pro2, 16mm, f/2.8 at 1/80th at ISO 6400) (Fuji X-Pro2, 16mm, f/2.5 at 1/40th at ISO 6400) (Fuji X-Pro2, 16mm, Acros film simulation, f/2 at 1/200th at ISO 1250) (Fuji X-Pro2, 56mm, f/2 at 1/110th at ISO 6400) (Fuji X-Pro2, 35mm, Acros film simulation, f/2.8 at 1/40th at ISO 6400) I am very pleased with these images, and with the performance of the X-Pro2 in a difficult lighting situation.  I’ve known some of the members of this band for a long time, so I had carte blanche to shoot from anywhere:  The dance floor, behind the stage, above the stage, on the stage, etc.   The camera performed beautifully throughout the night, and I was free to focus on creating images without worrying about the technical side of photography.  It felt great. For part three of this review series we’ll be changing gears and looking at the performance of the X-Pro2 in a studio lighting situation.   Until then! Cheers, Ian
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From Nikon to Fuji (from gear collector to photographer)

From Nikon to Fuji (from gear collector to photographer) | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
When I was 21, I bought myself a Nikon D5100, with 18-55mm kit lens and fulfilled my childish dream of having a “proper” camera for capturing what I see. As the time progressed I sold the kit lens and slowly added Nikon 35 mm F1.8, Samyang 8mm F3.5, Nikon 55-200mm F3.5-F4.0, and later on swapped the old manual Samyang 8mm for Tokina 11-16mm F2.8. Last year I went to travel for the first in my life to Middle-East and Asia. Back then, my whole gear would have been somewhere around 4,5 kg. D5100, 3 lenses, cleaning kit, flash, tripod, charger and spare batteries, cards, remote control, etc. I realised already before leaving for the travel that 3 months with this added weight on my backpack might prove to be a horrible idea. And it did. The performance of D5100 was just fine for me at that time, and possibilities to go all the way from 11mm to 200mm seemed to be just perfect for anything. But by the time I crossed Turkey and Iran and arrived to UAE I was already more than sick of carrying my equipment around and decided to overspend my travel budget and bought X100s in Dubai. My next destination was Kathmandu and after 3 days with X100s I sold my D5100 with 35mm and 55-200mm lens on a market in Kathmandu, for some 300 USD after hard bargain. Maybe I got ripped off, but I didn’t want the camera anyway as I got an ultimate all-rounder in my hands. The only things I saved from my original gear was tripod and Tokina 11-16mm lens that I sold once I got back to Europe. So what are the advantages of this small camera that really matter to me ? 1, Size X100s fits even in side pocket of my trousers, if I need to put it there. The size of the camera didn’t bother me before, but once I got used to it, I cannot imagine going back to even a “small” crop-sensor DSLR. It is light and I notice it in my backpack or around my neck just enough to know it’s still there, and not to feel it’s weight after couple of days hike in mountains. 2, Design Fuji’s design is stylish, no matter what age-group you belong to. There are heaps of articles promoting Fuji’s design. It is an attractive camera. What matters for me is that it looks old, and perhaps useless, even though the absolute opposite is the truth. It doesn’t scare away people on the streets, nor farmers or monks or anybody else for that matter. It is a small harmless camera. When I was trying to shoot a “Celebration” of death of a prophet Muhammed in Tehran with D5100 and 11-16mm Tokina lens, after 3 minutes I was approached by local police, later by national security agents and soldiers asking for my “press-pass card” from Iranian government and it took me more than 40 minutes to explain, that I am simply travelling through their country and I am definitely not working for any foreign press. By the time I was finished, also everything interesting finished and I walked away “empty-carded” from something really astonishing with my “professional looking DSLR”. With X100s I was shooting monks praying and they had no idea I ever took out a camera to shoot them, and I never got into any similar problem. Another plus is that most people in Asia and Europe, in the countries I’ve visited so far, think I have some kind of old film camera. Average people think this camera has no value. As a result nobody is interested in stealing some old junk. 3, Quality The materials that the camera is made of, and overall finish is incomparable with the Nikon I had before. All-metal solid piece of resistant perfection. Recently, when hiking through humid jungle in west Java, I slipped on a trek and jumped into mud hole with my x100s around my neck without any cover. Mud splashed all around my body and face, and the camera display side was completely covered in a proper layer of mud. For a moment I thought that this was it for my Fuji. I found a waterfall 5 minutes later. With a piece of cloth I took away most of the mud and then dried it with a small towel I had in a backpack. Turned it back on and continued my trip. I stayed with this camera in Norwegian mountains and took it for trips in -30°C for lunch-time sunrises and ended up in snow more than once. Last year I spend 7 months in India, 6 of which I was living and working as a teacher in Varanasi. In those 6 months Varanasi turned from sand-storm area with 46°C (day or night) to a monsoon jungle with humidity around 90% and 38-30°C. I never had a problem with this small, smart, resistant system. 4, Photos The resulting quality of the pictures is simply amazing. The photos can get a bit soft, If you push it all the way to F2.0 but that’s the fact I can very easily live with. I shot into .RAF (Fuji’s RAW) and avoid jpg at all, to save some space on my cards. I only stumbled a bit with Fuji when it comes to post-processing. Results I got in Lightroom didn’t satisfy me and compared to in-camera jpg were much more softer and the colours were way off. I switched to “Capture One” software and found myself being happy photographer once again. X100s performance in the evening or night is outstanding. I can afford to push it to ISO 3200 and still get decent noise and good quality prints out of it. 5, Creativity Being used to gear that can take you from 8mm to 200mm, that gives you freedom to always zoom in/out on any subject, I do get challenged with only 35mm. If you get stuck with 35mm you simply have to get creative. You can forget about zooming in on a wild rhino 150 meters away, or taking a picture inside a cave. But when it comes to daily use on the street or in the nature, this camera will force you to work with what you have. It will either push you towards being creative and finding a way to build up a scene or you will fail. Both of the results are good in my opinion, either you do something with the scene that you made yourself and can be proud of, or you simply don’t produce a photo that had nothing personal in it. You have to get closer, to get a proper portrait, you have to get to the action to capture it and the photos become more personal. Looking at this transition a bit over year after, I am more than satisfied that I made up my mind and got one X100s for myself. I learned to get closer to my subject and not just shot them from far with tele-photo lens. I got far more creative with angles/shapes/subjects in my photos. I can make a handheld high-quality shots in the evening. I don’t have to think about other lenses and where to get money for them. I simply have a camera that I can use in almost any condition (freezing winter/humid jungle/desert/day or night). It doesn’t weight almost anything, it looks great, it’s practical, fast and simple and allows me to set anything by myself, if I want to. It is simply the best choice I could have made, that helped me to become better photographer.
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Fujifilm XPRO2 Review – The Reality | Sven Schroeter

Fujifilm XPRO2 Review – The Reality | Sven Schroeter | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
The Fujifilm XPro2 has big shoes to fill. We started our journey partnered with Fujifilm behind the wheel of the XPro1 and have some very strong feelings associated with its unique character. When you commit to the Fujifilm XPro series you get more than just a camera, you get a partner and form a bond. It was a privilege to have had a sample copy so early. There is always a lot of self imposed pressure when handling a camera with this much hype surrounding its release. Your aim is not only to create something unique, but to also push the boundaries and test the limits of the camera. For this particular review we wanted to include a touch of New Zealand’s great outdoors and create portraits of those who pursue a unique form of self expression. The primary reason we got into bed with Fujifilm was to get away from lugging big kit on our backs when wandering off the beaten track. We never intended to make a complete switch to the Fujifilm X series camera system for all our work, but we had so much fun with the original XPro1 that the decision came easy in the end…….. Source: www.bokeh-monster.com 0 FLARES Twitter 0Facebook 0Google+ 0Pin It Share 0Filament.io Made with Flare More Info'> Related Posts: Fujiflim X-Pro2 Review | Fuji vs. Fuji Fujifilm X-Pro 2 hands-on review | Digital Camera World X-Pro2. STYLE with SUBSTANCE | Ivan Joshua Loh Fujifilm X-Pro2 : Review | Michael R. Cruz Climbing Slieve Donard with the Fujifilm X-Pro2 | David Cleland
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From Fuji to Sony and back again By Wijnand Schouten

From Fuji to Sony and back again  By Wijnand Schouten | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
From Fuji to Sony and back again By Wijnand Schouten Hello Brandon and Steve. I have had the pleasure to be on your site a couple of times with my Fuji x100 and x100s. 2 Months ago I decided to jump over and buy the Sony Rx1rII. To make this possible I had to sell my camera’s and so I did. The specifications were great and I could not wait. Something I had to do because the delivery was postponed with 3 weeks in Holland. When it finally arrived I started making pictures. Almost right away I felt insecure about my skills.Not that I am a professional but I have experience. I could not get a sharp image out of the camera.Not as sharp as I was used to with the Fuji’s . After one month I returned the camera to Sony because I was sure the camera had a failure. 5 Weeks later the returned it and said it was completely ok and I could get pictures of the testing. I  was not interested.I wanted a camera that I was happy with for the 3500 euro. To make a story short.. I went to a store..returned the camera and exchanged it for the Fuji Xpro2. Financially a bad trade but happiness is all I have now.Beautifull images and the sharpness I really love. Almost no need for raw shooting because the jpegs are so nice. Also the acros and monochrome settings are nice. I promised to my Fuji camera I will never try to fall in love with a different brand again ;) Here are some images of the xpro 2
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Michael Gane's curator insight, April 4, 5:15 AM

I nearly did the same and went for the Sony camera, great article.

http://www.thefxworks.co.uk/personal-gallery

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Fujifilm X-Pro2: Digital Photography Review

Fujifilm X-Pro2: Digital Photography Review | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
Discuss in the Fujifilm X System / SLR Talk forum Manufacturer description: The Fujifilm X-Pro2 is the long-awaited update to the X-Pro1 and offers a new 24.3MP APS-C X-Trans CMOS III sensor and an 'advanced hybrid multi viewfinder' that can be an optical or electronic viewfinder, or a combination of the two. Its new image processor is 4x faster than that of its predecessor and offers a top ISO of 51,200. The autofocus system has been updated substantially, now offering 273 total AF points, of which 77 are phase detection (covering 40% of the frame), and much faster performance. The X-Pro2's body is made from four pieces of magnesium alloy with 61 seals, making it splash and dust proof, and functional down to temperatures of +14F. It has dedicated dials for exposure compensation, shutter speed and ISO. It has a maximum shutter speed of 1/8000 sec and an x-sync speed of 1/250 sec. Other features of note include a 3", 1.62M-dot LCD, twin SD card slots, interval shooting and a new ACROS film simulation mode. The X-Pro2 can record 1080/60p video at 36MBps and offers a 2.5mm mic input jack. As one would expect, the camera also supports Wi-Fi with remote camera control.
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Fujifilm X-Pro2 Review | What Digital Camera

Fujifilm X-Pro2 Review | What Digital Camera | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
When Fujifilm announced the original X100 back in 2010, there was a real buzz around what might be next to follow in the X-series. Speculation on the production of a rangefinder-meets-Compact-System-Camera finally came to fruition in early 2012 and the X-Pro1 set the benchmark in the X-series for being the first interchangeable lens camera to flaunt the X-mount and accept a brand new range of XF-series lenses. The combination of the X-Pro1’s retro styling, X-Trans sensor technology and hybrid multi viewfinder caught the attention of many serious enthusiasts and seasoned pros who warmed to the idea of owning a modern digital rangefinder-style model capable of delivering exceptional image quality and withstanding the demands of day-to-day use. Needless to say, the X-Pro1 was a revolutionary camera that will always be remembered for kick-starting Fujifilm’s X-series system as we know it. Though still widely used, the X-Pro1 has started to lag behind today’s competition. To compete with the best in the market, Fujifilm needed to create an out-and-out replacement, and this has recently arrived in the guise of the X-Pro2…….. Source: www.whatdigitalcamera.com 0 FLARES Twitter 0Facebook 0Google+ 0Pin It Share 0Filament.io Made with Flare More Info'> Related Posts: First Impressions: The Fujifilm X-Pro2 | David Cleland Fujifilm X-Pro2 impressions and reviews curation | Thomas Menk The new, incredible X-Pro2 | Max de Martino The X-Pro2… Finally! | Neill Soden Fujifilm X-Pro2 Review | White Cube Studios
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Abraham lake with Fuji and film - Alberta Landscape

Abraham lake with Fuji and film - Alberta Landscape | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
After seeing amazing photos of Abraham lake in winter, we wanted to see it for ourselves.  These photographs are pretty common, as the area is beautiful, and Abraham lake, being man made, exhibits methane bubbles which get trapped in ice.  These, and sunrise in the Rocky mountains is a recipe for beautiful images.  This lake may be photographed by many, but not us.  So having one eye on the weather, we got up quietly at 3am and started our 4h drive, to see if we can get lucky.  When I say lucky I mean lucky.  2 years ago, we attempted the same, and arrived at the snow covered lake and -35C.  So one could say it was a bust.  This year we got partly lucky.  The ice was clear, the trapped methane bubbles were there, but the sunrise wasn't.  Landscape photography is like a baking contest.  You have a time limit, and unpredictable ingredients.  Your cake will either be yummy, or it will fail miserably.  The best of the landscape photographers, can bend the ingredients to their will, and still create something wonderful, even when given salt, when sugar is needed.  Kasia and me, try to create compelling images, even when the ingredients are not in our favour.  Since Kasia started using Fuji cameras, instead of Sony, I decided to challenge myself, by taking an old medium format film camera with 2 lenses, one digital Fuji and only 1 lens.  I guess one could say, trying to stay true to MiKSMedia roots of film and digital.  There were odd times when I felt a pang of jealousy, watching Kasia with the super wide Fuji 10-24.  I just have to be less selfish and know that this outing is a team effort.  I know if she had the Sony cameras, we would end up with same images.  Sharing Fuji gear, actually makes us closer. Since we were in Alberta Rockies, we could not just stop at the bubbles, so we spend a day driving through, but that's for another post.
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Fuji X-Pro2 Review Part Three: Vancouver Cityscapes, Long Exposures, and Street Photography

Fuji X-Pro2 Review Part Three:  Vancouver Cityscapes, Long Exposures, and Street Photography | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
Note:  This is part three of a five part review series on the soon to be released Fuji X-Pro2: Part One:  Unboxing and first impressions Part Two:  Low light autofocus and high ISO Part Three:  Cityscapes, long exposures and street photography Part Four: Portraiture  Part Five:  Final thoughts My original plan for part three of this Fuji X-Pro2 review series was to focus 100% on street photography.   Things changed for me a little though because of the weather on the days I went out to shoot.  The clouds were beautiful, the blue hour light was gorgeous, etc.   These conditions just begged to be shot, so I have included some of those photographs in this part of the review too.  Let’s just think of it as a “using the Fuji X-Pro2 in the city” kind of review. LONG EXPOSURES: Those amazing clouds I mentioned have unfortunately brought us a lot of rain lately (welcome to life on the “wet” coast).   It was dry and sunny yesterday though, with a fairly strong breeze that was pushing the clouds across the city.    The combination of sunlight reflecting off of high rises and moving clouds  always makes for some great architectural long exposure opportunities. The following three photos were all shot with the Fujinon 10-24mm f/4 lens mounted on the Fuji X-Pro2.  The camera was on a tripod, a 10 stop ND filter was used to lengthen the shutter speed a bit to blur the clouds, and a remote shutter release was used to avoid vibration.  Each image was shot in the Acros film simulation, with the contrast pushed in camera. I experienced a lot of good, and a tiny little bit of frustration, when taking these photos… The good was the exposure preview.  I LOVE being able to preview my exposure, white balance, film simulation, etc in camera, BEFORE I click the shutter.  It never gets old.  Switching to cameras that preview the exposure made a fundamental shift in my workflow, and greatly enhances the creative process for me. And Acros.  I love, love Acros.  Such a great black and white film simulation.  I did edit these photos in Lightroom a bit though, to push the blacks and highlights a little bit more. The one small point of frustration was the lack of a tilting LCD.  I have to admit I rarely use this feature on my X-T1, and I get by just fine without it on my X100t.  For these photos I had the camera pointed up and fairly low to the ground though, and an adjustable LCD would have made things easier in terms of focusing, etc. STREET PHOTOGRAPHY: My love of the X100 series is well documented, and I was curious to see how the X-Pro2 performed during a day or two out shooting on the street.  I love the X100t for street photography because it is completely silent, it is small, and it is unassuming.  I wondered if shooting street with the X-Pro2 and the Fujinon 35mm f/1.4 lens would be different due to the size and the shutter sound, but once I was out shooting it was all good. As I shot in Vancouver’s Chinatown and Gastown areas I again noticed the improvements in the autofocus system of the X-Pro2.  It is snappy and accurate.  I often zone focus my X100t when I am out shooting street, but every photo below was taken with autofocus. At this point I feel quite comfortable saying that the autofocus system in the X-Pro2 is a definite step up from previous Fuji X cameras. All the images below were shot in aperture priority mode (around f/8 depending on light), with the Auto ISO set to maintain a minimum shutter speed of 1/250th and a ceiling ISO of 3200.  If I needed to make any quick exposure adjustments I almost always used the exposure compensation dial. Colour images were shot in Classic Chrome, black and white ones were shot in Acros. I honestly don’t have a lot to say about shooting street with the Fuji X-Pro2.  It was seamless, and despite my earlier concerns people took no more notice of me with it than they do when I am shooting with my X100t.   The camera got out of my way and I was able to focus completely on the shooting experience. I really appreciated the improved autofocus, and having a little bit more room for cropping because of the new 24mp sensor was also a welcome addition. BLUE HOUR CITYSCAPES: I love a good cityscape, and each evening I was downtown there was a beautiful blue hour.   Here is one of Granville Street in Vancouver: Here is another, taken in Gastown: These are fairly straight forward photographs to take, regardless of the camera used.  Lock the camera down on a tripod, get your composition, lowest ISO, set your desired aperture, use a remote shutter release, etc.  What I loved about shooting these images with the X-Pro2 wasn’t that the process was any different, it was the colour and detail that I was getting off of the new sensor straight out of camera.  It is very nice. PART 3 – FINAL THOUGHTS: In many ways I feel like part 3 of this series is much ado about nothing, but I mean that in the best way possible.  The X-Pro2 is refined…. the new sensor produces beautiful images, the new autofocus system is snappy and responsive, and I love the new Acros film simulation. Looking back over this post perhaps the most telling thing is how easy these images were to capture.  I had the Fuji X-Pro2 in a small shoulder bag with 2-3 lenses and a few small accessories.  I walked about 10 kilometres in the city on the days I was out shooting and didn’t even notice the weight of the bag, nor the small travel tripod I was carrying.  I was able to shoot street, cityscapes, long exposures, handheld, tripod mounted, all from this tiny but powerful little kit. You have to love that. I did find one situation where a tilting LCD would have been nice.  For those that are curious I burned through 2 batteries during each full day of heavy shooting.  Not too shabby. In Part 4 of this series we will be talking about using the X-Pro2 in portrait situations, and in part 5 I’ll sum up my final thoughts. Cheers, Ian
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X-Gene: A Love and Hate Story | Fujifilm X-PRO1 & X-T1

X-Gene: A Love and Hate Story | Fujifilm X-PRO1 & X-T1 | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
I am happily married to my Nikon gear. But there’s always room for lovers. Right?   So before I tried out the Sony stuff, I’ve also found myself buying a X-Pro1 from Fuji. For about 4 months I used the Fuji for everyday snaps and of course occasional usage in portrait sessions; however, I have to say my experiences were… Let’s just say I was puzzled, and I’ll elaborate on that later. I ended up selling the X-Pro1 in mid-2015. When I eventually sold the A7 II, I decided to give Fujifilm another chance. This time with their flagship X-T1. Two months into my purchase, all I have to say is: WOW. I would like to share my thoughts on both the X-Pro1 and X-T1 with you. But first, let’s take a look at the size comparison of the X-T1 with my D800. I understand it might not be fair to judge a 24-70mm f/2.8 lens on a DSLR with a crop-mirroless paired with a kit-prime, but hey, I dare you to try putting a 50-equiv. on the Nikon body and see for yourself. It’s pointless to compare, guys. Let’s just get over it.   Image Quality & Dynamic Range: There isn’t a significant difference between in the IQ department between my X-T1 and the X-Pro1. Now, I do realize they use different sensors (yet both owning a X-Trans 16mp identity) and processors, with the X-T1 clearly being more advanced and matured. But both share perfectly acceptable high-iso capabilities and killer JPEG engines. What’s more on the X-T1, safe to say, is just better at high-iso, but only just a smidge. I am NOT a JPEG guy when I can shoot in RAW. Typically because I do like to take time in post to adjust my pictures to my liking. With that being said, Fujifilm does offer a killer JPEG engine in these X-series cameras. Apart from the well-documented film simulations (my favorite being Classic Chrome), the ability to play with Highlight Tone and Shadow Tone provides a good range of tools for JPEG lovers to play-around in the camera. Dynamic Range in the RAW files is fine, not great. There are some good chunks of detail one can recover from the shadows, but the highlights will be blown-out for good. In my experiences, Fuji cameras also tend to expose about 1/3 stop brighter than Sony cameras in auto-exposure settings, so it will be better to shoot in full-manual if dead-on exposure is necessary. I found Auto White Balance way more “accurate” and consistent than older Nikon bodies and Sony’s mirrorless cameras. In comparison though, Fuji’s AWB generally detects cooler temperatures. Colors are great, with greens healthily rich but not overwhelming to the shadow tones like in the older Nikon bodies. Blues are also clean and wonderful to look at in-camera. Finally, skins tones. Game over, Nikon. Game over.   Ease of Use X-T1 excels beyond the X-Pro1 mainly in the technical department. Little should be said of how the X-T1 has much less quirkiness in comparison to the X-Pro1, for the X-Pro1 was the first interchangeable lens X-series camera from Fuji. After since Firmware 4.00, or “Kaizen”, even the slowest-focusing XF35mm F1.4 R became quite usable in good light on the X-T1. What Fuji really had me sold better than the Sony are the ability to select focus points directly from the D-Pad, and the capability to link metering to focus points (On the X-T1, that is). Even better, Fujifilm lets you choose between either to use these features or turn them off. So why can’t Sony do this? Urgh. The X-series of cameras in general, in my humble opinion, is more complete, in software, than the Sony. You can see your focus areas when selecting focus points on the Fuji, the Sony can’t. You can choose either to set the D-Pad as function keys or focus-choosing nobs, the Sony can’t. On the X-T1 you can even see information flip according to orientation in the EVF when in portrait/landscape orientation, again, the Sony can’t. Honestly, I found Fuji X, especially the X-T1, easier to use than the Sony A7, the A7R, and the A7 II, all of which I have had extensive experiences with. With the above being said, I do have some gripes with the Fuji. First off, some lenses just don’t balance well with the X-Pro1. It suffers mainly from a bad grip-design, and buying an accessory grip will only help so much before one gets irritated and just decide not to use it anymore. Sometimes I do use the Wifi capability in the X-T1 to send pictures to my iPhone and edit them with VSCOcam or Instagram, yet I found Fujifilm’s Wifi transfer unfriendly to RAW shooters. In Sony cameras, even if one shoot pictures in RAW, the Wifi app will decode these picutres into JPEGs when transferring to an iPhone. The Fuji doesn’t, so that means one would have to take an extra step of using the in-camera processor to decode RAW files one-by-one before transferring them to an iPhone. This is a pain. Processed with VSCOcam with lv01 preset The Fujinon Lenses: Ok, I’ll try not to piss-off fellow X-shooters here, but I’m not entirely satisfied with these highly acclaimed Fuji glass. I’m not a believer of DxO scores (quite frankly Fujinon XF lenses aren’t even tested by DxO for some reason), and most of my thoughts come only from experiences shooting them. I’ve bought the XF18mm, XF35mm F1.4, XF23mm, XF56mm, and the XF18-55mm kit zoom. Honestly, I don’t think most of them are as technically-complete as their competitors. Let me explain. I don’t know if I got a bad copy or what, the XF35mm F1.4 at wide-open just isn’t as sharp as my trusty Sigma 50mm F1.4 [ART] and Sony FE 55mm F1.8 ZA. Additionally, there are some severe spherical aberration when shot at close distances. I do appreciate this lens’s close-focusing capability, though. The XF23mm F1.4 is also perplexing to me. The close-focusing capability is only average among 35-equiv. lenses on the market, and it suffers from a low maximum reproduction ratio at only 0.1x. Sharpness is alright, but it doesn’t balance very well on the X-Pro1, so I tend to use it less than other lenses. XF18mm F2 is soft as warm jello wide-open. Corners only get to an acceptable level of sharpness once pushed to F8, and that’s about as sharp as it can go. I do recommend the XF56mm F1.2 Although, again, it doesn’t balance well with the X-Pro1, it is a gem of a lens with good sharpness wide-open and good close-focusing capability. With an aperture as bright as F1.2, shooters can get really creative with it. Also, I prefer the non-APD’s bokeh rendition over the APD version’s. These Fujinon lenses, with Fujifilm’s Super EBC coating, can get some weird-looking multi-bladed flare wide-open. One will only have to shoot it against strong light to understand it. Moreover, Contrast won’t be great, in comparison to Nikon’s lenses with Nano Crystal Coating, when shooting back-lit subjects. I don’t know if this is why Fujifilm recently developed and implemented the Nano-GI coating on some of their premium lenses. I hope their coating technology improves. New Fujinon XF lenses do look very promising. I am intrigued by the XF90mm F2’s close focusing capability and XF50-140mm F2.8’s versatility. I can’t wait to try them out.     My Verdict: Obviously there is still room for improvement on these X-series cameras. Even with firmware 4.00, X-T1’s AF performance can only get as fast as the limiting PDAF area and lens motors allow it to. Lenses such as the XF18mm and XF35mm F1.4 just don’t get lightning fast even with the advent of firmware 4.00. If I read it right in Fujifilm’s interview with Digital Camera Watch (jp), they have improved their lens motors and have been implementing them into the XF90mm and the XF50-140mm. I’ve tried out the new XF35mm F2 lens in camera stores, but I still find it not as fast as lenses with Fuji’s new linear motors. Let’s hope they’ll eventually get better. When it comes to AF, even in single-point, I still think Sony has the upper-hand in technology now. The new A7R II is a beast in offering a wide variety of focusing options. But of course, that is a newer camera than the X-T1. I enjoyed shooting the Fujifilm cameras. Colors are nice, controls are nice, EVF in the X-T1 is really nice, and I am confident to use it as my backup-cam for my DSLR. Maybe it’s when I buy the newly announced X-Pro2 will I become a fully X-shooter. I give Fuji X a two-thumbs up, and I’ll see you guys in my next review, which will probably be the X100T I’ve been using for a while now. Cheers.
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The Fuji X-Pro 2 – First Impressions

The Fuji X-Pro 2 – First Impressions | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
It was a long time coming but Fuji is finally shipping the successor to the X-Pro1 – the Fuji X-Pro2 is a stunning update that most Fuji shooters are at least interested in. There was a lot of hype about this camera from the Fuji ambassadors so I wanted to give the camera a once-over in order to see for myself what all the fuss was about. Let me start by saying this is NOT a review. I haven’t had nearly enough time with the camera to fully test it. But my first blush reaction concurs with much of what you read. Fuji certainly got a lot right with this new version. It’s very solid, feels good in the hand and is very responsive. The responsive part is a big deal. The first Fuji X-camera I ever tested was the original X-Pro 1 and it was sluggish. That is not a problem with the new camera. I had already been studying the manual (which Fuji posted on their website) so I was somewhat familiar with the camera. I quickly set it for HIGH PERFORMANCE mode (which chews through batteries the way my old dog would attack a steak) and I set up Film Simulation Bracketing since I was excited to see the Fuji Acros (B&W) simulation compared with color looks. I dialed in three of my all-time favorite films – Velvia, Classic Chrome and Acros. I was immediately impressed with the straight out of the camera JPEGs. They continue to be the best in the business. Overall handling is very good. Moving all the main buttons to the right side of the camera body was a great idea and I particularly like the placement of the Q-Button. It makes it much easier to find. And then there’s the little joystick. Don’t underestimate this little addition to the camera. Wow I love that thing. It makes setting the autofocus point a breeze. Let’s answer one big question. Is the AF fast? The new autofocus is very fast. Not Canon 1DX fast. Not Nikon D4s fast. But it’s plenty fast for most situations. There are more AF points in the new camera and even the contrast-based autofocus points are improved IF you are using one of these Fuji XF lenses – the XF16-55mm, XF50-140mm, XF90mm, XF35mmF2, or the XF100-400mm. These newer lenses contain electronic components that allow them to interact better with the contrast AF. All other lenses will autofocus at the same speed as the X-T1 when relying on contrast-based AF points but will still be faster when using the new expanded phase detect AF points. Now on to the second most often asked question, which is “What is the high ISO performance like?” The high ISO performance at ISO 3200 is simply amazing. ISO 6400 is actually useable – really! I do believe the X-Pro2 is a full stop better than the X-T1 and I was already impressed with the X-T1. I admit I was worried that the higher resolution (24.3MP) would overload the new APS-C X-Trans CMOS III Sensor. Turns out there was nothing to worry about. Fuji managed to cram more pixels onto an APS-C sized sensor and yet get even better high ISO performance. My hat is off to them. (They must use magic!) I will note that there is the appearance of “grain” NOT noise in some images depending on ISO, etc. and I do chalk this up to the higher megapixel sensor but I don’t find it remotely disturbing. The one thing that I was underwhelmed by was the hybrid optical viewfinder. I know, I know – I am very much alone here but I found it distracting most of the time and switched to purely EVF. I loved the WYSIWYG results from the EVF and Fuji makes the best EVF around, but I can see that the hybrid viewfinder as coming in handy when shooting high-speed continuous frame rates. Why? The frame blacks out on the EVF in high-speed continuous shooting but not the hybrid viewfinder. This is a very subjective thing and I wouldn’t make much of it. It’s just not my cup of tea but who knows, maybe it will grow on me. MISC STUFF The Fuji X-T1 (X-T10) batteries work in the X-Pro 2 so that is a good thing since I have several of them in my bag. The double card slot looks a little tight but it works. The viewfinder is sharper and faster. The video is noticeably improved but those of you who are focused on video should probably go with something like the Panasonic GH4 because that camera will give you 4K and the Fuji will not. CONCLUSION The Fuji X-Pro 2 is a unique camera. If you like the rangefinder styling and you want the super sharp, high-quality lenses that Fuji is making for the X-Series, want great high-ISO performance, etc., you may not balk at the $1699 price. (NOTE some stores are selling the camera for more than $1699 due to limited availability – prices should stabilize in a few weeks.) It’s a premium product and Fuji is pricing it that way. I assume that in a year or so, the price will fall to a more reasonable level, but for now, you have to pay the early adopter tax. Judging things by my initial experience with the camera I would say it’s worth it. That may change after I dig in a little deeper (but I doubt it.) If you shoot with an X-T1, you will find the form factor on the X-Pro2 a bit different and it may take getting used to. But the new camera is faster, higher-resolution, offers better video and performs even better at high ISO than the X-T1. If you’re not in a hurry, I assume you will see the same performance out of the X-T2, due to be announced later this year. The image quality remains stupendous. The JPEGs SOOC are top-notch. The autofocus is fast. If the camera continues to deliver like it has in my initial tests, I am sure I will offer my highest recommendation. ________ This Post Sponsored by: Perfectly Clear for Photoshop or Lightroom is all about saving you time so you can focus on doing what you love best. Get a free trial of the award winning plug-in here. The HDR Learning Center. Check out new ways to use High Dynamic Range photography to make compelling images. Free tutorials and posts to get results. Produced in partnership with HDRsoft Lighting Survey. Take the chance to win an iPhone 6s or 6s Plus. Respond to a 5 minute survey regarding lighting equipment for photographers — http://bit.ly/lightingsurvey2 lynda.com Learn photography anytime, anywhere, and at your own pace—from bite-sized tutorials to comprehensive courses. Try lynda.com free for 10 days by visiting lynda.com/Photofocus
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Classic Chrome on Fujifilm X-Pro1 and X-E1 | Stephen Bray

Classic Chrome on Fujifilm X-Pro1 and X-E1 | Stephen Bray | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
PEOPLE FREQUENTLY ASK WHY FUJIFILM NEVER OFFERED CLASSIC CHROME AS A RENDERING OPTION FOR THEIR X-PRO1 AND X-E1 CAMERAS. I confess that I’ve googled to see if this update is available on a few occasions. It isn’t, or at least the availability is not obvious. In fact, both the X-Pro1 and X-E1 are boxed with a custom version of SilkyPix a RAW converter that is specially adapted for the Fujifilm X-Trans sensor. Classic Kodachrome was included within the rendering options available from the end of February 2015. This is often overlooked, however, because the .jpg files from all the X-Series cameras are so good many, especially professionals, avoid using RAW. RAW processing increases workflow time, and when you’re busy, rather than a hobbyist, time is money…….. Source: stephenbray.com 0 FLARES Twitter 0Facebook 0Google+ 0Pin It Share 0Filament.io Made with Flare More Info'> Related Posts: Kage Collective | Derek Clark Photography Professional wedding photography with the Fuji X-E1 and X-Pro 1 | Jonathan Ryan A First Look at Capture One’s X-Pro 1 Support | Thomas Fitzgerald Cambodia – A Photographer’s Guide | Roel Dixon Mahatoo More than 3.000.000 page views on my Scoop.it page | Thomas Menk
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Fuji X-Pro2 Review Part Three: Vancouver Cityscapes, Long Exposures, and Street Photography | Ian MacDonald

Fuji X-Pro2 Review Part Three: Vancouver Cityscapes, Long Exposures, and Street Photography | Ian MacDonald | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
My original plan for part three of this Fuji X-Pro2 review series was to focus 100% on street photography.   Things changed for me a little though because of the weather on the days I went out to shoot.  The clouds were beautiful, the blue hour light was gorgeous, etc.   These conditions just begged to be shot, so I have included some of those photographs in this part of the review too.  Let’s just think of it as a using the Fuji X-Pro2 in the city” kind of review. Long Exposures: Those amazing clouds I mentioned have unfortunately brought us a lot of rain lately (welcome to life on the “wet” coast).   It was dry and sunny yesterday though, with a fairly strong breeze that was pushing the clouds across the city. The combination of sunlight reflecting off of high rises and moving clouds  always makes for some great architectural long exposure opportunities…….. Source: ianmacdonaldphotography.com 0 FLARES Twitter 0Facebook 0Google+ 0Pin It Share 0Filament.io Made with Flare More Info'> Related Posts: Fuji X-Pro2 Review Part One: Unboxing and First Impressions | Ian MacDonald FUJIFILM X-Pro2 camera review (part 1) | Björn Moerman Fujifilm X-Pro 2 | Marius Masalar From Leo to Revelation | Journey with the X-Pro2 | Patrick La Roque Die Fujifilm X-Pro2 – Erste Eindrücke | Martin Huelle
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Fuji X-Pro 2: Behind the scenes - Hands on with Spencer Wynn

Fuji X-Pro 2: Behind the scenes - Hands on with Spencer Wynn | Fuji X-Pro2 | Scoop.it
A few weeks ago, our friend, the amazingly talented photographer Spencer Wynn, allowed us to film a video with him providing his thoughts on the new Fuji X-Pro 2 camera. During the filming of the video, Vistek Product Manager Gary Goldberg managed to capture a few behinds the scenes photos of the process. Pre-order your Fuji X-Pro 2 for only $1899.99 CDN (body only) from Vistek today. Spencer was able to put the Fuji X-Pro 2 through its paces for several weeks prior to it’s release announcement. The stunning images he captured can be found on his website. If you haven’t seen Spencer’s video review, here it is in all it’s glory. Keep abreast of the latest from Spencer Wynn on Instagram ORB, CALL HOME Like an extra-terrestrial, this 15′ diameter worsen orb is part of an art installation on the shore of Lake Ontario. . #igcanada_ #ig_toronto #igworldclub #beachestoronto #6ixwalks #torontotravels #viewsoftoronto #ig_captures #ig_northamerica #art #master_pics #fujifilm #postcardsfromthe6 #ig_masters #sculpture #Toronto #totescanadian #Urban #thesix #Fujifilm_NorthAmerica A photo posted by Spencer Wynn (@spencerwynn) on Mar 2, 2016 at 7:30am PST Spencer Wynn Official Bio: A story teller at heart, Spencer’s career has taken him to extremes. Using his skills as a visual journalist, designer and photographer, Wynn has lived the stories he tells saying, “ One can only truly tell a story of a people or culture if you have lived with the people or in the culture”. Spencer is a creative person, always looking to push himself and his skills in order to stay current with technology and learn more about the diversity around him.
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