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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100s - photographer, reviews, samples and more ... | http://www.tomen.de
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Fujifilm X-T1 review | Pocket-lint

Fujifilm X-T1 review | Pocket-lint | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Verdict

Let’s get the slight downsides out of the way first: the X-T1 could do with a better battery, autofocus needs to be refined for precision, and continuous autofocus won’t keep a similar price DSLR at bay in our opinion. Oh and there are no weather-sealed lenses to pair with the body - but that will be resolved later this year as some options arrive to market. Otherwise the X-T1 is a shining example of how a retro style camera should be done. Just take a second to look at it and it’s hard not to fall in love. Those physical mode dials are well made, as is the all-metal and weather-sealed body; it’s a melting pot of design that gives the Fujifilm a distinct edge that other manufacturers have since started to try and cash in on. Then use that giant electronic viewfinder in its "full" mode and it blows other electronic viewfinders out of the water. It’s not going to compete with the brilliance that is the X-Pro1’s hybrid viewfinder, but the X-T1 has a wider application and target audience, plus as those bigger and longer XF-mount lenses arrive the viewfinder’s central placement will make all the difference in use. Add to those positives super-sharp image quality that’s hard to beat and we think that of all the Fujifilm options available this is the one to go for. It’s not without some serious competition - the Sony Alpha A7 drags a full-frame sensor into the equation for not much more cash but lacks the lens support for now, or the Nikon Df goes for large-scale retro - but Fujifilm’s tough enough to stand its own ground. We love the images we've been getting straight from camera.....

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Fujifilm X-E2 Hands-on Previews

Fujifilm X-E2 Hands-on Previews | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Some more hands-on Fuji X-E2 reviews by Techradar, ePhotoZine, The Phoblographer, Pocket-Lint ......

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Fujifilm X-E2 review | Pocket-lint

Fujifilm X-E2 review | Pocket-lint | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Verdict

The Fujifilm X-E2 gets plenty right. Although, ultimately, it's a subtle upgrade compared to its predecessor. If you’re after a CSC that’s all about image quality then look little further. We also love the hands-on layout of the build, and both retro style and retro approach to taking pictures thanks to physical aperture dials on the XF lenses. That £799 body-only price point might seem like a lot of money, because it is, but there’s a physical quality here that can be seen from a mile away. On the downsides battery life remains the same so-so performer of its predecessor, the so-called improved autofocus might be faster but isn't consistently accurate, while there could be more lenses available in the XF range to further widen appeal. But the available lens options - from primes to more "consumer" zoom lenses - is slowly growing and the quality is great. If you’re an action photographer then don’t kid yourself, this camera won’t be suitable. But if you’re after a camera that successfully marries the old school of thought with the new in a visually striking package then there's a lot to love in the Fujifilm X-E2. For those low-mid ISO sensitivities its image quality that's the real sell......

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Fujifilm X-E1 review | Pocket-lint

Fujifilm X-E1 review | Pocket-lint | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


The Fujifilm X-E1 is a compact system camera (CSC) unlike any of the competition out there - that's clear from taking just one glance at this well-oiled, retro-designed machine. But it's what's on the inside that's most exciting. When Fujifilm revealed its X-Pro1 CSC there was quite a buzz about its - rather absurdly named - "X-Trans" CMOS sensor. It works unlike anything else out there and produces image quality that punches above the weight of most APS-C sensors. Good job then that the X-E1 has ported the very same sensor to its heart, but can it deliver with equally impressive features and performance?

Verdict

The Fujifilm X-E1 is a modern-day classic, but not in the mainstream sense. It's like a cult movie - it will perfectly fit the niche for some, why others will think it's mad. On the one hand this retro-styled, medium-sized compact system camera is expensive (£1,149 expensive) and lacks the kind of pepped-up performance of something like the Sony NEX-6 or Panasonic's range of G-series CSCs. But on the other hand here's a beautifully crafted, fundamentally different, and incredible imaging machine. It's the final quality of the X-E1's shots that elevate it to such high standards - assuming the so-so autofocus and battery life, small screen size and electronic-only viewfinder are manageable considerations.

Let's not forget that there's no better APS-C sensor in a compact system camera that we've yet seen, and that's why the X-E1 is, in spite of its listed shortcomings, a loveable winner.

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