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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100s - photographer, reviews, samples and more ... | http://www.tomen.de
Curated by Thomas Menk
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Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R (Fujifilm) - Review | PhotoZone

Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R (Fujifilm) - Review | PhotoZone | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Verdict:

The Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R mimics pretty much the behaviour of the Fujinon XF 23mm f/1.4 R - and that's a good thing really. It combines an ultra-large aperture with high quality results. At large aperture settings the center quality is already pretty high whereas the borders/corners are at least on a good level. The resolution is much more snappy at f/2.8 and images are very sharp across the image field between f/4 and f/8. The very low amount of lateral CAs also contributes to the high sharpness perception. Image distortions are nothing to worry about whereas vignetting can be an issue in RAW images at f/1.2 and f/1.6. However, Fujifilm is relying on image auto-correction so this is usually a lesser issue from a user perspective. The rendering of the bokeh is impressive thanks to a smooth blur and good out-of-focus highlights. There is, of course, some bokeh fringing but that's true for the vast majority of lenses in this aperture class. The build quality of the XF 56mm f/1.2 R is very high and as such in line with the other Fujinon XF lenses. It is mostly made of metal and precisely assembled although we miss a weather sealing which should be standard at this price point. The AF is pretty fast on the X-T1 although the combo is still stays a little short of what we can experience on similar DSLRs-based combos. As already mention, the Fujinon is a bit pricey in absolute terms but high speed simply comes at a price. However, when looking at the results, it is a fair offering and simply also an obvious choice for Fujifilm users looking for an ultra-fast lens for street or portrait photography. Therefore highly recommended! ........

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Zeiss Touit 12mm f/2.8 (Fujifilm) - Review | PhotoZone

Zeiss Touit 12mm f/2.8 (Fujifilm) - Review | PhotoZone | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Verdict


Ultra-wide angle lenses are never really perfect. However, within its scope the Zeiss Touit 12mm f/2.8 delivers pretty impressive results. The center quality is great and the border and corner quality are good to very good at mainstream settings. The very low lateral CAs contribute to the high sharpness perception. Distortions and vignetting are usually auto-corrected either by the camera or your favorite RAW converter so you don't have to worry about these aspects from a normal user perspective. However, when looking at the naked raw files, you can spot a few issues. The raw distortions are actually still quite fine at 2% - this is a normal value for such a prime lens and lower than on most conventional zoom lenses for sure. However, the raw vignetting is very high especially at max. aperture. Overall we liked the build quality - and looks - of the Zeiss lens. The incorporated materials are obviously of high quality. However, the implementation of the aperture ring may not be perfect - while it provides distinctive "clicks" you tend to change the setting by (un-)mounting because it turns too easily. Just like on the Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 we weren't totally convinced by the AF but it does an Okay job in terms of AF speed and the generated noise level is quite low. As mentioned we still used an old X-E1 for the test so the AF performance is probably a much lesser issue on the X-E2 and X-T1 anyway. A key question is, of course, how the Zeiss lens performs compared to its nearest rival - the Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R. The Fuji lens is slightly sharper in the image corners at medium apertures but then it's also not quite as wide. These two extra millimeters can make quite a difference. To phrase it differently: the diagonal view angle the Zeiss lens reaches 99 degrees vs 89 degrees for the Fuji lens. Thus if you are after an even more dramatic perspective in your images, the Zeiss may be the more interesting choice.......

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Fujinon XC 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 OIS - Review / Test Report | PhotoZone

Fujinon XC 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 OIS - Review / Test Report | PhotoZone | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Verdict

The Fujinon XC 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 OIS is a fairly good standard zoom lens but it doesn't really stand out due to a number of weaknesses. In terms of resolution, the quality is generally high in the image center and decent in the outer image field. The lens relies heavily on auto-correction with respect to its native distortion characteristic which is nothing short of extreme at 16mm. Since most users will never notice this, this is probably an acceptable compromise (albeit a lossy one). The original vignetting is rather heavy at large apertures but also corrected behind the scenes. Lateral CAs are an issue at 16mm at large aperture settings especially in the image corners. Technically there isn't really much to complain about the build quality but you have to live with an all-plastic construction. On the up side, this means a very low weight. Size-wise it is a comparatively big lens though. The AF is reasonably fast and near-silent. We are not yet sure what to think of Fuji's optical image stabilizer. While it surely gives some extra potential, we aren't overly convinced whether Fuji has already mastered all the associated complexities. The field images felt somewhat more consistent with deactivated IS - which reminds us of the other two OIS lenses that we handled so far. If we had to choose between the Fujinon XC 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 OIS and it's in-house cousin, we would place our bets on the the XR 18-55mm f/2.8-4 OIS. Regarding the sum of its qualities, the XC 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 OIS is just too expensive in comparison - at least when purchased separately. These extra 2mm at the wide end are an interesting value prop for landscape photographers though and when relying on the provided image auto-correction the results can be quite attractive.


Optical Quality: 2.5 / 5
Mechanical Quality: 2.5 / 5
Price / Performance: 2.5 / 5

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Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS (Fujifilm) - Review | Photozone

Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS (Fujifilm) - Review  | Photozone | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Unlike other mirrorless system providers, Fuji follows a top down approach in terms of target audience. Thus they are creating interest among professionals and prosumers first. After the release of 3 high quality prime lenses they are now tackling the mainstream market with a standard zoom lens - the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS. You may argue that it is just another kit lens but unlike its remote cousins it is obviously one stop faster. If you buy it as part of a camera kit it is pretty affordable but its naked price tag of more than 650EUR/US$ makes it obvious that Fuji still doesn't want to play in the low end market. Interestingly the lens features an image stabilizer which is the first time Fuji has implemented this in a XF lens.....

Verdict

 

The Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS may be the hottest reason to enter the Fuji system. It is amazingly sharp throughout the zoom and relevant aperture range. The amount of lateral CAs is generally quite low with the exception of 55mm @ f/4. The Fujinon is not without flaws, of course. Technically it suffers from a high barrel distortion at 18mm and the vignetting is a bit too high at max. aperture. However, these aspects are taken care of either by the camera itself or external RAW converters so you don't need to worry from a user perspective. The quality of the bokeh (out-of-focus) blur is pretty good for a standard zoom lens but it cannot rival the best prime lenses, of course. The build quality is on a very high level but then you also expect no less from a lens in this price class. It is a bit worrisome, however, that this is the 2nd out of 5 tested Fuji lenses with a rather significant centering defect. We hope that this is not a trend that we will have to confirm once more in the future. Interestingly Fuji has modified the AF mechanism in this new lens. Unlike the gang of 3 prime lenses (18mm, 35mm, 60mm) it is quite fast and basically silent so Fuji is definitely on the right track here. Fuji's new image stabilizer is, of course, also a welcome new feature. In a nutshell - you can't go wrong with the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS ... if you can get a good sample.

 

Optical Quality: 3.5 to 4 / 5   

Mechanical Quality:4 / 5

Price/Performance:4 / 5

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Fujinon XF 60mm f/2.4 R macro (Fuji X-Pro1) - Review / Test Report | Photozone

Fujinon XF 60mm f/2.4 R macro (Fuji X-Pro1) - Review / Test Report | Photozone | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


The Fujinon XF 60mm f/2.4 R macro is the first tele lens for the Fuji X-mount system. Fuji follows a "dual mode" approach here. Being aware of their limited production resources they mixed the concepts of a relatively fast tele and a macro lens. Regarding its max. aperture of f/2.4 it is certainly no speed demon but fast enough for e.g. very decent portraits. The macro capabilities are limited to a max. magnification of 1:2 which may be disappointing to some. However, this should be well sufficient for mainstream macro photography.

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Fujinon XF 23mm f/1.4 R (Fujifilm) - Review | PhotoZone

Fujinon XF 23mm f/1.4 R (Fujifilm) - Review | PhotoZone | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Verdict

The Fujinon XF 23mm f/1.4 R is a highly attractive addition to the Fujifilm lens lineup. It combines an ultra-large aperture with high quality results. At large aperture settings the center quality is already pretty high whereas the borders/corners are at least on a good level. The resolution is much more snappy at f/2.8 and images are tack sharp between f/4 and f/5.6. The low amount of lateral CAs also contributes to the high sharpness perception. Image distortions are nothing to worry about whereas vignetting can be an issue in RAW images at f/1.4 and f/2. However, Fujifilm is relying on image auto-correction so this is usually a lesser issue from a user perspective. Wide-angle lenses tend to produce a quite harsh bokeh (out-of-focus rendition) but the quality of the Fujinon is really good especially around f/2. The build quality of the XF 23mm f/1.4 R is very high and as such in line with most Fujifilm offerings. The lens is mostly made of metal and precisely assembled. Due to its surprisingly low weight of just 300g it may not feel quite as substantial as -say- a Leica lens. However, objectively there's little to complain about except for the lack of weather sealing. The AF isn't overly fast but probably good enough for such a wide-angle lens. If you prefer to focus manually (by wire) every once in a while, the focus clutch mechanism may come handy. We would have preferred a full-time manual focusing mechanism though. Ultra-large aperture lenses tend to be very pricey and in absolute terms this also applies to the Fujinon. However, at less that 1000US$/EUR, it is relatively affordable in our opinion and certainly worth a deeper look. Therefore highly recommended!......

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Fujinon XR 27mm f/2.8 (Fujifilm) - Review / Test Report | PhotoZone

Fujinon XR 27mm f/2.8 (Fujifilm) - Review / Test Report | PhotoZone | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Verdict


The Fujinon XF 27mm f/2.8 may not be the most attractive lens around regarding its focal length but it is certainly a very capable performer. In terms of sharpness it plays in the highest league especially when stopping down a bit. There is a bit of field curvature which softens images in the last mm of the image frame so for tack sharp results you may wish to stop down to medium aperture settings. Lateral CAs are essentially absent which also contributes to the high sharpness perception. Vignetting and distortions are auto-corrected and as such not an issue for most users. However, the original characteristic is worse here with very high vignetting at f/2.8 and moderate barrel distortion. The Fujinon is a simple lens with few mechanical parts. The build quality is correspondingly high although some may not like the amount of plastic used in the construction. The AF relies on Fuji's first generation motor which is noticeable during AF operations and not all that fast either. From a technical perspective, we don't really find many arguments against the lens. However, just from its specs, it is a little slow and the focal length may not be everybody's darling. Other than the very high performance, dwarfish size and very low weight are certainly differentiators - therefore "Highly recommended"!

Optical Quality: 4/5
Mechanical Quality: 4/5
Price/Performance: 4/5

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John Westman's curator insight, November 12, 2013 9:36 AM

I love this little lens.

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Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R (Fujifilm) - Review | Photozone

Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R (Fujifilm) - Review  | Photozone | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Fujifilm keeps on rolling out interesting prime lenses for the X mount - 4 out of 5 lenses have a fixed focal length and looking at their current road-map there are two more ahead in 2013. The next building block in their lineup is the new Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R thus an ultra-wide lens equivalent to 21mm on full format format cameras. The combination of wide field-of-view and comparatively high speed comes at a price in the true sense. At 900$/EUR it is the most expensive Fujinon as of the time of this review. The Pentax DA 14mm f/2.8 EF IF, an APS-C SLR lens, costs about 25% less just to provide a reference. So we can be curious whether the difference in price also translates in high(er) quality....

 

Verdict

The Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R is a highly attractive ultra-wide lens with few shortcomings. The most important factor for an ultra-wide lens is certainly image sharpness and the Fujinon delivers here. It is bitingly sharp in the image center and good to very good in the outer image region. The very low CAs contribute to the high quality perception. Distortions are basically absent - even in RAW data - which is surprising for such a wide lens and even more so for a mirrorless one. The primary weakness of the Fujinon is the very high amount of vignetting. Most RAW converters as well as the camera (JPEGs) can (mostly) compensate this automatically though. Looking at the close focus results, the bokeh is rather typical for an ultra-wide lens - it's rather nervous - which probably originates in the aspherical design.

The build quality of the Fujinon is very high and as such in line with the other Fujifilm offerings. It's mostly made of metal but since Fuji tried to minimize the weight it doesn't feel as rock solid as a Leica lens for instance. However, this is mostly a subjective impression. Objectively there's little to complain except for the lack of weather sealing. Some users may not like the fact that it is comparatively large which is certainly true compared to a pancake lens such as the XF 18mm f/2 R. However, it is no brick either and the bigger the better in terms of potential image quality. The AF isn't really a decisive factor for such a lens but Fuji did a good job here actually - it is both quite fast and near silent.

The pricing feels a little steep but it is fair enough in relation to the high performance. Therefore also highly recommended!

 

Highly Recommended

 

Optical Quality: 3.5 / 5
Mechanical Quality: 4 / 5    
Price/Performance:    3.5 / 5

 
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Fujinon XF 35mm f/1.4 R (Fuji X-Pro1) - Review / Test Report | Photozone

Fujinon XF 35mm f/1.4 R (Fuji X-Pro1) - Review / Test Report | Photozone | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Compared to other mirrorless AF systems Fuji is providing very fast prime lenses straight from the beginning which is certainly a smart approach considering the premium brand claim. The Fujinon XF 35mm f/1.4 R represents the standard lens of Fuji's new X-mount system. Covering an APS-C image field the field-of-view is equivalent to about 53mm. The combination of 18mm f/2, 35mm f/1.4 and 60mm f/2.4 makes this "gang of three" a highly attractive setup for street and travel photography.

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Fujinon XF 18mm f/2 R (Fuji X-Pro1) - Review / Test Report | Photozone

Fujinon XF 18mm f/2 R (Fuji X-Pro1) - Review / Test Report | Photozone | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


In our first Fuji review we will cover the Fujinon XF 18mm f/2 R - one of the three initial lenses for the X-mount. Following a Fuji tradition these lenses are called "Fujinon" XF. This may be news to some but Fuji is actually a long time player in the system camera market but they were mostly active in the large- and medium format league and their Fujinon lenses earned quite a reputation till the decline of the film business - maybe google for "Fuji GX" if you are interested. Anyway, the Fujinon XF 18mm f/2 R is a so-called pancake lens - it's just about 4cm long and weights only 116g. In full format terms it is a standard wide-angle lens. An equivalent focal length of "27mm" is not so hot nowadays but it is certainly generic enough to be suitable for a couple of applications such as landscape or street photography. It is a surprisingly fast lens so it has some decent capabilities to achieve a quite shallow depth-of-field when using short focus distances.

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