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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100S/T - photographer, reviews, samples and more ...  | http://www.tomen.de
Curated by Thomas Menk
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Keith Futrell - Buck Hollow Ranch | Matthew Walton

Keith Futrell - Buck Hollow Ranch | Matthew Walton | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


It's 6:30 am in Pocahontas, AR. The sun isn't scheduled to rise for another 45 minutes. My cousin, Keith Futrell, pulls up in his truck. We load my gear and we're off, headed north toward Warm Springs. Twenty minutes later we arrive at Buck Hollow Ranch. It's still too dark to really see anything, but I already know it's going to be a good day. Keith takes me down to the lake house where we meet Tom Baker, the owner of the ranch. His usual unlit cigar already in his mouth, we have our coffee and wait for the sun to barely crack over the horizon. The three of us pile into his truck to begin driving through the 60 miles of road within Buck Hollow Ranch. Like previous features, my goal is to shed light on an interesting person, place, thing or idea. In this instance, I get to talk about all four. Keith is the ranch manager for BHR. The ranch consists of 2,600 acres of wooded and grassy landscape, nestled in the hills of Northeast Arkansas.......


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The Hunt - Images | Marc-Andre Pauze

The Hunt - Images | Marc-Andre Pauze | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Traditionally the Inuit supported themselves by hunting fish, sea mammals and land animals for food, heat, light, clothing, tools and shelter. They hunted mainly seal and caribou, but also whales, walrus, polar bear, musk ox, fox and wolf. The animals were used for food and their skin was used for clothing, blankets, tents and boats. Their oil was used for cooking and lamps. Bones, ivory and wood were used to make tools. Little was wasted, there was no pollution and, apart from natural trends, animals and people lived in harmony with a land that most people from the south would find hostile in the extreme.

The good hunters were respected, as was a good work ethic – lazy people or those that did not contribute to the community, were not. They were just another mouth to feed in a place where food could be very hard to come by.

According to Edmund Searles in his article "Food and the Making of Modern Inuit Identities," they consume this type of diet because a mostly meat diet is "effective in keeping the body warm, making the body strong, keeping the body fit, and even making that body healthy".

Today the Inuit have adapted to the changes brought by the “west”. However, the Inuit hunting tradition remains and, particularly as you go further north, it is practised with pride. In many areas the local people still hunt, fish and trap and rely on their environment for food. The President of the Inuit Circumpolar Council, Greenland, Aqqaluk Lynge, has said: “Eating what we hunt is at the core of what it means to be Inuit. When we can no longer hunt on the sea-ice, and eat what we hunt, we will no longer exist as a people.”......

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Marc-André Pauzé's comment, September 11, 2013 1:17 PM
Thank you for the curation Thomas. Best regards!
Thomas Menk's comment, September 11, 2013 1:29 PM
:-)
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Restarting the Hunting Project | Bert Stephani

Restarting the Hunting Project | Bert Stephani | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


In case you didn’t know, I’ve been working on a documentary project on hunting in Belgium for about a year now. I know hunting is a bit of a sensitive topic but that’s the main reason why I started the project: to see how it really is instead of the usual polarized opinions. I haven’t done much for the project in the last few months but there wasn’t much going on to photograph either. But yesterday, the hunting season started again and so did my project. Last season, I shot mainly small game hunts. This season I will focus mainly on big game hunting and a series of portraits but I couldn’t pass the opportunity to photograph the small game season start in Les Vallons. These kind people have supported my project from the start and have opened a lot of doors for me to enter the pretty closed world of hunting.....

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Shooting with the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f2.8-4 R LM OIS | Bert Stephani

Shooting with the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f2.8-4 R LM OIS | Bert Stephani | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


A few days ago I received my Fujifilm X-E1. As exciting as receiving a new camera may be, I was even more excited about the lens that came with it: the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f2.8-4 R LM OIS. Because I was hoping and expecting this lens to make my Fujifilm kit more flexible and all round for those times when working with primes might be too slow. Yesterday I joined another group of hunters for my “hunting project” and I decided to shoot exclusively with the new lens to give it a challenging workout in the field. The 18-55 works perfectly fine with the X-E1 and the combination is easy to handle. But I found the lens to handle better on the slightly bulkier X-Pro1. The lens doesn’t have the typical cheap feel of a kitlens. It feels sturdy and well build. The zoom action is smooth and the other controls work fine too. I’d just like a bit more friction in the aperture ring. It’s easy to accidently change the aperture without noticing it. Because this is a variable aperture lens (from f2.8 at 18mm to f4 at 55mm) there are no aperture markings on the lens like the Fujinon prime lenses. It would have been nice off course to have f/2.8 over the whole range but that would have made the lens a lot bigger, heavier and more expensive. I’ll have to get used to it but I can live with it. The Fuji’s made me rediscover the joys of working with fixed focal lengths and I intend to shoot most of my future work with those fine primes. But sometimes you get in situations were your movements are restricted and you just can’t zoom with your feet. Other times time pressure or dusty/wet conditions prevent you from changing lenses. Standard zoom lens to the rescue. Variation is often key in keeping clients happy and offering a wide AND a close shot of the same scene within seconds can definitely buy you some good karma from editors and designers. You know that this blog is not the place to read about resolution charts and corner performance. But I trust my eyes and I see that the Fujinon 18-55 produces great images which are sharp and clean with no obvious flaws. And I wouldn’t hesitate for a nanosecond to use this lens for any job within it’s focal range. Colors, contrast, bokeh seem pro-level to me.....

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