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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100S/T - photographer, reviews, samples and more ...  | http://www.tomen.de
Curated by Thomas Menk
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Fujinon XF18-135mm on the field | Eh Namour

Fujinon XF18-135mm on the field | Eh Namour | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

I had in my hands the new Fujinon 18-135mm lens for a short test. No situation could be better than the street photography during a rainy day of Soccer World Cup in Brazil. I took the train with the argentinian and holand supporters and arrived in the stadium neighborhoods. The new 18-135mm is a solid piece of glass, bigger than the other Fujinon X lenses, but still aceptable in therms of mirrorless standards. Personaly I don´t use zoom lenses on my personal work, but I think there are some photographers profile who loves it and keep it always in the bag. I used this lens with my Fuji X-T1, that is water sealed, as the new lens. It was a great test and it worked perfectly. For still situations, the new Optical Image Stabilizer is superb, I could shoot very low speed on my hand. I liked the quality of the lens wide opened, didn´t see noticeable aberrations or vigneting. Its a perfect glass for advanced amateurs, who want a solution for travel, street, portrait (with no bokeh because of the closed aperture). It lacks a wider aperture, mainly for social events as weddings, and for portraits could be better for who loves the bokeh. This lens is the perfect match of versatility and quality........

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Sipping Agua de Coco and kicking cobblestones in Paraty, Brazil | Adrian Seah

Sipping Agua de Coco and kicking cobblestones in Paraty, Brazil | Adrian Seah | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


A hop, skip and jump (ok, 4 hour bus ride) from the world famous Rio de Janeiro along the Costa Verde (Green Coast) of Brazil lies the little UNESCO heritage town of Paraty, sometimes spelt Parati, but always pronounced Para-Chee. A little piece of Portugal in tropical Brazil, Paraty was a blast from the past, chock full of old colonial architecture, cobbled streets, horse drawn carriages and old men peddling sweets in carts. A port town, Paraty is decidedly working class, and the simple, almost rough hewn architecture reflects that fact. In the 1800s when gold was still flowing from the mines up in Minas Gerais, Paraty was the port the Portuguese used to ferry the loot out of the country and to imperial coffers in Lisbon. When that gold dried up, Paraty fell in importance and faded into the annals of history, a mass exodus left the town almost empty, but it also meant that the buildings remained preserved in time without too much degradation all these years.


A relatively small town, Paraty can be covered by foot, and we spent few days there wandering about the cobbled lanes an amidst the beautiful buildings with their trademark windows. Late afternoons were spent sipping Agua de Coco on the beach, with Samba blaring from tinny speakers hung up in the trees on the sand. After our crazy time in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, it seemed a rather stark contrast that nobody seemed to be in any kind of hurry in Paraty.

And it suited us just fine.

 

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expatbrazil.co.uk's curator insight, March 8, 2013 12:45 AM

Its like stepping back in time to simpler days, beautiful,