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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100s - photographer, reviews, samples and more ... | http://www.tomen.de
Curated by Thomas Menk
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Report from the Zeiss Touit Lens Launch in NYC | Zlatko Batistich

Report from the Zeiss Touit Lens Launch in NYC | Zlatko Batistich | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

On Tuesday, May 14, 2013, Zeiss held a press event at the Standard Hotel in New York City to launch it's new line of Touit lenses for compact system cameras (CSC).  The event was well-attended by writers from various media. There was a video presentation on a big screen, followed by a talk by Richard Schleuning, Zeiss's National Sales Manager in Zeiss's Camera Lens Division.  Everyone was then invited to try out the new lenses.  A model was provided for the event, and attendees could walk and photograph along the High Line, an elevated linear park created from a former railroad line which runs along the lower west side of Manhattan.  The High Line runs right under the Standard Hotel. Zeiss Touit lenses are a new line of autofocus lenses for Fuji X and Sony NEX cameras.  Two lenses were available at the launch:  the 12mm f/2.8 and the 32mm f/1.8.  Both lenses should be in stores in early June of this year.  A third lens, a 50mm f/2.8 macro, is expected in the late Fall of this year.  Zeiss expects to add more lenses to the Touit family in the next few years. The Touit name comes from a genus of small neotropical parrots.  The name is intended to evoke compactness and agility.  The lenses also bear the names of classic Zeiss designs:  Distagon for the 12mm wide angle, and Planar for the 32m standard lenses.   

 

Some key facts about the new lenses: 

- They are compact and lightweight, in keeping with the size and weight of cameras they're made for.

- They have a metal exterior with rubber grips for the focus and aperture rings.  Interior mechanical parts are metal and plastic; Zeiss didn't want the lenses to be too heavy.

- The lenses have the Zeiss T-star anti-reflective coating, along with advanced stray light reduction.

- They have an almost circular 9-bladed aperture for rounded out-of-focus highlights.

- Color characteristics will be similar throughout the Touit lens family.

- The manual focus ring is electronically coupled (there is no hard stop or distance scale).

- The aperture ring has clicks at 1/3 stops. (Touit lenses for the Fuji mount have aperture rings, unlike Touit lenses for the Sony mount.)

- The lenses are sold with a 2-year warranty.  An extra year is added if the buyer registers on the Zeiss web site, thus extending the warranty to a total of 3 years.

- The next version of Lightroom and Adobe Camera Raw will have profiles for Touit lenses.

- The Touit 12mm is an aspherical design with floating elements.  It is currently the widest lens for the Fuji X mount.

- The optimal aperture on the 32mm lens is f/4.  The optimal aperture on the 12mm lens is f/5.6.  MTF charts are available (or will be soon).

- Zeiss chose the autofocus motor for robustness and reliability, not for ultimate quietness.

- A lens hood is included with each lens.

- Touit lenses are not weather-sealed, and are not planned for Micro Four Thirds cameras. 

 

.....

Thomas Menk's insight:

Sample Gallery

http://www.fujix-forum.com/index.php/gallery/album/505-zeiss-touit-lens-launch-in-nyc/

 

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A sort of gear review: The Fuji X-series | Greg Funnell

A sort of gear review: The Fuji X-series | Greg Funnell | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

The other day I had to make a call I never wanted to have to make. At 28 I needed to see a chiropractor - some would call it the photographers curse, a curse that unfortunately goes with the territory. Lugging heavy camera gear around, usually with it hanging from the neck, waist or one shoulder eventually takes its toll. This realisation along with some other vague and equally suspicious excuses was one of the reasons I'd been interested getting myself one of Fujifilm's X-Series cameras - the thought of having a camera that was small and light and could maybe even supplement my heavy old SLR was appealing. I knew they would probably never replace my SLR for work but as everyday cameras they seemed to offer a good compromise. In 2011 I bought the Fujifilm x100, a camera I loved to hate, a camera that for me was so nearly there in terms of what I personally was after but somehow not quite. It looked fantastic (for some reason more of an appeal to me than it really should be) and contained pretty much my perfect carry around set-up; packing an equivalent of 35mm f/2 lens. It was almost too silent when it took a photo (to the point where at times I wasn't even sure it had taken) but is small size and discretion were a big plus for me, the whole thing could slip in my pocket and yet it felt good in the hand with a nice weight. The whole manual shutter and aperture operation were a total winner for me. I think Fuji had finally realised that most camera manufacturers seemed to have failed to realise, photographers are creatures of habit, we are by and large dinosaurs, and we like what we know, and what we know works. So many cameras that come on to the market aren't aimed at dinosaurs, they are aimed at the mass consumer. Manual shutter dials and aperture rings disappeared from all but 'pro' cameras because they seemed archaic. This may well be the case but equally they were a tried and tested function that had been the norm for decades, and yet within a matter of years digital cameras had consigned them to the graveyard, much to the annoyance of the dinosaurs. Fuji it seems finally cottoned onto this and their x-series cameras are evidence of that – they’re a nod to a system that is tried and tested. Nevertheless with the x100 they still managed to get a few things wrong. They may have designed the hardware well but the internals, the menu system, was a generally nonsensical and the camera had a habit of not responding particularly fast, it was sluggish, not much but just enough, and it acted at time likes a despondent child. Luckily Fuji were a company that actually listened to its customers and the firmware updates did start to tackle these problems.......

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Random Pictures From The Fuji X-Pro1 | Keith Low

Random Pictures From The Fuji X-Pro1 | Keith Low | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Random Pictures From The Fuji X-Pro1 - Keith Low

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30 Photos of Ireland captured with the X100s | David Cleland

30 Photos of Ireland captured with the X100s | David Cleland | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

When Fujifilm announced the X100s I have to admit I was excited. I had grown to love the X100, I had grown used to the quirks and foibles of the original incarnation and learned to focus on the positives, as they were plenty. The X100s may look almost identical to the original X100 but in short it is a completely different animal (photographically speaking). The X100s is a phenomenal leap in performance and image quality to the original X100, the new X-Trans sensor is brilliant and especially shines in low light environments and as a result I am using it for literally everything. Although the X100s is only out a few months I have already taken it to most of the counties in Northern Ireland (and also Donegal). I’ve used in every weather condition Ireland can throw at it in this very long Winter of Spring. I have used it up mountains on the Northern Ireland coast, in City Hall and the dark Belfast pubs and the X100s has yet to let me down......

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Objetivos Carl Zeiss Touit para CSC – Samples | DSLR Magazine

Objetivos Carl Zeiss Touit para CSC – Samples | DSLR Magazine | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Con una cobertura diagonal de 99º  y una focal equivalente al paso universal de tan sólo 18 mm, este nueva óptica Carl Zeiss Touit Distagon T* 12 mm f/2,8 corona por el momento la cumbre angular - rectilinear - del mundo CSC, o lo que es lo mismo, ofrece el ángulo de toma más amplio disponible para cámaras compactas de óptica intercambiable, bajo una perspectiva corregida evitando las fuertes deformaciones típicas de los "ojo de pez". Idóneo obviamente para los amantes de la arquitectura, las perspectivas dinámicas y tomas ultra angulares, la capacidad de "sorprender" que tiene este objetivo con su vasto ángulo de toma es sencillamente, increíble. Ya desde las primeras tomas, una marcada perspectiva se adueña de todas nuestras composiciones, si bien es difícil en un principio amoldarse a este "nuevo punto de vista" la altísima corrección geométrica que implementa - imaginamos una labor en tándem con el firmware de cámara - hacen adictivo su uso en todo tipo de escenas. Remarcable, como ya adelantamos hace unos días en nuestra prueba de laboratorio, la calidad aportada desde sus primeros valores de luminosidad, incluso a f/2,8 obtendremos una máxima definición en el centro de la imagen, con una pérdida muy baja en los bordes y esquinas, algo complicado de conseguir si atendemos a su naturaleza ultra angular.

Visualizando archivos Raw, respecto a la nitidez, aprovechamos para recordar la importancia que tiene en este proceso el revelador usado, en aras de unificar criterio, todas las tomas del presente artículo son conversiones directas - sin edición del original - del Raw propietario de Fujifilm (RAF) a JPG de máxima calidad mediante Lightroom 4.4......

Thomas Menk's insight:

Google Translater (ES -> ENG)

http://bit.ly/14hbWyj

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Camera At The Crossroads: The Fujifilm XE-1 | Jack Forster

Camera At The Crossroads: The Fujifilm XE-1  | Jack Forster | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


The Fuji XE-1 is one of the most interesting cameras I’ve ever had an opportunity to use, and it’s also one that poses a serious conundrum to its intended audience: serious amateurs and open-minded professionals.  Thanks to Fuji USA, I had an opportunity to shoot with an XE-1, using both the 18-55 kit zoom lens, and one of Fuji’s excellent X-mount prime lenses –the wide-angle 14mm (21mm full-frame equivalent) F 2.8 lens.  I took the camera with me on a trip overseas to Switzerland, and shot a wide range of subjects under a variety of lighting conditions, and I came away with impressions that despite the amount of time I used the camera, still haven’t quite jelled; I feel as conflicted about the XE-1 as I’ve ever felt about a camera, and it points to a larger issue that has to do with where digital photography is now, and where it’s going, both technically and philosophically. Let’s get the basics out of the way first –this is one of the most sensibly designed, intelligently crafted and enjoyable to use cameras I’ve ever handled.  It’s a beautiful camera –the truth is that the aesthetics of a camera are not just a matter of good looks; how a camera looks and how it handles have a lot to do with how you’re oriented towards taking pictures, and the way in which a camera acts as a mediator between you and the world around you really is an important part of the equation.  It’s not just a matter of technical specifications –yes, it’s true that a really skilled photographer can take great pictures with any camera (within reason) but it’s also true that just as with any craft, the quality of your tools makes a difference. On that level, the XE-1 delivers, and then some.  It’s been described by many in the context of its immediate predecessor, the larger, more expensive X-Pro 1, which unlike the XE-1 has a costly hybrid optical-electronic viewfinder.  The two cameras share the same sensor –a 16 megapixel X-Trans CMOS sensor that uses an unconventional color filter system which is claimed by Fuji to allow better resolution than the color filter system used in most other digital cameras.  The omission of the hybrid viewfinder means that the XE-1 is smaller and less expensive than the X-Pro 1 while at the same time providing all the benefits of the same large X-Trans sensor, and access to exactly the same (terrific) X-mount lenses.....

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A hack/tip for Fuji X100(s) users who zone focus | NoSugar on Digital Photography Review

A hack/tip for Fuji X100(s) users who zone focus | NoSugar on Digital Photography Review | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

I've owned a Fuji X100 and now a X100s. I shoot street and usually shoot very close to my subjects , So F8 (sunny), Shutter at 500, ISO Auto (6400), manual focus at 7 feet and I am ready for some street photography. So out I go to the streets and I see an interesting subject, whip out my x100s , frame > shoot (sometimes from the hip) in a matter of seconds ! Sometime later, I retire to a nice cafe, order a ice mocha ... and settle down to browse thru my shots. Arrrrggh !!!  Fully half of my shots are not in focus. Only now I've noticed that my manual focus distance has shifted from 7 feet to 15feet instead !!!

So the issue here to me is, the manual focus ring is so damn smooth that it is very easy for me to unintentionally touch it and shift focus distances. It is very irritating when you are zone focused and need too check the evf/lcd every now and then to make sure your distance scale is correct.

 

So I brainstormed a bit and came out with a small (maybe inelegant) solution. I dug out an old inner tube for my mountain bike, cut out a strip that is about the width of the focus rings and wrapped over it. The little bit of friction from the rubber prevents the focusing ring from moving from the lightest of touches but it does not affect anything else and I still can adjust aperture/manual focus (turning the ring or AEL/AFL method) as per normal.
I've attached a pic here ...

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X100S my personal impressions | Daniel Stocker

X100S my personal impressions | Daniel Stocker | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it
Wow, this year started off as the last one ended. With a big bang and the introduction of Fuji´s all brand new X100S. A lot has already been said about the X100S. Much faster than the X100. Yes the AF speed seemed to be the achilles heal of the X100. Well sometimes it was. But lets just get this right, I was never unhappy with the X100. This was the camera that taught me photography most of all. It gave me quick response of what I had done wright or wrong. Instead of wrong I´d rather say it tough me what I had done not quit so wright. Sometimes a quit not so wright can become a wonderful picture. Anyway, I was never unhappy with the AF performance either. Especially after the many firmware updates which the original X100 had received. And with the latest 1.3 the camera was more than just usable. The AF performance was quite good. It did struggle sometimes in low light conditions but in good light it was fast enough to even capture moving subjects. But it was slow with write speed and it did lock up after taking a shot. What I did not like was the missing Q menu which on my X-E1 is a blessing. Personally this is one of the main features I enjoy most on the X100S. Now what was my reason to switch to the X100S? 

Pro:


- AF Speed is even better and more than enough for what I use the camera for
- Write speed to the card and the ability to use the camera whilst writing
- Change of focus mode switch is welcome
- MF is now near enough perfect. Split screen image is good but Focus peaking is a blessing.
- Q Menu
- Change in AF Select point to the scroll wheel is much better
- New color filter array from the conventional Bayer patern to the X-Trans

Con:
- Focus speed in low light conditions could be better but I am sure Fuji will provide us a Firmware update in the futur which will correct this.

Neutral


- Burst in resolution from 12MP to 16MP. I couldn´t care more. Even 10 would be enough for me .....

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