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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100s - photographer, reviews, samples and more ... | http://www.tomen.de
Curated by Thomas Menk
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Lilies, a softbox, and a Fuji X pro 1 | Nick Lukey

Lilies, a softbox, and a Fuji X pro 1 | Nick Lukey | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Had been looking at ways to shoot these Lilies for a few days, wanted something different than the standard flower head shot. A few of the heads had not opened so I sort of deconstructed them for this shoot. The lighting was a simple setup, using a Nikon sb800 flash head, in a small portable softbox. Set the flash on manual at 1/125th power. Firing the flash through a yongnuo rf trigger. Shooting with this flash setup could not be simpler set your chosen shutterspeed, needs to be under 250th as the rf trigger doesn't synch above 250th.  Adjust your  aperture and away you go. I placed the softbox as near as I could to soften the light. The film setting was Astia and all images were taken at ISO 200 with the Fuji 35mm.

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Interview with Matt Stuart on Street Photography, Ethics, and the Future of Photography | Eric Kim

Interview with Matt Stuart on Street Photography, Ethics, and the Future of Photography | Eric Kim | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


When I started street photography, one of the photographers whose work always amazed me was that of Matt Stuart. He is part of the international street photography In-Public, and has caught some of the most incredible images I have ever seen. I was always curious about how he was able to capture his moments. In the video interview with Miniclick, he talks about his thoughts on street photography, commissions, ethics, his interest, and the future of photography. For your convenience I have also written together a transcript of the interview below, so read more to get all the goodies. Photographs courtesy of Matt Stuart.....

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Phillip Ennis's curator insight, March 14, 2013 2:26 PM

"10% of the pictures ever taken were taken last year. So everyone is taking pictures..." - Matt Stuart

 

Not sure how they measured this statistic, but the latter part is absolutely true! Watch the interview with Matt Stuart for an interesting perspective on a growing photographic theme.

Art Jones's curator insight, March 16, 2013 10:00 PM

An interesting read

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Seeking Fitz Roy amongst the clouds in El Chaltén, Patagonia | Adrian Seah

Seeking Fitz Roy amongst the clouds in El Chaltén, Patagonia | Adrian Seah | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


A fine shroud of dust hung in the air in front of me, drifting slowing to one side and catching the late morning sun in its ethereal cloud. The trees on either side of the path were absolutely still, with nary a hint of breeze in the air, which was still cool from the night. Trudging ahead on the path, not quite certain if we were headed in the right direction, I stopped to admire the view and tranquility. Surely this had to be the right path, it did fork about half an hour ago but the other path seemed so unlikely, it did not look like it had had much traffic recently, with some of the undergrowth starting to creep towards the centre of the dirt track.


We had to be on the right track.

 

With 2 hours of walking behind us, and another 2 more before we reached our goal of Laguna de los tres, at the foot of Cerro Fitz Roy. Apart from a couple of hikers heaving massive backpacks headed the other way, we had not encountered anyone else on the hike so far. They must have been returning from an overnight stay at a refugio somewhere ahead. The coolness of the air betrayed the heat that would come later on, in any case, I was not complaining, according to the park rangers, we were fantastically lucky with the weather, it could just as easily have been raining or Cerro Fitz Roy could have been blanketed with cloud, as the name Chaltén, or ‘smoking mountain’ implied. But for the moment, the skies were all clear and Fitz Roy beckoned.

 

We forged on.

 

We had started our hike from the little mountain village of El Chaltén, deep in Argentinian Patagonia and the hiking capital of Argentina. Set at the foot of both Cerro Torre and Cerro Fitz Roy, El Chaltén is a rustic base for the many hikers and climbers that come from far and wide. The final hour of the hike was by far the most challenging, with a forty-five degree climb up a dusty trail and loose stones and rocks constantly slowing our progress. It has been awhile since we last hiked and it is evident in our ever slowing pace. Hikers coming back the other way were ever encouraging. “¡Un poquito más!” (Just a little bit more!) The vista finally opened up and stole our collective breaths away. Set before the sheer granite shard of Cerro Fitz Roy, reputedly successfully climbed by only one person per year, lay the turquoise coloured glacial lake, Laguna de los tres. It seemed almost artificial in its perfection. Our tired legs were temporarily forgotten as we stood in awe, taking in the view, until we remembered that we had to make our way back the same way we came.

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Fuji X-E1 and legacy lenses | Bill Palmer

 

Unscientific test of Fuji X-E1 and legacy lenses from Olympus, Leica (R & M mount) Carl Zeiss, FED and Cosina Voigtlander. All images jpeg SOOC, handheld; shutter speed was kept above focal length at all times. Magnified view used for focussing. Distance from statue varied with lens used in order to keep the image approximately the same size in viewfinder. All focal lengths are original, multiply by 1.5 for actual. All lenses were shot wide open at their respective maximum aperture. No images have been cropped. Images of camera and lens combinations taken with Ricoh GRDIII.

Conclusions: 1. Handholding and focussing the longer lenses is not easy; more practice needed! 2. In all cases except the 60mm Elmarit, the second of two images taken was the sharpest. 3. The best handling long lens was the 135 Elmarit. the best handling short lens was the 28mm Elmarit.

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FujiFilm RAF Tags | Phil

FujiFilm RAF Tags | Phil | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


FujiFilm RAF images contain meta information stored in a proprietary FujiFilm RAF format, as well as EXIF information stored inside an embedded JPEG preview image. The table below lists tags currently decoded from the RAF-format information.

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Fuji X100S Street Photography | Brian Kraft

Fuji X100S Street Photography | Brian Kraft | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it
After receiving the new X100S from Fuji yesterday (see initial photos), I got to hit the streets of Denver today for a couple of hours. I took the camera for a little spin and it did not disappoint. I shot all these photos as jpegs files. It’s such the perfect walk around camera. Its small size and silent operation make it easy to fit in to the activity on the streets around you and discretely photograph what you want. The added functionality and performance over the X100 make it that much more of a treat to use. I am keeping an account of my findings with the new camera–its pros and cons–and will be periodically updating and adding my thoughts. Check back for that, but also be sure to check back in about a week–as my next big outing with the X100S will be to shoot an entire wedding with it.
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KnudBR's comment, March 4, 2013 7:16 AM
Hmm I'm not thinking "Wow that X100S is a stellar performer" but rather "That new VSCO sure is getting a lot of attention"
Art Jones's curator insight, March 16, 2013 10:01 PM

I <3 Street Art

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Beautiful Italy & X-Pro1 | PeterPrism

Beautiful Italy & X-Pro1 | PeterPrism | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

No words, only X-Pro1 shots.

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Karim Haddad's curator insight, March 3, 2013 10:39 PM

very nice contrast to the images of Italy you're used to seeing... I remember crossing over from Switzerland with my friend and him pointing out how rundown Italy was in comaprison 

PeterPrism's comment, March 4, 2013 7:06 AM
Thanks Karim.
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FUJINON XF14mm F2.8 R First Day | Roland Lim

FUJINON XF14mm F2.8 R First Day | Roland Lim | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


I finally jumped the gun and bought the FUJINON XF14mm F2.8 R yesterday. I am used to shooting with ultrawide angle lenses like the Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L on full frame DSLR like the 5D Mark III, so the initial prime lenses XF prime lens like the 18mm (28mm equivalent FOV on a full frame camera) was really not wide enough. Ideally, I would like to get the XF 10-24mm, but although on the Fujinon lens roadmap, but it is unlikely that it will be available until at least 3rd or 4th quarter this year. So I finally bought the 14mm.

I have only briefly used it for a day, but I quite like it so far. So just some initial impression about this lens.

 

- The construction of the lens is first rate like any other Fujinon XF lens

- f2.8 aperture is good for indoor and night shots

- There is very little distortion

- Image quality seemed good

- Although it is certainly not a macro lens, but with a closest focusing distance of 18cm, the macro ability is not bad in emergency use

 

Here are just a few photos of the packaging, the lens itself and some test shots. All are jpeg straight out from the X-Pro1....

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Fujifilm X-Series cameras & William Eggleston et al. revisited (or - the art of composition, composition rule books & composition analysis) | Dean Johnston

Fujifilm X-Series cameras & William Eggleston et al. revisited (or - the art of composition, composition rule books & composition analysis) | Dean Johnston | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


In the comments from my previous post on the Fine Art Photographer x Fujifilm X Series Photographs, it is apparent that some people don’t care for some or all of the photographs themselves. That’s fine, for of course art is highly subjective and not all things will appeal equally to each individual viewer. I think that’s great, as it leads to an intensely wide and extremely diverse body of work, even when restricting the selection of art to the relatively narrow field of photography. At the time I was viewing the photographs in question, I did something I almost never do. Basically, I squinted with my eyes in an attempt to reduce the compositions themselves into block elements. I did this to render them devoid, as much as possible, of detailed visual information. The fine information that photographs (or any work of art) contain all help to build meaning or inform interpretation, whether this fine detail be such things as texture, small elements, smaller objects themselves, etc. My aim, while doing this, was to see the photographs as basic graphic compositions. I did this to help me understand why the photographs “worked,” because, I felt, they all in fact did work. In Japan there is an abundance of photographic publications, be they magazines, mooks (magazine books) or books. They cover absolutely every conceivable photographic related theme, including composition. Right now at my somewhat rural local Tsutaya bookstore there are two composition books available (see photos below). Typically, such books contain what I call ‘maru batsu examples.’ Maru is a Japanese term for a circle, and when used as an actual circle while marking (grading) something, means “correct.” On the other hand, batsu is an “x” mark used to indicate “incorrect” when marking. Typically, the composition books contain many pairs of similar photographs. One of each pair is (purportedly) good and indicated as such with a small maru mark, and one of each is (again, purportedly) bad and likewise indicated as such, this time with a small batsu mark (a triangle would mean half-way good or kinda okay). There is almost always accompanying text to explain or argue the point. The other important feature of these books is the visual rule section. This contains graphic examples of composition rules (with accompanying text). Boxes are used to represent photo frames, and are filled with various straight and curved lines, circles, boxes and blobs, all to show compositional elements and how they can be ideally arranged to produce (supposedly) good compositions. Let’s be clear here, this goes way beyond the usual rule of thirds or golden mean offerings, and the rules given can be bewilderingly complex and the compositional dissection quite minute. Each rule is always accompanied by example photographs to illustrate the point. Again, see the photos below........

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David Castello's comment, March 2, 2013 2:23 PM
thank you
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Quick snap with the X100S | Ian Cheung on Google+

Quick snap with the X100S | Ian Cheung on Google+ | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


I've had the X100S for a couple of days now and I am enjoying it immensely. Here are some of my initial impressions and thoughts. Bear in mind that I don't have any experience with the X100.  I use the Nikon D90 as my main camera and was using the Ricoh Digital GRIII as my carry about. 

When I took it out of the box, I was surprised at the heft, even though I had held both the X100 and the X100S in shops. I guess hearing so much about the lightness, compared to DSLRs altered my expections plus my previous carry about was a compact camera.  I've gotten used to the weight and it feels almost just right, maybe a little heavy. 

Next is that it is already doing its job.  I bought it to document my life, taking snaps of my family and friends will probably take up 2/3 of its frames. Sounds crazy to use such a camera for snaps, but its something very important to me.  I have already taken shots that I wouldn't have been able to with my D90 or the GRIII.  Most people including my kids largely ignore the X100S.  If I whip out the D90 even with a 24 f2.8 there's a different dynamic.  Ergonomically the GRIII was great but its small sensor let it down.  I always felt I was fighting the camera to squeeze out the best image quality.  Especially indoors at high ISO, most times I came out on the losing side.  So much so I stopped carrying it with me.  

The X100S is really impressive in this regard.  ISO 2000 looks great, and I do find I need it a bit.  It's better than the D90.  And it isn't a noise factor, it is dynamic range.  Past 1000-1250 the D90 files looked sickly and unnatural even when properly exposed. 

Other thoughts, the manual focus ring still has the fly-by-wire limitations.  It is nowhere as responsive as a direct coupled lens.  The split image aid works but depending on what it's over, it can be equally hard to judge if the two halves line up. 

The AF-C mode on the other hand has impressed me so far.  For keeping the focus on a moving child's eye, it works as well as a DSLR. 

I heard stories about the slowness of the SD card handling but so far I can't see any issues.  I was about to buy a San Disk Extreme Pro but I'm not sure I need it. I am using an EyeFi card that is only rated Class 6. 

Oh, one piece of bad news, I have managed to freeze the camera once.  I had to take the battery out to solve the problem.  Switching off via the switch didn't have any effect.  I think it was because the AFS/AFC/MF switch was in a in between position when I took a photo. 

Feel free to ask my any questions.  And don't worry, I am intending on using it as a creative and professional tool as well.  Delighted to hear about LR4.4

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The Fuji X pro 1 and Legacy Glass | Nick Lukey

The Fuji X pro 1 and Legacy Glass | Nick Lukey | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


When I replaced the X100 with the X pro 1, I began to explore the possibilities of using legacy glass, being able to use pretty much any lens from any system is such a bonus with the Fuji X series. As I didn't own a 60 mm I wanted something with a little more throw, a lightweight telephoto and believe me you have hundreds to choose from. Therein lies the difficulty which one do you choose. My choice was based around image quality, a nice wide aperture, and finally portability. I settled on the Zuiko, as it ticked all the boxes for me, Image quality is great, punchy colour with  good contrast and its sharp. The bonus is that its tiny a little over 2 inches tall. It balances well in the hand, and adds very little weight. The great thing about the old zuiko lenses is that the aperture ring is toward the front of the lens, making aperture adjustments is easy. Since the latest firmware additions, manual focus is achieved quite quickly and feels much more positive, using the evf and a magnify setting of 3x allows pretty accurate focus. Although you need to allow for evf wobble. Nice and sharp with a nicely rendered background bokeh is very pleasant on this lens. Colour is very natural, with no obvious colour casts, contrast is excellent, and cannot find any evidence of colour fringing. I need to get a nice lens hood for it though. Overall the lens is a decent performer, and for around £120 for the lens and adapter, gives great bang for the buck. Al I need do now is to save my pennies, for either the 14mm or the Voigtlander 12mm. All the images apart from the lens on camera shots, were shot in raw and converted using the new capture One software, more on this later.....

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Fujifilm X-E1 in the studio | Kale J. Friesen


I didn't have a videographer for today's shoot but I captured some clips during the shoot and shot a little intro, just to show you my set up for the shoot. Hope you enjoy !

 

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Fuji X-Pro 1 file - ACR compared to RPP | David Taylor-Hughes

Fuji X-Pro 1 file - ACR compared to RPP | David Taylor-Hughes | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

I've done a comparison on a Fuji X-Pro 1 file using The new Photoshop ACR 7.4 and Raw Photo Processor 64, the excellent Mac platform raw converter. Different software but I processed each with no sharpening added and only added a slight amount in Photoshop later. I used the same values for each file. Click on the link for the full-size high-res file. As many who have tried the new ACR are saying, the files are slightly softer than they were before, but unlike the previous ACR conversion, it is now possible to add sharpening to these X-Trans files without creating unpleasant artefacts. RPP still produces slightly sharper results to my eyes, but there isn't a lot in it. 
After waiting a long time to see this, I spent yesterday working on some X-Pro 1 files and it was pleasing to see the results. I have been so frustrated by the fact that I knew that there was more in the files, but was unable to get to it. RPP is great and I recommend it, but Photoshop is the cornerstone of my processing workflow and I know it well and how to get what I want from it. So for any camera I use, proper support is essential. It is now finally available.
So what went on? Was this a spat between Fuji and Adobe? Did Adobe just take their time to get round to this? We will never know the whole story, but it has been a long wait. As you know I baled out on the X-Pro 1 early when it looked like there wasn't going to be decent ACR support and I've had lots of files sitting on my hard drives that I haven't done much with, since I wasn't keen to upload what I considered to be sub-standard versions to my picture libraries. I can now get some really nice files from my original raws and they do have a different 'look' to conventional bayer sensor files.  With the ACR conversions and indeed with the RPP ones as well, there isn't that classic non-AA filter look. But then with the different sensor array I'm not sure that there would be. What is extraordinary is the ability to produce 'clean' files at high(er) ISO's. I believe it would be perfectly feasible to shoot high-quality landscape at ISO 400 and even ISO 800 with an x-trans sensor and I'm seeing a 2-stop improvement in noise levels over virtually everything else I use. This has all sorts of advantages in terms of narrower apertures and higher shutter speeds when shooting in good light, which for what I do is a good thing.
I've been very critical of this whole raw conversion saga and indeed seem to have developed somewhat of a reputation as a 'Fuji basher', but my only concern was to see a realisation of the FULL potential of these files. We do now have that and I'm glad to become a Fuji X-Trans enthusiast at long last. But lets be honest, its been a long and unnecessary wait and thats not really good enough.  For those who had the patience to stick with it, welcome to your new camera!
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Fujifilm X100s WCL-X100 Wide Angle Converter Preview | ePhotoZine

Fujifilm X100s WCL-X100 Wide Angle Converter Preview | ePhotoZine | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


The new Fujifilm X100s features the new X-Trans II APS-C CMOS sensor from Fujifilm, with no optical low pass filter, phase detection built into the sensor, and new diffraction image processing for improved image quality, which Fujifilm says betters full-frame sensor cameras. Fujifilm has shown a number of slides showing the improvements made to the Fujifilm X100, as well as details on the new digital split image focusing. We previously had a hands-on preview of the Fujifilm X100s here, so this time thought it would be good to have a longer look at the WCL-X100 wide-angler converter, which takes the 35mm equivalent lens to 28mm equivalent. Fujifilm say the conversion lens is a very high quality lens, and that under testing, image quality shows very minimal distortion....

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Fuji X100S High ISO Review | Brian Kraft

Fuji X100S High ISO Review | Brian Kraft | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


In preparation for a wedding I will be shooting 100% of with the new X100S in less than a week, and knowing I would be pushing the camera in low light situations, I wanted to get more familiar with the files at high ISOs on the X100S. All these photos were shot on the Fuji X100S at ISO 25,600 and are all (except for the last merged image) SOOC jpeg files. As an aside, I have to say that I am quite impressed with the usability of these files. Many folks are debating whether to go with/or stay with their original X100 or go up to the X100S. I will say that if you tend to shoot in low light, this may be reason alone to make the jump up. Anyone who is experienced with the X100 will tell you that if shooting at an even lesser ISO of 12,800 or even sometimes 6400, the images would be pretty grainy and worst of all, suffer from pretty bad banding. There is vast improvement in these files.

Now that is all beside the main point of this post. The main point is to talk about the internal noise reduction (NR) settings within the X100S. As I pointed out in my Pros and Cons of the X100S post, I noticed that while shooting around Denver with the X100S the standard NR (O) at ISO 3200 and 6400 ( I had yet to really look at 12,800 or 25,600 yet) looked a little too heavy-handed for my tastes. There seemed to be more smearing or masking of the fine details than my eye prefers (others may feel differently). So that’s what this is about– a look at different levels of NR on these ISO 25,600 images. I’ve posted a +2 NR, 0 NR, and -2 NR as the main images. I then posted a copy of the -2 NR file, which I took into Lightroom and did my own additional sharpening and noise reduction– the file in which I’m most pleased with, in fact. With that file, I wanted to see what I could end up with if I took the file with the most detail (yet noisiest) and see how well I could sharpen it up more and keep it clean enough for my liking and so that is the 4th image down. And then I posted those final two images at 100% crops and merged together to see side-by-side.

It may be a little hard to tell right away, but if you look carefully, you should be able to see less detail in the upper photos, particularly less fine detail in the scratches in the water bottle, and the “Canon” text on the camera on the left, as well as less detail in the body of the X100 on the right– as well as just an overall plasticy look that I’m not a big fan of. I am no longer a pixel peeper (woohoo!) and I find you can really get a better sense of the image from a more standard view– thus me showing the images in this way. But, I wanted to show the difference I was able to make with my own sharpening/noise reduction and I think it’s helpful to see that at a 100% view.

Thomas Menk's insight:

More X100s sample images on:
http://www.briankraft.com/Blog/personal/fuji-x100s-day-1/

 

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