Fuji X-Pro1
Follow
Find tag "thoughts"
4.0M views | +3.9K today
Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100s - photographer, reviews, samples and more ... | http://www.tomen.de
Curated by Thomas Menk
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

What is street photography? | Ming Thein

What is street photography? | Ming Thein | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

 

Sometimes, I think I’m a bit of a masochist. I actually like to shoot difficult subjects, and increasingly of late I’m also starting to write a lot about difficult topics. Today’s article seems like a very simple question to answer: what is street photography? The more I try to nail it down – and I spent a considerable amount of time on this before the Finding Light workshop – so I would know what to cover, and more importantly, what my students would expect me to cover. The first point of confusion comes when you try to decide what is ‘street’ and what isn’t: what about public spaces? What about museums, galleries, fora etc? Stairs? Restaurants? Hawker centers? Public transport, like the Underground? And here’s another question: does street photography always have to have human subjects in the frame? And when does street photography turn into travel reportage? You can see how this becomes confusing. I’ve decided that in general, the genre is loosely defined around several broad guidelines (at least for me; your mileage may vary). Let’s take a closer look at these.

 

Street photography is unplanned.
If you’re controlling any of the elements in the scene, then it starts to become a conceptual or even outdoor studio shoot – posed models in public definitely do not count as street photography: the photographer knew (or should have known) exactly what poses, look and lighting he wanted before beginning the shoot. (You certainly wouldn’t hire a model and get shooting permission if you had no intention to shoot there, would you?) There is also a reactive element to it – spontaneity and the ability to anticipate are both critical tools for the street photographer. You really never know what you’re going to get on any given day, and that’s what draws photographers to the genre: a never-ending source of material...

 

more...
Katie Webber's curator insight, January 12, 6:03 PM

Street photography is very spontaneous. It can't be planned if it is, it's a photo shoot of certain people. What you are taking a picture of is unexpected; it could be anything that happens. You don't need people to do street photography, but most of the time there is because you are on city streets and that is where all the people are. Buildings and objects in the streets are part of street photography. It's in public so it could be of anything with a subject. You are capturing life in action through a camera lens.

Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Gear Bag Redesign – Fujifilm X-Pro1 | Bert Stephani

Gear Bag Redesign – Fujifilm X-Pro1 |  Bert Stephani | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

 

My style, my clients and my way of working have changed a lot since I started out as a professional photographer about eight years ago … and so has technology. Therefor I started a major gear bag audit a couple of months ago. You can’t believe how much time, research, testing and thought, I’ve put into this so far and I still have some decisions to make. But I’m almost there. Since so many people have been sending me questions about gear choices, I thought I’d share my thought process with you in a couple of blog posts. Writing all these things down, might even help me make my final decisions. Let’s start with what has become my main camera over the last six months: the Fujifilm X-Pro1. I dropped some random pictures shot with the X-Pro1 in this post. A lot has been said about this camera since it came out: some very positive stuff as well as some serious rants. So there are very polarised opinions and I can definitely related to both points of view. It took me three full weeks of testing, a lot of frustration and a major firmware update (v2.0 changed a lot) before completely adopting the Fuji X-system.

There are still some things that don’t speak in favor of the Fuji.

 

Here are my biggest issues:

- Autofocus has come to an acceptable level for most uses but it’s still not as good as the latest m4/3 cameras.

- It’s not the cheapest camera in it’s class

- The range of lenses and accessories is still limited compared to systems that have been on the market for a longer time.

- I’d rather have a faster flash sync speed than 1/160

- The electronic viewfinder could be better

- There’s room for improvement in the way Lightroom handles the Fuji RAW-files....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Autumn Red 35 or 50mm? | David Cleland

Autumn Red 35 or 50mm? |  David Cleland | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

 

Poll : What is the perfect focal length?

Autumn is one of those few times of the year when I deliberately try and shoot into the sun. A a break from Long Exposure Photography I was playing with the X-Pro1 (35mm lens) and the Canon 5D (35mm lens), the Canon tends to be my video camera and the X-Pro1 for stills. Although both lenses were 35mm the X-Pro1 has a cropped sensor so the setup works more like a 50mm lens than a 35mm which is great. Over the past year I have really got to know the X-Pro1 I can control it more and I feel I get a better sense of what I have shot compared to my 5D. With the Canon I have to imagine the shot, the bokeh the detail whereas with the X-Pro1 I feel I can trust the EVF. I am constantly asked why I still use the Canon when I have the X-Pro1 but frankly there isn’t a camera around (in the same price bracket) that can beat the Canon 5D MKII or III for video quality and control. Even the onboard sound recording is quite remarkable. It is bulky, it is heavy but when it comes to video it is a price worth paying....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

I'm in love | Jon Meier

I'm in love | Jon Meier | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

 

Here's a few samples from my new Fuji X-Pro1

 

These are more of less point and shoot snapshots. I'm still learning the camera (menus, buttons, how shallow the DOF is at various apertures, etc). Shot with the 35mm f/1.4. RAW, not JPG. I've heard about the less than perfect Adobe raw conversions for Fuji's x-trans sensor and for now, I think I'll keep using raw because adjusting white balance and so on is much easier. I will experiment with JPG though because of the wonderful Fuji film simulations like Velvia and others.

 

Jon Meiers Fine Art WebSite:

http://jon-meier.artistwebsites.com/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

1 Week With the Fuji X Pro1 | Nathan Gilmer

1 Week With the Fuji X Pro1 | Nathan Gilmer | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

 

About a week ago I bought the Fuji X Pro1. So far I LOVE this camera. It has its quarks (that you will read about when I do my full review) but it has personality and elegance that I just love. Also the image quality is just ridiculous. All of these shots are JPEG right out of the camera, no editing at all. This is an extremely random group of images, but I think it represents a good sampling of the kind of pictures this camera takes. I will be posting a full review hopefully in about 2 weeks.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Fujifilm X-Pro1 – My best camera yet! | Lin Zhaowei

Fujifilm X-Pro1 – My best camera yet! |  Lin Zhaowei | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


I had been uninspired for the longest time, which to some extent explains the lack of updates here in recent months. Sometimes, it really does take a new toy to reignite your passion for a hobby. For me, it’s the Fujifilm X-Pro1 – a camera I had long considered out of my budget (despite my spendthrift tendencies), and with a sluggish AF, didn’t seem to worth the money. But it came into my radar again after I read that the latest firmware version has raised the AF speed to more acceptable levels. Given that film was getting way too expensive to use, and that I felt the Ricoh GXR system has offered little to look forward to with no new lenses in the horizon, I decided to sell off all my existing camera gear on the local online photography forum Clubsnap to fund my transition to Fujifilm.

And I am so glad I did. I chose the 18mm f2 and 60mm f2.4 to replicate my favourite lenses in my Nikon/Ricoh setup. The image quality of the 60mm is just stellar, and I daresay it rivals my Zeiss ZF 100mm f2 Makro-Planar. I intend to use it mainly for portraits, street photography and flowers, just as I did with my first “pro” lens, the Nikon AFS Micro-Nikkor 60mm f2.8. The 18mm, being wider, is great for general photography, and it's quite compact too. It's not as sharp as the 60mm, but sharpness isn't everything. Well, I couldn't just stop there – the X-Pro1 is such a gorgeous camera and it deserves the right accessories to bring out its best. After endless hours of research online and a trip to the usual camera shops in Singapore, I finally managed to put together my ideal set of accessories for the camera....

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by PeterPrism
Scoop.it!

Suggestions to improve the FujiFilm X-Pro1 | David Degner

Suggestions to improve the FujiFilm X-Pro1 | David Degner | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it
Dear Fuji, I have owned 3 x-100s (one died in a hurricane, one was stolen, and one has made it through 3 revolutions) but currently I love your X-Pro1 and use it on an almost daily basis. Especially after your last firmware upgrade it is starting to become one of the best cameras on the market for photojournalism. But it still has some rough edges that can be polished.

For me, the perfect camera is one that I can use by muscle memory without having to think about its quirks. Like a musician that can trust the notes that will come out of his or her instruments, the best cameras are trustable, predictable, and intuitive, leaving the photographer to focus on his or her art. Here are a few suggestions to make the x-Pro1 more of an artists favorite tool.

1. Adjusting the ISO should use the up-down arrow buttons at all times. Currently, if I am using electronic viewfinder the up-down arrows adjust the ISO while I am in the optical viewfinder the left-right arrows adujust the ISO. Really simple thing, but oh so annoying.

2. All manual focusing, aperture, and shutter-speed adjustments should register while the shutter button is half pressed. Currently, when I have the shutter button half depressed and I adjust my focus, aperture, or shutter-speed they aren’t registered until I release the shutter button.

3. JPG and processed RAW images should align all pixels. When I open a JPG in photoshop and then open a RAW file and layer it on top of the JPG the pixels on the left and right 10% do not align. I assume there is some in-camera de-distortion processing that is not being done with the Adobe Camera Raw. It is important that Adobe has these lens distortion recipes so that they can add it to their RAW processing engine. They have a check-box to turn the distortion correction on and off in Adobe Camera Raw, but with the x-Pro1 that check box is grayed out.

4. While in manual focus mode and using the electronic viewfinder decrease the obstruction of the focus distance indicator at the bottom of the electronic viewfinder. I can not see the bottom 5-10% of the screen because the opaque blue measuring tape blocks a large portion of the image. Either move it down, or make it largely transparent. It gets in the way of a large part of the compositional space.

5. Make navigation to the “Format” menu item easier. Now it takes at least 10 button press to format a card. You can reduce that to 3 button presses by allowing the user to press “Menu” then “Up” and looping around to the end of the menu.

6. Visually confirm where the focus is. I love the new firmware update to manual focus speed and usability. It makes the camera much more usable. But I would still like some way to be sure my image is in focus. About 5% of the time I am finding that what I thought I focused on isn’t in focus. When I am in manual focus and I hit the auto-focus (AE-L/AF-L) button or I twist the lens manual focus it would be nice if the EVF zoomed in for a split second to give me visual confirmation of what is actually in focus. Or another option is a temporary visualization of hard edge detection, focus peaking, like this. One of these solutions would make a much wider range of M lenses usable on the x-pro one.

7. Always show the Menu on the back screen never through viewfinder. It is really unnatural to hold the camera up to the eye when going through the menu options. It also freaks out the people around me a bit. It just looks and feels very unnatural. When I hit the Menu button the menu should always appear on the back screen and not in the viewfinder, no matter which view-mode I am in.

8. Make the Flash option in the menu toggle-able. There is a greyed out menu item that shows the ability to turn flash triggering on and off, but it is always greyed out and I can’t select it. The flash mode should be able to over-ride the silent mode settings. Often I want to be in silent mode, but trigger a flash.

9. Make battery only insertable one direction. This is a big physical design flaw. 1/4 of the time I am in a rush and I insert the battery in a direction that doesn’t work (I am using aftermarkets batteries that don’t have the same markings). I should be able to insert batteries by feel instead of having to look down and study them.

10. Fix the flash shoe signal so that the Canon ST-E3-RT will trigger flashes. I would love to use my remote trigger to manually control flashes on the X-Pro1 but for some reason it won’t fire. I have no idea where the problem is. The x-Pro1 will trigger my canon 600EX-RT, but not the Canon ST-E3-RT.

11. Put a break on the lens when it hits infinity and close focus limits. One of the best things about Leica is that they could be manually focused intuitively. Without even using the rangefinder, I would always leave my lens on infinity and move it from muscle memory to the correct position of focus. This is much harder on the x-1pro lenses because I don’t physically feel when I hit infinity. I know it would require physical alteration to the lens, but this would be another thing that transforms how people use your cameras.

12. I need a 35mm 1.4 equivalent lens. I know it is in production but it can’t come fast enough.  Make it good and make it fast because it will be my primary lens.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

The Fuji X Pro 1 with Nikkor and Other Lenses - Pentax K 15mm f/3.5 | Maciek Sokulski on Jim Gamblin's blog

The Fuji X Pro 1 with Nikkor and Other Lenses - Pentax K 15mm f/3.5 | Maciek Sokulski  on Jim Gamblin's blog | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

 

The second “guest reviewer” for using the Fuji XP1 with third party lenses. Mac Sokulski responded to my open invitation to participate in this community share. After going to his website, I got really excited to see what Mac would come up with. I am sure you will too. http://www.miksmedia.net

 

For quite some time, I've been shooting my big Canon DSLR. I even took it with me, when I visited Spain for the first time about 5 years ago. I would probably still be using my Canon 5D, if it wasn't for the Fuji X100. It marked the beginning of change. When the Fuji X-Pro1 was announced, I followed the news with peaked interest. Since I was planning another trip to Spain, I thought that this camera would be perfect for traveling. I managed to get one a week before departure date, and the love affair has began. Coming back, I heard a lot about different adapters being made that would accommodate other lenses to the X-Pro1. Having owned an old Pentax SLR with a few lenses, and thinking that it would be good fit, it seemed to be the right time to dust off the old lenses. I ordered the Kipon adapter, which from few reviewer sounded like a very good choice. It fits the camera and the lenses very well.....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk