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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100S/T - photographer, reviews, samples and more ...  | http://www.tomen.de
Curated by Thomas Menk
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Brilliant Performer | The Fujinon XF 18-55mm Zoom | Patrick La Roque

Brilliant Performer | The Fujinon XF 18-55mm Zoom | Patrick La Roque | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


I’ll put my cards on the table right away: I’ve developed a slightly tumultuous relationship with zooms. They’re very useful tools but I’ve come to realize they also tend to drive me into what I’d call visual laziness. When I decided to jump to the X system as my one and only kit, I also embraced the fact that I’d be shooting with nothing but primes. In fact much of that decision was coloured by my experience with the X100’s fixed focal length and the way it affected my shooting reflexes. Not that this was anything new: I used Nikon primes as well. But committing to a single focal length for extended periods of time wasn’t something I’d really done before. When I shoot a prime I need to move — Obviously; I need to walk in order to alter my distance to the subject; and while I walk my brain works, and when my brain works it notices its surroundings and finds details or angles I often would’ve overlooked otherwise. But with a zoom… No matter how much I try, it’s always much too easy to fall back to those old reflexes. Twist in, twist out. Maybe if we stopped calling them zooms in the first place. That word doesn’t do justice to what’s going on optically. Maybe instead we could describe them as multi-focal lenses. There’s definitely something pretty fantastic about having the equivalent of 8 primes on a single lens… IF you use it as such. IF you understand how to use each individual focal length in the right context, and how each one changes the entire aspect of an image way beyond making things look nearer or closer. Compression, distortion, spatial perception. Of course you can also use it to get a closer shot of that mountain way out there; but perhaps if you actually GO to the mountain, something amazing will happen along the way. Right, so where was I? Ah yes: no zooms for me. Huh…

 

SOLD?

Absolutely. As surprised as I am to say this, it’s a no brainer. Until we get the extremely anticipated 56mm f/1.2 — yes, it’s now 1.2!!!!! — This will be my 85ish equivalent. It’s a great lens to have in my arsenal, especially for studio work. If you’re looking for an all around travel zoom lens, this will certainly do the job and then some. Personally, I still prefer something smaller and less visible and the X100S remains the ultimate travel solution for me. As I said earlier, I like committing to a single focal length and forcing my brain to make the most out of it. But I love what Fuji has done with this lens. And it certainly bodes well for the upcoming XF 55–200mm. More random images below.......

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Andrei Nicoara's comment, April 25, 2013 9:00 AM
a really great review, thanks!
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Fujinon XF Lens: Zooms - Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS (Tested) | SLRgear.com

Fujinon XF Lens: Zooms - Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS (Tested) |  SLRgear.com | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

The Fujinon XF 18-55mm ƒ/2.8-4 R LM OIS is Fujifilm's first zoom lens for the X-mount; it's also Fujifilm's first optically-stabilized lens. While 18-55mm is a common range for APS-C kit lenses, the variable aperture of ƒ/2.8-4 is uncommonly bright. The X-mount lens will only mount to Fujifilm digital SLR cameras with sub-frame (APS-C) sensors. Thus, for this particular lens, it will exhibit an effective focal length of 27-84mm. This lens isn't a ''constant'' lens, in that as you increase the focal length, both the minimum and maximum aperture increases.

            


The lens is available now with a petal-shaped lens hood, takes 58mm filters, and retails for around $700.

 

Sharpness
The Fujinon 18-55mm lens is surprisingly sharp, and seems to be calibrated for its best performance in its wider apertures. Used wide open, the lens performs very well (there are very sharp images to be had at 35mm and its widest setting there, ƒ/3.6). If there's any doubt about which focal length to choose - 35mm is it, as the lens is consistently sharp from ƒ/3.6 through to ƒ/11.

Other apertures are a bit more variable. At the wider end, 24mm is very good when used wide open; stop down to ƒ/4 and it's great all the way through to ƒ/11. 18mm and 55mm are a bit more variable: performance is still very good, just not quite as great as we note at 24mm and 35mm.

Diffraction limiting begins to set it at ƒ/16, with a slight impact on overall image sharpness, and ƒ/22 shows moderately soft results.


Chromatic Aberration
While our test results show some significant impact with regard to chromatic aberration, looking at the sample images, I would be hard pressed to describe it. If it's anywhere, it would be in the extreme corners.


Shading (''Vignetting'')
There is only a slight amount of corner shading for the 18-55mm Fujinon, and that is at the 18mm setting: even then, the extreme corners are only a quarter-stop darker than the center. This is very close to negligible.


Distortion
Distortion results are surprisingly good for a kit zoom lens, suggesting that there is a bit of correction going on under the hood with the X-E1. At the wide end, there is only slight barrel distortion (+0.3%), and even less pincushion distortion at 55mm (-0.1%). There is a nice point of parity at 28mm, where there is essentially no distortion.


Autofocus Operation
The Fujinon 18-55mm uses an electrical autofocus system, which is very fast. The design is fly-by-wire, so there is no direct connection between the focusing ring and the autofocus system: autofocus results are very quick, and near-silent. Attached 58mm filters will not rotate.


Macro
The 18-55mm kit lens isn't great for macro, offering just 0.08x magnification at 18mm, and 0.15x magnification at 55mm. The minimum close-focusing distance is a foot at 18mm, and 18 inches at 55mm.


Build Quality and Handling
The Fuji XF 18-55mm ƒ/2.8-4 R LM OIS is a well-built lens, harkening back to the days of metal rangefinder cameras. It's small and it isn't all that heavy (just under 12 oz), textured in a satin black finish. The lens features optical image stabilization, which is activated or deactivated with a dedicated ''OIS'' switch.


Conclusion
Fujifilm has done very well with this lens, making it more than ''just'' a kit lens, and perhaps justifying its comparatively hefty price tag. Given that the lens is available in a kit with Fuji X-mount camera bodies, this isn't necessarily a factor: but if you're a prime lens shooter looking for something a bit more convenient, you probably won't be disappointed with the 18-55mm.

 

  
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First impressions of the Fujinon 18-55mm f/2.8-4R OIS with the X-Pro1 | Jonas Rask

First impressions of the Fujinon 18-55mm f/2.8-4R OIS with the X-Pro1 | Jonas Rask | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


This is a first for me and for this blog. A small review of the Fujinon 18-55mm f/2.8-4R OIS. I really don’t plan on making this a habit since there are tons of other sites out there that does it so much better than I would ever do. However I feel that I can contribute with something to people who, like me, has the X-Pro1 with primes but want to add the zoom lens for added photographic flexibillity. This is NOT a scientific review at all. This is just my impressions, and some insight into what it means in terms of my creativity photography wise. I will off course be posting samples as I go along.


Look and feel

There’s no doubt about it, this lens is gorgeous. Well built, solid feeling, and just the right amount of torque in the switches and focus rings. It has just the right heft to its weight, and fits the X-Pro1 build perfectly. The aperture ring is without markings, and has a nice slight click to it. There are two switches on the lens, one for the Optical Image Stabilizer and one for Aperture Priority/Shutter Priority. The included lens hood is a pedal type plastic hood. Not as great as the metal ones included with the primes, but there are nice third party ones available dead-cheap on ebay. The lens has a nice chrome ring between the manual focus ring and zoom ring, makes it look really good, and exclusive. This is sold as a kit lens with the X-E1, but in no way does it feel like a cheap kit lens. It really feels like a well crafted piece of equipment......

 

Conclusion

The Fujinon 18-55mm f/2.8-4R OIS is a great allround performer. As a kit lens, it’s one of the best I’ve ever had the pleasure of using. As a stand alone zoom lens it’s up there among the best of the normal range zooms IMHO. It would be perfect if it had a set aperture at about f/2.8. It’s very reasonably priced, and you get a lot of lens for your savings. If you, like me, is considering the prime XF 18mm f/2.0, I would instead recommend that you buy the 18-55mm since it delivers on par image quality, it’s faster at focussing, and you get some added flexibility. This lens is really great for street photography. The good fast AF coupled with one of the best OIS’s I’ve ever used makes it joy to use. The images it produces are sharp throughout the range and delivers great “pop”.

This is a great addition to my X-series system.

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Liverpool Sunrises with the Fuji X-Pro 1 | Liverpool Photographer

Liverpool Sunrises with the Fuji X-Pro 1 | Liverpool Photographer | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


For me, taking the time to watch the sunrise is a spirit-lifting experience in itself.  Every day is new, untold and full of possibilities.  To be out there facing that iconic view, seeing the day being born out of the darkness and lighting up the city where I’ve spent my entire life is quite an evocative thing to witness. That said, it’s not always such a calming experience because as the sun rises and its rays dance over the clouds, occasionally, and perhaps only for a few fleeting seconds, the sunlight skims the atmosphere at just the right angles and your eyes are treated to a fantastic explosion of colour.  It’s at those times when my sleepy mind is suddenly very alert and I’m most likely darting between two cameras I’ve got set up on tripods making sure their shutters are firing and the exposures are looking good.  And when I see those rear LCD previews glowing with same radiance, well, that’s when I don’t mind losing a bit of sleep so much. My usual kit for these sunrise shoots has been a Nikon D700, Nikon 24-70mm with an assortment of Lee filters (ND grads and a Big Stopper), a Fuji X-Pro 1 with the 35mm and 18-55mm XF lens and B&W 10-stop filter.  Let’s not forget the many layers of warm clothing, a flask of something hot and many hours to stand around waiting! The 4-year old D700 still has a place in my heart despite higher resolution offerings from younger siblings and rivals.  It’s reliable and predictable in so much as I know I can get extremely satisfying results from it.  Like a faithful old dog who knows where my favourite slippers, newspaper and pipe are. The Fuji X-Pro 1 on the other hand is still a very new camera, fashioned with classic and retro lines, but underneath its cool, dark exterior lies technology  which would make the Borg salivate.  The X-Trans sensor is innovative with its lack of anti-aliasing filter and funky colour array filter, but software companies have had decades to perfect their algorithms to render ‘traditional’ Bayer pattern sensor data so it’s no surprise there are still improvements to be had.  It’s not all bad news, though, and the X-Pro 1 still has a legion of fans with me being one of them.  Personally, I don’t find the raws that bad when processed in Lightroom.  Certainly, not as bad as some might claim. The styling is great, the handling is great, the autofocus is decent for a contrast detection based system, the sensor is relatively huge for such a small body and in my opinion packs just the right number of megapixels (16).  Crucially, the lenses are excellent (aherm, Sony) which makes the XF system such a great one.  To me, great lenses are the foundation of any system because they’re the pieces of equipment you carry over from one body to the next.  The JPG processing in-camera is good, but I’m still going to continue shooting raw because that leaves me the option of processing in-camera afterwards and because I believe raw support will improve. With all that said, what matters is the end result and whether I like it. I do. Very much so.

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Architectural Photography - Towering Sky | Ken Rowland

Architectural Photography - Towering Sky | Ken Rowland | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Architectural photography has always been one of my great interests. Capturing the essence of what an architect was envisioning when a plan was created can be challenging in a number of ways. Architectural photography requires you to take perspective into account as well as surrounding distractions as you attempt to create the image.


The Story

Pictured above is another SunTrust Bank building in downtown Atlanta. As much time as I’ve spent around their facilities one might think I was stalking them! They occupy some fantastic looking architecture in Atlanta. In studying this building, I was really intrigued with the patterns created by the blocks in the building. I envisioned a dramatic black and white image utilizing those patterns and the clouds above in the final product.


Equipment and Processing

This image was taken with the Fuji X-Pro1 and the Fuji 18-55mm zoom lens. After importing it into Lightroom for some minor adjustments I exported it to Photoshop where I applied a motion blur filter to the clouds to add some drama. I then converted the image to black and white using Silver Efex Pro. Some minor dodging and burning to retain detail in the building and it was finished.

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Katie Webber's curator insight, January 12, 8:37 PM

With architectural photography you really need to focus on perspective because of the structure of the building. Taking pictures of buildings always gives you a different way of looking at it then you usually would. When you are looking more closely at them you can see the beautiful patterns in the bricks. Architects envision there art in a certain way when they design it and that's what you want to capture.