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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100s - photographer, reviews, samples and more ... | http://www.tomen.de
Curated by Thomas Menk
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Lightroom 5 Now Available for Download! | PHOTOSHOP.COM BLOG

Lightroom 5 Now Available for Download! | PHOTOSHOP.COM BLOG | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


The Lightroom team is proud to announce the availability of Lightroom 5 as a standalone license and as part of Creative Cloud! Lightroom 5 is now available to try or buy on Adobe.com, and as a free update to Creative Cloud members. A number of you downloaded Lightroom 5 beta, and we are thankful for the valuable feedback that you provided during the last couple of months. Thanks to your input on our public forums, we’ve made more than 400 tweaks since releasing Lightroom 5 beta. It truly was a team effort that we can all be proud of. Thank you. Lightroom 5 has all of your favorite features from Lightroom 5 beta including the Advanced Healing Brush, Upright, Radial Filter, Smart Previews, improved photo book creation, and slideshows that mix video and still images. The final version of Lightroom 5 also contains several new updates including more than 400 bug fixes, the ability to share photos using the Behance Publish Service and an expanded range on the Radial Filter’s feather slider....

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Fujifilm XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 lens | Tom Grill

Fujifilm XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 lens | Tom Grill | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Conclusion:

Looks like Fuji produced another winner with the 55-200mm for its line of zoom lenses. It shows true professional qualities: no distortion, solid build, high resolution, image stabilization, and quick focus. This is a lot for a lens with a $699 price tag, much better than most zooms I have tested in this price range, and even better than some costing several times as much....

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CAMERA: Fujifilm X100S | Matthew Maddock

CAMERA: Fujifilm X100S | Matthew Maddock | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Conclusion


If you didn’t get it already, I think this is as near to the perfect camera as you’re likely to get.  It’s not only the best digital camera out there, I’d say it is the best camera ever made.  I had my reservations early on, but in normal day-to-day shooting it doesn’t matter.  It gets on with the job of taking amazing photos and gets out of your way when you take those photos.  It gives you full, easy control, over everything you need to create the image that is in your mind.  The X100 was always going to be a hard act to follow, but by keeping everything that was great about the X100 and improving those things that weren’t so great, Fuji have not only hit a home run with this one, they have knocked the ball right over the Mount!.....

 

Build Quality: 5

Image Quality: 5

Ease of Use: 5

Features: 4,5

Price: 5 
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Fuji XF 55-200mm 3.5-4.8 lens impressions | Lyle Genyk

Fuji XF 55-200mm 3.5-4.8 lens impressions | Lyle Genyk | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


When I bought the x-pro1 I did so with a specific purpose in mind. I wanted a camera that would be fun to shoot, have a lot of easy to access controls, and be small enough to carry everywhere, without being “too” small. The x-pro 1 fit the bill perfectly. Add in the excellent XF 35/1.4 and I was set. I had no intention of turning this into a system, especially one that contained a zoom, a tele-zoom at that. Then along comes the Fuji XF 55-200 IS tele-zoom lens. I had no plans to buy one being that I already had the wonderful 70-200/4 IS for my Canon 6D. I wasn’t even interested at going to look at one. Low and behold the lens found me. I just happened to be at my local camera shop (props to Imagetech Thunder Bay) when the courier driver pulled up with one in his shipment. Once opened I had to take a peek. Really, who could resist? I didn’t want a consumer grade tele-zoom anyways. So what harm could just looking do……………………….

 

CONCLUSION

In the end I gave in to my better judgement and left with the lens. A lens I didn’t need or even want. A lens that hasn’t left my camera in two days, and wont for the foreseeable future. At $699 its not near as cheap as the 55-200 variations  from Tamron, Sigma and Sony. It is far better built though, and is stabilized. The IQ is also in a different league from the budget zooms. Its closest rival would be the Canon 70-200/4.  The Canon is faster at the long end (barely), has less range,  and costs more, so again the Fuji wins here. Regardless, its all irrelevant considering the fact that the Fuji 55-200 is the only lens of the group that will fit on a Fuji body. Simply put, the lens is a must have......

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Paul Presnail's comment, June 13, 2013 2:41 PM
Anyone have information on the release date of the Fuji 10-24mm lens?
Zeigarnik's comment, June 14, 2013 3:54 AM
It seems in end of the year:
http://www.fujifilm.com/products/digital_cameras/xf_lens/roadmap/
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Thoughts on my Fuji 14mm | Karim Haddad

Thoughts on my Fuji 14mm | Karim Haddad | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

 

I’ve had my X-Pro1 for about five months now, and I’d like to think I’ve put it to good use. Up until recently, all I had was the 35mm lens, which I’m very fond of. I’ve been wanting a wider lens for a while, but I was torn between Fuji’s 18mm and the 14mm. The difference in focal length was only one of the reasons I chose the XF 14mm 2.8 R. I first put it to use on my trip to Trinidad & Tobago. My very first shots were taken at Reagan National Airport, but I used it quite a bit throughout the whole trip. When my friends and I got to the beach, I had the 14mm locked in. I wasn’t too pleased with a lot of the shots I got, but one of the main reasons for that was the overcast weather.  At first, I wasn’t sure whether or not the lens or the weather were to blame, but now I’m sure it was the latter. I took many other pictures in Trinidad, mostly on the beach. Unfortunately, I didn’t do any street photography on the entire trip, but when we got the beach in Tobago, I put the 14mm to the test once again. Unfortunately, the weather wasn’t cooperating as much as I would have liked, but I still think I got some good shots. The 14mm was often my lens of choice during the trip, not because I preferred it to the 35mm, but because I wanted to put it to the test as much as possible. But while I was shooting with it, I sometimes found myself wishing I had the other lens on. The opposite wasn’t true as often. Don’t get me wrong, the 14mm is a great lens, but the 35mm has it beat when it comes to image quality. The larger aperture surely has something to do with it, but that can’t be all. I’m no technical expert when it comes to lenses – I just go by what I see. The shot below was taken a little past 3am. It’s an 8.5 second exposure that was shot wide open at 2.8. I was trying to shoot the moon, and my friends’ shadows got in the way. When we saw the image in the viewfinder, we decided to position ourselves in the shot. The results were pretty cool........

 

PROS:
- nice and wide with very little distortion

- great bokeh when shooting objects up close

- distance and depth of field indicator

- smooth manual focus ring

- superior image quality

- solid build and feel

- great lens hood


CONS:

- price $900

- somewhat heavy

- outside gathers dust very easily

- not always as sharp as one would like

- sometimes yields problems with blown highlights and shadows


CONCLUSION: 

 

This is a great lens, although I’m still not sure that I wouldn’t have been better off with the 18mm. I’m all about the image quality, and it seems the 14mm might lag slightly behind in that regard. But the extra width and other features make up for the slight difference in sharpness between the two lenses. The images shot with the 14mm look great and they’re virtually free of distortion. Manual focusing is very smooth, and the sliding ring that reveals a distance and depth-of-field indicator is a very useful feature. The 35mm is still my preferred lens of the two, and although it is my choice for a walk-around lens, I will be using the 14mm a lot more in the weeks and months ahead. I’m looking forward to seeing what it can do with sweeping landscapes and on the streets. Of course I’ll be sharing the results. I don’t think I’ll be buying anymore lenses anytime soon.

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Fujifilm X series... Fuji X100s review..... | Ian MacMichael

Fujifilm X series... Fuji X100s review..... | Ian MacMichael | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Late last year, I was fortunate to get hold of a Fuji X Pro 1 from Fuji UK for a week and write a review based on my experiences with it. The review was in 2 parts and you can read Part 1 here and Part 2 here. I was so impressed, I fell in love with it, well, not love, but you know what I mean..hopefully! Being so busy in the following weeks, I finally settled down to buy one and heard news of the imminent arrival of the X100s. I decided to hang fire on the X Pro and wait for the X100s. As soon as I could afford it, I sent off for one. After my time with the X Pro 1, it was fairly easy to "get into" using it. However, I simply wasn't expecting or prepared for what I was about to discover. I used it around the house for the first couple of days and just couldn't put it down. I ran the battery flat several times as it was seemingly attached to me! We had a wedding coming up and I decided I loved the X100s so much, I would take it along and see if I could use it confidently in the pressured environment of a full day wedding shoot. Normally, I use a Nikon D3s and mainly a 24-70 2.8 which I l.o.v.e! However, it is heavy, obvious and, well, just big! So my thoughts were...would I be confident to use the X100s over the Nikon? Would it suit our documentary style of photography? What would the reaction of the couple and guests be? Would I feel "less" professional? Would it help with my "tennis/ photographers elbow"??? Anyone other photographers suffer with that? Mine is agony and using the X100s is a blessed relief.....

So, here are my answers, then some images with all the settings for all those who want to pixel peep. As soon as I started shooting the groom prep images, it was hard to stop. it just felt so natural, so "right" and it really did make me feel less obvious. It certainly suits our style of photography, being almost exclusive documentary. The couple didn't really notice it to be honest and it was other guests and "uncle Bobs" who seemed the most interested. In fact, one guest asked me"that's a bit of a comedown isn't it? Not a pro's camera is it?" I just laughed it off and said something about paintbrushes and paper and being able to paint....

I couldn't care less really what people may think or say, as long as the clients trust us to produce emotional and creative documentary wedding photography then a camera is just a tool for me to do that, and the Fuji X100s is a pretty good tool. Is it perfect? Well, have you ever got that "perfect" shot? Is that your fault or the camera's? Oh yea, it will certainly help relieve the pain in the elbow, though I'm not sure it will part of a prescription on the NHS any time soon...imagine that!!  It is a joy to use. I can't help but agree with the reviews by Zack Arias and Bert Stephani...this is the best camera I have used. It's small, feels right, looks right, produces stunning images and feels like an extension of my eye/ mind/ heart/ soul. It's the best, in my opinion, not because of one outright performance factor, but because of the sum of the parts. It really just gets out of the way and allows you to shoot. I had a short street photography trip a couple of days after it arrived and you can see the results on my personal project site A Simple Mind. So much has been the impact so that it has made me think about what my gear bag may contain in the next couple of years. At the moment, I can honestly see us covering complete weddings with a couple of these and maybe an X Pro 1, which I could get for less than the price of, say, a new Nikon D4. The summer is going to go a long way to help making that decision as I use it more and more at weddings...as I'm writing this down, I'm finding it hard to believe I'm saying these things, but there you go. Sometimes, one just knows when something is right, and, for me, the X100s is simply that, right. We'll see what happens over the coming weeks and months.....

Thomas Menk's insight:

Thx for sharing ian :-)

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Fuji XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 R LM OIS Hands-on … plus more interesting news about the X system | MirrorLessons

Fuji XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 R LM OIS Hands-on … plus more interesting news about the X system | MirrorLessons | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

I was given a mere ten minutes to try it, as other people were waiting in line to test it as well, and it was the only sample available. Also, the lens was a prototype, very close to the final version. In that brief time, I used it on an X-Pro 1 and took a couple of pictures around the block. The lens is not too heavy and I find it well balanced with the X-Pro 1 in terms of both weight and ergonomics. The zoom ring wasn’t as smooth as others I’ve tried, but it could be related to the sample I used. Also, the aperture ring, as with other XF lenses, is a little bit too soft and you can inadvertently change the aperture. Since I had such a short window of time, I concentrated on bringing home some interesting shots. I wanted to try the zoom at its fastest apertures but I didn’t realize that I had accidentally changed it to 5.6 the whole time I was out with the lens. Anyway, the blame’s on me! This lens is the first telephoto lens for the X system and Fuji seems to have made it right: the quality is there. It is very sharp, with a nice bokeh that seems to be more pleasant to the eye than traditional telephoto zoom lenses without the constant aperture like this one. The lens is stabilized and while I didn’t try it much, I took a few shot at less than 1/100s and it responded very well. The minimal focus distance is more than acceptable for this type of lens, but don’t expect close macro performance here. It is indeed an interesting lens for those interested in chasing animals in the park or for portraits. Its non-constant aperture won’t make it ideal in low-light performance. As for the autofocus, the X-Pro 1 handed to me had the latest firmware on it that support this new lens, and that is suppose to enhance the autofocus on the X-Pro 1 as well. Again, 10 minutes isn’t enough to judge a lens, but it seems that it possesses the normal Fuji autofocus speed found in the X-pro line, so nothing terribly fast.....

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Heather Broster's comment, May 12, 2013 1:50 AM
Thanks for sharing Thomas!
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Supergrandangolo per la serie X | Amedeo Novelli

Supergrandangolo per la serie X | Amedeo Novelli | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Avere tre giorni di tempo per organizzare e realizzare un test di un obiettivo non è esattamente il sogno di chiunque debba scrivere una recensione. L'idea di essere il primo a poterlo fare però rischiava di essere una tentazione irresistibile e così è stato. Il nuovo Fujinon XF-14 Super EBC è arrivato in redazione giovedì sera, mentre a Milano il tempo cominciava a volgere al brutto, complicando ulteriormente le cose nella pianificazione dei test da compiere entro lunedì mattina, data di riconsegna del nuovo obiettivo. Tolto dalla sua confezione il 14mm ha fatto subito una buona impressione "fisica". Corpo metallico dall'aspetto solido, generoso paraluce e un fermo per la ghiera della messa a fuoco tanto utile quanto ben congegnato. La ghiera che regola il diaframma, invece, è sembrata subito piuttosto lasca e troppo sensibile così come peraltro ci era stato detto dai responsabili Fujifilm al momento dell'invio, spiegando che si trattava di un "difetto" dei primi sample disponibili per i test. Dopo aver passato un po' di tempo a soppesare fisicamente l'XF-14 ho deciso di cominciare dalle odiate foto di "gattini" e simili che tanto spopolano su FB e Flickr e che personalmente tollero poco. Questa specie di contrappasso era però inevitabile: tutto sommato la pelliccia della più piccola dei miei tre mici sarebbe stato un buon banco di prova per capire le doti del nuovo obiettivo almeno quanto a definizione e capacità di restituire i particolari anche più piccoli. Più o meno all'ora del tramonto ho così scattato una serie di ritratti a distanza piuttosto ravvicinata e variando sia diaframma che ISO, operando sempre in priorità di apertura. Le immagini analizzate successivamente hanno fornito un primo riscontro positivo. Come si vede facilmente ingrandendo l'immagine in scala 1:1, il Fujinon 14mm ha garantito un'ottima definizione di tutti i dettagli anche dei più piccoli, come per esempio il riflesso delle ciglia all'interno dell'iride o la trama della pelliccia in tutte le sue sfumature. Al centro l'immagine è perfetta e solo allontanandosi verso le zone più periferiche dell'inquadratura si può trovare una lieve perdita di dettaglio, cui però non corrisponde una caduta di luce. La distorsione prospettica è quella tipica di una lunghezza focale così corta ma non è eccessiva e, gestendo bene l'inquadratura, le linee curve sono quasi invisibili. Per riuscirci, se non si ha un treppiede a disposizione, meglio affidarsi alla "bolla digitale" della X-Pro 1 usata per il test.....

Thomas Menk's insight:

Google Translater (ITA -> ENG)
http://bit.ly/173MaSl

 

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Fuji X100s Review - Fallin'in Love All Over Again | Luminous Landscape

Fuji X100s Review - Fallin'in Love All Over Again | Luminous Landscape | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

So you're dating this great gal.  She smart, cute, and good company.  She seems to really care for you and gives you most of what you need. You take her everywhere. Your friends like her. You think this could be the one.  Then, one day, her folks invite you over and introduce you to her sister. See where I'm going with this? At first glance, they look just like twins.  If you look closely, the younger sister's hair is done a little different, and she's in slightly better shape. For the most part, however, the differences seem  trivial.  But then she comes over and sits down, and you start to talk.  She got a quick wit. Real quick. Smarter than her sister, clearly, and a lot more insightful. Her tastes are more refined and she can hold her own on any topic.  And man, she gets you like you've know each other forever! She finishes your sentences and laughs at your jokes. You're in serious trouble brother.... And so it is with the Fuji X100s.  So much like her older sister, but with so much more going on beneath the skin. Because this is a romance-rekindled kind of article, a lot oof what follows focusses on improvements on shortcomings over the X100, and things I would still like to see improved.  All of that might give the impression that the X100s isn't a great camera in it's own right. It ain't so.  If this were a stand-alone review of a brand-new machine, without a rich family history, the bottomline would be this:the X100s is the best rangefinder-style camera Fuji has made.  It produces even superb images, focuses faste processes fast and breaks every meaningful barrier to working in low light.  All-around it is all good.  That said, my detailed review follows......

Conclusion

Fuji has momentum, and it's not stopping. While the market for point-and-shoots has been dramatically eroded by smartphones, and APS-C SLRs are under pressure from ever more-capable EVF machines, Fuji has created a vibrant market of retro-yet-ultra-contemporary cameras -- like the X100s.  These machines capture perfectly the contemporary ethos of Ihassle-free nstagram-style photography, yet do it in a fully professional package. Work remains to be done on their control-set, but Fuji has made tremendous strides with this innovative line of cameras.  I can't wait to see what they come up with next. In the meantime, let the new street and travel king be crowned!

 

 

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THERE’S A BETTER WAY – Fuji X100s review | Olaf Sztaba

THERE’S A BETTER WAY – Fuji X100s review | Olaf Sztaba | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Remember when you bought your first digital SLR camera? You thought, “What a piece of engineering!” You opened the box and took the first glance as excitement and joy ran through your veins. No more film, no more limitations and the ability to take as many photos as you want. The world was your oyster. You went through the manual and the number of options, menus and settings left you gasping. While the battery was still charging you were already planning your first photo endeavour. Then you ran outside with your shiny new camera and started shooting like mad. After all, with digital there are no limits. In the evenings you hit the Internet. You were sure you had the best camera on the market. You read all the reviews that were proving your point. But wait, you thought, “Maybe I should get a better lens, a better-rated lens.” You scratched together all the money you could and bought a huge, beautiful pro-rated lens. “Now I can take really stunning photos!” you cried. You drove to the nearest park and photographed everything around you: benches, trees, leaves, people, even hydrants. You uploaded your photos, looked at them at 100%, and admired sharpness and dynamic range. Again, you went on the Internet, hit the blogs, forums and ratings and thought, “If only I had a telephoto lens, I could take even more amazing photos.” The next day you visited your local dealer and came back with a massive telephoto 2.8 pro-rated. WOW!


But wait! Another question hit you. “How I am going to carry all this equipment?” You ran back to the store and picked the largest and best camera backpack you could afford. Daily you carried the backpack with your expensive SLR and superb lenses and took hundreds of photos. Sure the bag was heavy and the camera overwhelming but you told yourself, “This is the price I have to pay for top quality.” You justified an inconvenience. You kept uploading your photos to the computer, then processing and uploading them on the Internet. Next, you repeated your mantra about your camera’s superiority. You followed this sequence religiously every day. But despite your best efforts, photography had become an almost robot-like endeavour. Then it hit you. Something was not right! You noticed that others were taking much more interesting photos that were more engaging, more powerful. You went through them, you counted every pixel and you compared. Sure their photos were not as sharp as yours, the resolution was lower, the dynamic range was nowhere near yours but somehow their images were so much better and more interesting. You grumbled to yourself, “It is not possible! After all, I spent thousands on my equipment and I feel I am going nowhere!” You nervously studied the 300-page manual and asked yourself, “Maybe I am missing some settings? If only I knew how to set up…” You fell asleep with the manual as your pillow. Next day in the field you set up a tripod, put your brand new, huge, super-fast lens on your camera, went through your settings, played with all the buttons and you came back home… with even more mediocre photos. Your frustration was growing. Where is the joy? Where is the passion? Should I buy a better lens? Should I change my in-camera settings? Weeks and months passed and you left your heavy backpack at home more often. You became unengaged and uninspired. You started avoiding photography. What a chore it had become! You think, “Maybe that’s just how it is. Maybe I am overreacting. Maybe this is the new normal.”  The following day you bumped into a kid next door and he showed you a few photos he had taken with his iPhone. You immediately dismissed the quality and told him to buy a real camera but deep down you admired his images, creativity and passion. You went home depressed and discouraged. Then, one day you came across your old friend who was holding a small and interesting camera. Out of respect and curiosity, you took it, looked through the viewfinder and played with the controls. At first, you felt hostile towards this tiny camera. After all, at home you had whole backpack of expensive gear. But deep inside you had a strange feeling. Something drew you closer. It was the strange but familiar feeling you had when you shot Leica or Contax film cameras. You could not stop thinking about the little camera you held in your hands today. After a few days of internal struggle you decided to go for it. You realized what had been missing.


How many of you have had a similar experience? I did.........

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PeterPrism's comment, May 3, 2013 2:08 PM
Thomas you are mentioned in this article "Finally, “Scoop It” by Thomas Menk should be bookmarked and followed; it has great photographs and insights." Cheers
Thomas Menk's comment, May 4, 2013 12:12 AM
Thx Peter for your comment and thx to Olaf for his nice mention :-)
Michael Petersen's curator insight, May 4, 2013 5:44 PM

There are so many new camera coming out it is hard to keep up

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Fujinon XF Lens: Primes - Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R (Tested) | SLRgear

Fujinon XF Lens: Primes - Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R (Tested) | SLRgear | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

The Fujinon XF 14mm ƒ/2.8 R was released in February 2013, offering a wide-angle field of view for Fuji's X-mount camera bodies. At the time of writing, this includes the Fuji X-E1 and the X-Pro1. Both of these bodies use an APS-C sensor with a 1.5x ''crop factor'', thus the 14mm lens offers an equivalent field of view of 21mm. The lens ships with a petal-shaped hood, takes 58mm filters and is available now for around $900.

Please note that if you're an existing X-E1 or X-Pr