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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100s - photographer, reviews, samples and more ... | http://www.tomen.de
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Fujifilm X-E1 review | Trusted Reviews

Fujifilm X-E1 review | Trusted Reviews | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Fujifilm X-E1: Verdict


While it might be tempting to think of the X-E1 as a stripped back X-Pro1, that does it something of a disservice in that the X-E1 is a great camera in its own right. Gifted with the same premium grade construction and finish, the X-E1 feels more refined and balanced than it’s more expensive sibling. While some may lament the removal of the hybrid viewfinder found in the X-Pro1, the truth is that the X-E1’s sharper, crisper EVF more than makes up for this, though the rear screen remains, at 2.8in and 460k-dots, somewhat underpowered for a camera of this price. Our only other issue is the autofocus performance and while this has certainly been improved from the X-Pro1, it’s still not as fast or as responsive as what’s offered by other CSCs. These issues aside, and the X-E1 is a joy to shoot with. By far the biggest selling point of the X-E1, however, is its sensor. The quality of the results and the detail rendered is excellent, delivering images that are some of, if not the best we’ve seen from an APS-C sized sensor.

 

Scores In Detail

Build Quality 8/10

Design & Features 8/10

Image Quality 9/10

Value 8/10

 

Our Score 8/10

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Shooting with the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f2.8-4 R LM OIS | Bert Stephani

Shooting with the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f2.8-4 R LM OIS | Bert Stephani | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


A few days ago I received my Fujifilm X-E1. As exciting as receiving a new camera may be, I was even more excited about the lens that came with it: the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f2.8-4 R LM OIS. Because I was hoping and expecting this lens to make my Fujifilm kit more flexible and all round for those times when working with primes might be too slow. Yesterday I joined another group of hunters for my “hunting project” and I decided to shoot exclusively with the new lens to give it a challenging workout in the field. The 18-55 works perfectly fine with the X-E1 and the combination is easy to handle. But I found the lens to handle better on the slightly bulkier X-Pro1. The lens doesn’t have the typical cheap feel of a kitlens. It feels sturdy and well build. The zoom action is smooth and the other controls work fine too. I’d just like a bit more friction in the aperture ring. It’s easy to accidently change the aperture without noticing it. Because this is a variable aperture lens (from f2.8 at 18mm to f4 at 55mm) there are no aperture markings on the lens like the Fujinon prime lenses. It would have been nice off course to have f/2.8 over the whole range but that would have made the lens a lot bigger, heavier and more expensive. I’ll have to get used to it but I can live with it. The Fuji’s made me rediscover the joys of working with fixed focal lengths and I intend to shoot most of my future work with those fine primes. But sometimes you get in situations were your movements are restricted and you just can’t zoom with your feet. Other times time pressure or dusty/wet conditions prevent you from changing lenses. Standard zoom lens to the rescue. Variation is often key in keeping clients happy and offering a wide AND a close shot of the same scene within seconds can definitely buy you some good karma from editors and designers. You know that this blog is not the place to read about resolution charts and corner performance. But I trust my eyes and I see that the Fujinon 18-55 produces great images which are sharp and clean with no obvious flaws. And I wouldn’t hesitate for a nanosecond to use this lens for any job within it’s focal range. Colors, contrast, bokeh seem pro-level to me.....

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Fuji X-E1 Review – The Why and The How | Martin Castein

Fuji X-E1 Review – The Why and The How | Martin Castein | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

 

My thoughts:

If you are coming from a DSLR you will have a bit of a learning curve. The camera behaves very differently to a DSLR. It makes you think and slow down. You cant brute force your way through a shoot. You have to be more thoughtful and considerate. This is a big plus in many ways. I like this about it. My first reaction was give me the through the lens view of a DSLR. I was frustrated. This camera will initially frustrate you, the electronic viewfinder is irritating at first, this comes from not understanding what the camera is all about though. Be prepared for this. You need to learn to shoot in a different way. I felt like I was on a steep learning curve. I even questioned if I had done the right thing. But then I said to myself I need to really shoot this camera how it was asking me to shoot it. And then it came to life. You have to stop thinking how a DSLR thinks. This is hard to put into words. In many ways this camera is faster than a DSLR, bare with me. If the DSLR were a machine gun then the X-E1 is a sniper rifle. You cant shoot a sniper rifle like a machine gun and so you have to change the way you shoot. The X-E1 is about the single shot – nailed it way of shooting. This is a delightful way to make photographs and it can be faster. Once you are in the right frame of mind it is addictive and each click is rewarding. The pictures are stunning. I can imagine putting the D700 in the boot of the car for large sections of a wedding and just go around with this tiny camera......

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Fujifilm X-E1 Review | EPhotoZine

Fujifilm X-E1 Review | EPhotoZine | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


The Fujifilm X-Pro1 and X-E1 are the definition of retro digital cameras, and the moment you pick it up, you'll be reminded of an old film camera from the past. With manual controls on the lens and body it is very easy to adjust settings and the menus and controls are well thought out and easy to get to grips with. The electronic viewfinder is excellent with an extremely high resolution and is great to use, although it's a shame the 2.8inch screen isn't larger and a higher resolution. The Fujifilm X-E1 is more compact than the X-Pro1, and also 100g lighter, but it is still quite a large camera, and feels extremely well built. Focus speed and responsiveness is good, and the camera takes excellent photos with extremely impressive noise performance, with a good 18-55mm kit lens with built in optical image stabilisation. Although the price is still quite high compared to the competitors with many of them available for less money with kit lens. The X-E1 is available for £729 body only, which is good value for money, however, each Fujinon lens available is around £425+ so the price quickly jumps to the top of the premium mirrorless market. Another limiting factor of the system is the choice of lenses, with few lenses made by third parties available. If you have the money, then the X-E1 is an excellent camera, and the lenses available are excellent, particularly the primes. The Fujifilm X-E1 produces images with extremely low noise, and excellent colour.....

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More than 1.000.000 clicks on my Fuji X-Pro1 page at Scoop.it | Thomas Menk

More than 1.000.000 clicks on my Fuji X-Pro1 page at Scoop.it | Thomas Menk | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

 

Wow, more than 1.000000 clicks on my Scoop.it page this year!

 

Thank you so much for your supporting :-)

 

Here some stats about this page:

 

- more than 1150 posts about the Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1

- more than 500 stories about all kind of Fuji X-System Photographers

- more than 300 reviews about the Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1

- more than 200 posts about lenses for Fuji X-Systems

- more than 100 articles about the aspects of digital photography

 

If you have great pictures, storys about Fuji Photographers, reviews, tips and tricks, rumors, comparision tests, impressions and more about the Fujifilm X-Pro1 - X-E1 and there lenses, feel free to send me your suggestion :-) If your are looking for a better categorisation of this articles or better search function you can visit my blog on http://www.tomen.de

 

Hope of further collaboration and good light for everyone :-)

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Carlos Marques's comment, December 9, 2012 4:59 AM
Well after testing the Pro x 1 camera with Leica lenses the M9 looks like the little brother .
Tom Leuntjens's comment, March 21, 4:13 PM
well earned!
Thomas Menk's comment, March 21, 4:21 PM
Thanks for sharing TOM :-)
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Impressions of the Fujinon XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 lens | sgoldswoblog

Impressions of the Fujinon XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 lens | sgoldswoblog | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


This is a very good lens and should be in any self respecting Fuji X-Pro1 or X-E1 owners bag. It feels solid and is very well screwed together. I’ve had rubbish weather to test out this lens and I’m upset I cannot replicate the very bright conditions on Sunday when I first road tested the lens. Nonetheless the rubbish weather has enabled me to confirm the lens OIS works well…


Using it with the X-Pro1 OVF takes some getting used to in that the size of the frame is tiny at full zoom. That say, it is perfect for action shots as you can see what is happening around the frame. I didn’t mind using it with the OVF in that way but I preferred to use it with the EVF. The lens has a fast and (scarily) quiet auto-focus mechanism and uses an internal focusing system, which means the front element and filter thread does not rotate on focus. Focus speed is very good, much better than any of the primes except the 18mm, and I suspect the original primes will be quietly upgraded to use the linear motors used in this lens over time. However, sometime the 18-55 feels more inaccurate at focusing than the primes. This seems to be some that was addressed in firmware for the primes so I wouldn’t be too worried about it right now. The lens is very sharp and compares well with constant aperture zooms I have used. By way of comparison I think it compares favourably to the 12-35 for M43s in that it is almost as quick to focus, is ultra sharp (though the sensor helps here) and the OIS is very good. Also the 12-35 suffers badly from CA on Olympus bodies. The 18-55mm only really loses out because of its aperture – ultimately the 12-35mm is better in low light because of that. Distortion isn’t too bad and is only really noticeable for me at 18mm (note, distortion is corrected in body). There is some barreling at 18mm, but no pincushion distortion I noticed at the 55mm setting. Bokeh is very good at 55mm but is a little busy at 18mm. Vignetting is not a problem. Quibbles aside this is a very good lens and is a steal for the £529 I’ve seen it advertised for. Basically, get it as soon as you can. You won’t regret it!

 

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Fuji XE-1 vs Sony NEX-6 Shootout | Chris Niccolls


If you're looking for a small mirrorless camera with a viewfinder, the Fuji X-E1 and Sony NEX-6 are two of the best options out there. But which is the better choice for your style of shooting? The Camera Store's Chris Niccolls and Dave Paul put these two powerful compacts to the test!

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Distraction: new Fujifilm X-E1 | Mike Mander

Distraction: new Fujifilm X-E1 | Mike Mander | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


And what a lovely, compact, lightweight interchangeable lens body it is! In photos, the X-E1 doesn't look all that much smaller than an X-Pro1, however in the hand it somehow works to seem a great deal smaller and lighter than the X-Pro1, mostly in a good way too. The X-E1 is everything I had hoped for in an interchangeable lens successor to the X100... well almost. The only thing I miss is the exceptional Hybrid-VF that both the X100 and the X-Pro1 have. In its place though, the X-E1 has an excellent 2.4 million dot OLED electronic viewfinder, and it is substantially improved over the EVF mode in its predecessors, however sadly the X-E1 does not have the optical viewfinder component. One major benefit I've seen from shooting with the X-E1 for the last few weeks, is the accuracy of the exposure preview in the new EVF. You really can judge what the final shot is going to look like from an exposure standpoint with accurate contrast, white-balance and saturation, far better than the rear-LCD, and there doesn't seem to be any additional shadow or highlight clipping due to the EVF itself, unlike my experience with many other cameras. In addition, the new EVF is sharp, has good eye-relief, has a diopter adjustment again (the X-Pro1 needed accessory thread-in diopters) and it gains up well in very low light levels without getting too grainy, allowing for ease of framing your shot even when you can hardly see the scene with your naked eye! The loss of the Hybrid-EVF is unfortunate though, since being able to see slightly outside the camera's captured field-of-view in a "rangerfinder-ish" fashion means you get a fraction of a second more warning when something is about to enter the scene, allowing you to perhaps nail that perfect moment. However, one thing that makes losing the Hybrid-VF more palatable, besides the excellent new EVF, is the $700 price drop from the the X-Pro1! The X-E1 body sells for only $999. Apart from the Hybrid-VF, did anything else important get lost? Amazingly enough no... from a performance and image quality standpoint, the X-E1 seems pretty much identical to the X-Pro1. It has the same 16 megapixel X-Trans sensor, sharp due to it not having an anti-aliasing filter, the same newly swift and accurate autofocus, more or less the same controls and ergonomics but in a smaller and lighter body. Really, the only other thing it doesn't have is the rock-solid all-metal construction of the X-Pro1. It does feel lighter and a little cheaper in the hand since a bit more plastic is used in its construction, but after a few minutes of use, the lightness was no longer a distraction and indeed, the lighter weight is quite welcome actually.....

 

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Fujinon Super EBC XF18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS lens | Photo Review

Fujinon Super EBC XF18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS lens | Photo Review | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

 

The compact Fujinon Super EBC XF18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS lens is the first zoom lens for X mount camera bodies. Covering the same angles of view as a 27-84mm lens in 35mm format, it has a maximum aperture range of f/2.8 to f/4. The all-glass lens structure consists of 14 elements in 10 groups and includes three aspherical elements and one extra low dispersion element. A seven-blade rounded diaphragm and a minimum focus distance of 18 mm enables close-up shots to be produced with attractively blurred backgrounds and the perspective that characterises wide angle lenses. A fast linear focusing motor takes advantage of the high-speed signal readout of the CMOS sensor and the newly developed EXR Processor Pro to enable contrast-detection focusing in as little as 0.1 seconds. Autofocusing is also virtually silent, enabling the lens to be used for video recording. The optical and mechanical designs of the lens are optimised to keep it compact at only 65.0 x 70.4 mm (in the wide position). The lens is equipped with an aperture ring and includes a built-in Optical Image Stabiliser (OIS) with a claimed advantage of up to four f-stops of shake reduction.

 

Conclusion
In terms of build quality and performance, the Fujinon Super EBC XF18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS is decidedly superior to the average kit lens and very pleasant to use. All the common aberrations have been addressed effectively and centre sharpness is excellent, with edge softening admirably low.

Focusing and zooming are smooth and quiet enough to be used while recording movies and internal focusing enables filters to be used without hassles. The only disincentives are the relatively high price and the fact that only two camera bodies can accept it.

 

Buy this lens if:

- You want capable general-purpose lens for Fujifilm interchangeable-lens cameras.
- You require good edge-to-edge sharpness.
-You want fast and quiet autofocusing and zooming.
-You require built-in image stabilisation.

 

Don’t buy this lens:

- For macro photography and extreme close-ups.
- If you're concerned about size and weight.

 

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Fuji X-E1, the first real digital LEICA for all of us | Mike Kobal

Fuji X-E1, the first real digital LEICA for all of us | Mike Kobal | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

 

The X-E1 does pretty much what the X Pro-1 does in a smaller, lighter package, featuring the same superb X Trans image sensor and a better, higher resolution EVF. It doesn’t pretend to be a rangefinder. The no nonsense form follows function design approach pays off and we get a clean, sleek looking camera body. Personally, I think the X-E1 is one of the best looking digital cameras out there. The X-E1 is almost identical in button/dial layout to the X Pro 1. In addition there is a pop up flash, a 2.5mm stereo mic socket and an electronic shutter release option. A full metal body with a solid tripod socket. So, what do we loose and what do we gain? We get a slightly smaller, lesser quality rear LCD and we loose the unique hybrid optical/electronic viewfinder. With this latest release Fuji improves auto focus speed and makes significant manual focus enhancements, now a joy to use with their own and 3rd party lenses. Hurray! X Pro 1 owners can download the latest firmware and enjoy the same improvements we get in the X-E1 right out of the box.

 

First impressions:
I love shooting with the X-E1. It is just the right size, smaller then the X Pro1 and slightly larger then the X100. I am a big fan of manual aperture and shutter speed dials, being able to see those settings instantly, even when the camera is turned off, is a huge plus. The discreet shutter sound makes candid shooting easy. Autofocus is extremely accurate, especially when shooting wide open with the 35mm 1.4, but the real quantum leap occurs when in manual focus, with native Fuji and 3rd party lenses. Fuji gets it right this time and kudos for listening and updating the firmware. Update: I planned to compare it to the Sony Nex 6, unfortunately the package arrived in such bad shape I had to decline delivery :( – will update this post once the replacement arrives...

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The Switch | Peter and Louise Burkwood

The Switch | Peter and Louise Burkwood | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

 

As mentioned in my last blog I recently took delivery of the Fuji X-Pro1 to which impressed me a great deal. For me it’s not so much what the camera does (although it helps). To me it’s more about how the cameras feels and how much I enjoy using it too.

The Fuji has impressed me a great deal. In my hands it feels great, the build quality and detailing is fantastic. The controls are logically placed, it’s an absolute joy to use. In fact this camera has impressed me so much, I made the decision to switch my entire professional set up to Fuji, switching from Nikon. Now I know many fan boys will scoff and that’s fine. But at the end of the day I need to have a system I enjoy using that delivers the goods in terms of quality. For me both of those factors come hand in hand when I shoot. My Nikon kit was due for an upgrade and although it served me well, very well in fact. I felt the new offerings didn’t offer me what I wanted. As well as that it left me slightly confused as to where Nikon were heading. The Fuji system however offered me everything I was after and in a form factor that was smaller and lighter. Plus they even published a road map to show me their future plans. This alone gave me confidence it was the right choice. So this week all of my Nikon kit was sold and replaced with another Fuji X-Pro1 and an X-E1. Plus the full current lens portfolio. So now I am a full time Fuji Professional and so far loving every minute of it. As I know most people don’t read this bit I may as well shut up now and stick some pictures below.

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