Fujifilm X100S Review | Digital Photography Review | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it
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Overall Conclusion

If you've read this far, you'll know that we're very impressed with the Fujifilm X100S, not only because of the improvements that Fujifilm has made to the basic design compared to the original X100, but also in terms of how well it compares against cameras like the Sony Cyber-shot RX1/R, the Nikon Coolpix A and Ricoh GR. Although Sigma and Leica had made earlier forays into this territory, the X100 really made an impact and it's arguable that there might not even be so many compact, large-sensor fixed-lens cameras were it not for its success. The X100S can at least hold its own against the new pretenders. As expected, the good stuff about the X100 is still good in the X100S. Its 35mm equivalent F2 lens is superb, its hybrid viewfinder is supremely useful when moving between different shooting situations and lighting conditions, and features like DR expansion and in-camera Raw conversion work very well indeed. The biggest hardware upgrade in the X100S is its 16MP X-Trans sensor. To be honest, we had very few complaints about the venerable 12MP CMOS used in the X100, and although the X100S produces cleaner (and of course slightly larger) images at high ISO settings, the main reason to get excited about the new sensor is its phase-detection AF pixels. In decent light, the X100S focuses very quickly, usually very accurately, and of course manual focus gets a boost too, thanks to the Digital Split Image focus guide, which uses those same phase-detection pixels. Overall, there's a lot to like about the X100S. The only unequivocally weak area of the camera's performance is in video mode. Although it captures better footage than the X100, the X100S's lack of image stabilization, tinny microphone and tendency to generate psychedelic moiré combine to create an awkward, unfinished impression, enhanced by the fact that you have to enter the drive mode menu to even capture video in the first place. To be honest though, we'd be very surprised if anyone out there is seriously considering an X100S to shoot video. Its design philosophy, feature set and ergonomics are all aimed squarely at still photography, and as a stills camera, within the strict (and obvious) limitations of its design it succeeds brilliantly.....