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Seeking Fitz Roy amongst the clouds in El Chaltén, Patagonia | Adrian Seah

Seeking Fitz Roy amongst the clouds in El Chaltén, Patagonia | Adrian Seah | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


A fine shroud of dust hung in the air in front of me, drifting slowing to one side and catching the late morning sun in its ethereal cloud. The trees on either side of the path were absolutely still, with nary a hint of breeze in the air, which was still cool from the night. Trudging ahead on the path, not quite certain if we were headed in the right direction, I stopped to admire the view and tranquility. Surely this had to be the right path, it did fork about half an hour ago but the other path seemed so unlikely, it did not look like it had had much traffic recently, with some of the undergrowth starting to creep towards the centre of the dirt track.


We had to be on the right track.

 

With 2 hours of walking behind us, and another 2 more before we reached our goal of Laguna de los tres, at the foot of Cerro Fitz Roy. Apart from a couple of hikers heaving massive backpacks headed the other way, we had not encountered anyone else on the hike so far. They must have been returning from an overnight stay at a refugio somewhere ahead. The coolness of the air betrayed the heat that would come later on, in any case, I was not complaining, according to the park rangers, we were fantastically lucky with the weather, it could just as easily have been raining or Cerro Fitz Roy could have been blanketed with cloud, as the name Chaltén, or ‘smoking mountain’ implied. But for the moment, the skies were all clear and Fitz Roy beckoned.

 

We forged on.

 

We had started our hike from the little mountain village of El Chaltén, deep in Argentinian Patagonia and the hiking capital of Argentina. Set at the foot of both Cerro Torre and Cerro Fitz Roy, El Chaltén is a rustic base for the many hikers and climbers that come from far and wide. The final hour of the hike was by far the most challenging, with a forty-five degree climb up a dusty trail and loose stones and rocks constantly slowing our progress. It has been awhile since we last hiked and it is evident in our ever slowing pace. Hikers coming back the other way were ever encouraging. “¡Un poquito más!” (Just a little bit more!) The vista finally opened up and stole our collective breaths away. Set before the sheer granite shard of Cerro Fitz Roy, reputedly successfully climbed by only one person per year, lay the turquoise coloured glacial lake, Laguna de los tres. It seemed almost artificial in its perfection. Our tired legs were temporarily forgotten as we stood in awe, taking in the view, until we remembered that we had to make our way back the same way we came.

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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100S/T - photographer, reviews, samples and more ...  | http://www.tomen.de
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The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro 1, X-T1, X-E1/E2, X100s and X100T - photographer, reviews, samples and more.

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1 articles, reviews and X-Pro1 Photographer on the Web!





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Curated by official Fujifilm X-Photographer Thomas Menk

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Following Thomas Menk on Twitter: http://twitter.com/fuji_x_pro

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If you would like to support my work - you can do that via Flattr.

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Thomas Menk's comment, June 12, 2013 2:54 PM
Thx Peter :-)
Doug Chinnery's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:27 AM

very useful collection of information on the X Pro 1

Ariel Gonzalez's curator insight, February 21, 9:42 AM

Great stuff from an  X Photographer 

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Get Fujinon XF60mm to 1:1 magnification ratio | Ming Art

Get Fujinon XF60mm to 1:1 magnification ratio | Ming Art | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

The Fujinon XF60mm macro lens has a magnification factor of 1:2. There are various other options like the pricey Zeiss 50mm macro, which is a true 1:1 autofocus lens or vintage manual lenses like Minolta 50mm or 100mm using a converter. I just posted some few sample images here and don´t go into details, since you find a very good article at Lichtklicker. All images shot with the X-E2, Fujinon 60mm macro lens and Raynox DCR-250 using Velvia filmsimulation......

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Fujifilm X100 long exposure practice. ..... Finally | Simon Peckham

Fujifilm X100 long exposure practice. ..... Finally | Simon Peckham | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

At last …. Heading out to the Lake District taking the camper I knew I would be able to find the perfect time and location for a spot of long exposure shooting. The plan was to stick faithfully to the 1Camera1Lens project however I was not able to take the normal 35mm Fujifilm XE1 combination after finding out that the sensor in this camera was very dirty. I have never cleaned a sensor before so I ordered a lens cleaning kit and waited for delivery. Unfortunately it turned up on the day we were due to leave for Lake Holiday. I did not want to rush this procedure for fear of damaging my XE 1. I took the decision to leave the XE1 at home and take the Fujifilm X100. (My old sole mate). The 10stop Hoya filter will fit all of my lenses as I have a group of conversion rings so I can swap 39mm up to 52mm if needed. So how did it go take a look after the page break.......

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#LNDNWLK 2.0 | Rafael García Márquez

#LNDNWLK 2.0 | Rafael García Márquez | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

September 13th 2014. In the bus from Paddington to Stephen Bartels Gallery. Excited! Rebecca and Johnny Patience, Heather and Mathieu from Mirrorlessons had organized this second edition of #LNDNWLK and I couldn't resist. Had to be there. Many names and nicknames I used to relate to an avatar will be a few steps from me and they'll have actual faces from then on. That's fun. Not that I haven't done this before. I'm lucky I've met and had a great time chatting with Wouter in Amsterdam, Markus and Maria in Berlin, my dear Spanish fellows from Fujistas community, ... But this is different. A lot of old/new fellows to meet to whom I've engaged before. This is by far the best from this photowalks......

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Choosing a raw processor for Fuji X-Trans Files | Thomas Fitzgerald

Choosing a raw processor for Fuji X-Trans Files | Thomas Fitzgerald | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

I've covered post processing of Fuji X-Trans files fairly extensively over the last two years on this blog. In particular I've discussed how using a third party raw converter can give you much better results than just using Lightroom or Camera Raw. I've used and written about Photo Ninja and Iridient Developer the most, but since Phase One have released Capture One Pro 8, I've been giving that a good work out too (and I'll have a report on that in a week or two). One of the things that I've noticed though, is that usually, when you talk about one piece of software, someone will invariably tell you "how much better" the other is. There seems to be a lot of strong opinion as to which is the best. Some people swear by Photo Ninja, others swear by Capture One. In terms of pure image quality, a lot of it is quite subjective, and personally I've changed my mind over the last little while. To put it diplomatically, all three of the main third party converters have image quality that is sufficiently better than Lightroom or even Fuji's own Raw converter that picking between them comes down to your personal perceptions.....

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Fujifilm X100T Overview | Digital Photography Review

Fujifilm X100T Overview | Digital Photography Review | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

The Fujifilm FinePix X100 was a milestone camera in the industry as one of the first large sensor, prime lens cameras to achieve widespread popularity. Its classic look, obviously cribbed from a certain German camera maker, were justified by the excellent image quality its 35mm equivalent f/2 lens could produce. It was also a rare example of a camera its maker continued to develop, long after it hit the market. An original X100 running the latest firmware is a much better camera than the one that Fujifilm originally launched. Impressively, this work continued even after the second-generation, Fujifilm X100S had been launched. Fujifilm has continued this process of improvement, fine-tuning and evolution to create the X100T. From the outside it looks very much like the original model but it's packed with a host of changes, modifications and additions that promise to make it still better than what's gone before. There's a Japanese approach to continuous improvement often refered to as 'kaizen,' and it's hard not to see its application in Fujifilm's approach to its X series cameras. So, at its heart, the X100T shares its core features: the 16 megapixel CMOS sensor with X-Trans color filter array and excellent 23mm f/2 lens with its predecessor, the X100S. But almost everything beyond that has been reworked, re-assessed or refined.......

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Fuji Xt1 six months on | Nick Lukey

Fuji Xt1 six months on | Nick Lukey | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it