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Fujifilm X-Series cameras & William Eggleston et al. revisited (or - the art of composition, composition rule books & composition analysis) | Dean Johnston

Fujifilm X-Series cameras & William Eggleston et al. revisited (or - the art of composition, composition rule books & composition analysis) | Dean Johnston | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


In the comments from my previous post on the Fine Art Photographer x Fujifilm X Series Photographs, it is apparent that some people don’t care for some or all of the photographs themselves. That’s fine, for of course art is highly subjective and not all things will appeal equally to each individual viewer. I think that’s great, as it leads to an intensely wide and extremely diverse body of work, even when restricting the selection of art to the relatively narrow field of photography. At the time I was viewing the photographs in question, I did something I almost never do. Basically, I squinted with my eyes in an attempt to reduce the compositions themselves into block elements. I did this to render them devoid, as much as possible, of detailed visual information. The fine information that photographs (or any work of art) contain all help to build meaning or inform interpretation, whether this fine detail be such things as texture, small elements, smaller objects themselves, etc. My aim, while doing this, was to see the photographs as basic graphic compositions. I did this to help me understand why the photographs “worked,” because, I felt, they all in fact did work. In Japan there is an abundance of photographic publications, be they magazines, mooks (magazine books) or books. They cover absolutely every conceivable photographic related theme, including composition. Right now at my somewhat rural local Tsutaya bookstore there are two composition books available (see photos below). Typically, such books contain what I call ‘maru batsu examples.’ Maru is a Japanese term for a circle, and when used as an actual circle while marking (grading) something, means “correct.” On the other hand, batsu is an “x” mark used to indicate “incorrect” when marking. Typically, the composition books contain many pairs of similar photographs. One of each pair is (purportedly) good and indicated as such with a small maru mark, and one of each is (again, purportedly) bad and likewise indicated as such, this time with a small batsu mark (a triangle would mean half-way good or kinda okay). There is almost always accompanying text to explain or argue the point. The other important feature of these books is the visual rule section. This contains graphic examples of composition rules (with accompanying text). Boxes are used to represent photo frames, and are filled with various straight and curved lines, circles, boxes and blobs, all to show compositional elements and how they can be ideally arranged to produce (supposedly) good compositions. Let’s be clear here, this goes way beyond the usual rule of thirds or golden mean offerings, and the rules given can be bewilderingly complex and the compositional dissection quite minute. Each rule is always accompanied by example photographs to illustrate the point. Again, see the photos below........

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David Castello's comment, March 2, 2013 2:23 PM
thank you
Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100S/T - photographer, reviews, samples and more ...  | http://www.tomen.de
Curated by Thomas Menk
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The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro 1, X-T1, X-E1/E2, X100s and X100T - photographer, reviews, samples and more.

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1 articles, reviews and X-Pro1 Photographer on the Web!


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Curated by official Fujifilm X-Photographer Thomas Menk

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Following Thomas Menk on Twitter: http://twitter.com/fuji_x_pro

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Thomas Menk's insight:


If you would like to support my work - you can do that via Flattr.

Thank you :-)


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Thomas Menk's comment, June 12, 2013 2:54 PM
Thx Peter :-)
Doug Chinnery's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:27 AM

very useful collection of information on the X Pro 1

Ariel Gonzalez's curator insight, February 21, 9:42 AM

Great stuff from an  X Photographer 

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Fuji X-T1: Is it a better street camera than the X100T? | Mike Evans

Fuji X-T1: Is it a better street camera than the X100T? | Mike Evans | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Currently I'm putting Fuji's highly acclaimed X-T1 through its paces. It came with the standard 18-55 zoom but I have managed to borrow a remarkable little pancake, the 27mm f/2.8. I reckon it is just about the bee's knees when it comes to street photography. My first question, though, is how this combination compares with the lionised X100/S/T, the camera that started Fuji on to X series road in 2010. It seems incredible now that we have seen the X cameras spawn like crazy from such a simple beginning. But, more important, Fuji has launched perhaps the most comprehensive array of pro-quality lenses ever seen in such a short period. The X100 range with its 35mm-equivalent fixed focal length and ingenious hybrid viewfinder has rightly won its place high on the list of streettog desirables. This little Leica M3 lookalike is probably the most popular go-to camera for street enthusiasts......

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Fujifilm X-T1 and Olympus 60/1,5 Pen F lens | Ohm Image

Fujifilm X-T1 and Olympus 60/1,5 Pen F lens | Ohm Image | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Why it is that I've been using Olympus Pen F lenses on my wife's Fujifilm X-T1 is a subject for later: and a proper review. For now, it's enough to say I'm digging the experience. Very much. In fact, the above lens (horribly taken in the minute or so between shooting an Astell&Kern AK240 and Sony ZX1 for Mac Audio - you can even see its block -, it is a disgrace), hasn't left the camera. Neither has the slimline Kipon PEN-FX adapter.  The 60/1,5 on the APS-C X-T1 works out pretty well like a 90/2,25 on film, or FF 35mm digital. And 90mm is, and always has been, a favourite of mine. In fact, I was chatting lenses with an audiophile mate of mine. He digs lenses in the ~35mm range on APS-C, or ~50mm on FF. I told him that if I had to choose only two lenses, it would be something around 28mm - 30mm on film on the wide end, and 90mm on the long end. 

Thank you half-frame!.......

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My Photojournalism: Fuji X-T1 | Miguel A. Lopes

My Photojournalism: Fuji X-T1 | Miguel A. Lopes | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

[Google translater]


Needed a
machine to always walk with me in my day to day outside the agency, in addition to the iPhone. I've tried hundreds of "small" machines and gave me no professional feeling or image quality worthy of investing money. Recently a friend of mine passed me for the new Fuji X-T1 hand and it was love at first sight! The capabilities of small machine are impressive and the image quality it produces is very very good. I will not describe here the characteristics of it because it can see on specialty websites. I leave here some pictures I took these few days since I have....

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