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S is for Sacrebleu! | Thoughts on the X100S | Patrick La Roque

S is for Sacrebleu! | Thoughts on the X100S | Patrick La Roque | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


So I guess this is my official return to the blog folks. I hope you all enjoyed the holiday series I posted last week while I was getting everything back in order at this end of the computer screen. I case you’re wondering: the vast majority of the images in that series were shot with the 35mm on the X-Pro1. I used the X100 on a couple of occasions but the X-Pro1 kit stayed glued to my eye most of the time. This was a conscious choice. I wanted to exploit the camera’s ISO capabilities in available light while also sticking to that single 50mm focal length as much as possible. Working within boundaries. Last week of course saw the announcement of Fujifilm’s X100 successor: the X100S. As far as I’m concerned, it’s a wishlist come true. Same body, same ergonomics, same fixed 35mm focal length but… New technologies that now place it squarely at the forefront of the X Series roster. With second incarnations of both the X Trans sensor and EXR processor, this camera has just leapfrogged the X-Pro1 and X-E1. I’m not going to delve into the details because I’m sure by now most of you know all there is to know, but I will say this: the addition of phase detection to contrast detection on the AF system blew me away. I never saw that one coming, certainly not this soon. Same goes for the new split-screen focusing: most of us were expecting focus peaking but this was totally unexpected. I love that. I love companies that think outside the box and throw me for a loop. This new camera also introduces a serious change to the button layout, placing the AF selection button on the right-hand side. Can I hear a hallelujah?! This seemingly small modification is HUGE in terms of handling and something I’ve been hoping for since the very first time I used an X camera. It means we’ll be able to switch focus points with one hand, without changing our grip and finger position.

 

HUGE. In light of this, I give you the quasi-religious appeal portion of this post:

O great, kind and benevolent Gods of Fujifilm
We know phase detection is hardware-related
& perhaps focus peaking is as well (although we secretly wish to be surprised)
But could you please, in your bottomless and most infinite wisdom,
grant us the ability to swap the functions of our X-Pro/X-E1 macro and AF buttons through the all-encompassing magic of firmware?
We humbly await, basking in your eternal light.


Oh! And that minimum shutter speed setting in Auto ISO. In case you’ve forgotten.

 

Fingers crossed.....

 

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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100S/T - photographer, reviews, samples and more ...  | http://www.tomen.de
Curated by Thomas Menk
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The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro 1, X-T1, X-E1/E2, X100s and X100T - photographer, reviews, samples and more.

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1 articles, reviews and X-Pro1 Photographer on the Web!


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Curated by official Fujifilm X-Photographer Thomas Menk

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Following Thomas Menk on Twitter: http://twitter.com/fuji_x_pro

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Thomas Menk's insight:


If you would like to support my work - you can do that via Flattr.

Thank you :-)


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Thomas Menk's comment, June 12, 2013 2:54 PM
Thx Peter :-)
Doug Chinnery's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:27 AM

very useful collection of information on the X Pro 1

Ariel Gonzalez's curator insight, February 21, 9:42 AM

Great stuff from an  X Photographer 

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How to Reduce Noise with Photo Ninja | Digital Photography School

How to Reduce Noise with Photo Ninja | Digital Photography School | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Reducing noise in a digital photo is a hot topic, particularly for photographers who frequently shoot at high ISOs. Even if you’re not a typical low light shooter, the temptation may arise with some of the newer digital cameras that offer incredibly high ISO speeds which still produce pretty pleasing images, even with noise. There are many factors that can produce noise in your images, and there are many ways to reduce or sometimes even avoid noise all together. This article in particular will highlight one post-processing trick to reduce noise using a third party plugin called Photo Ninja. Made by the folks over at PictureCode, Photo Ninja is a RAW converter for both Windows and Mac OS X computers. It uses a built-in browser to open most RAW file formats, as well as JPEG and TIFF images. It also integrates well with many photo browsing and editing applications including Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom. The plugin has been around since 2003 when it was launched under the name Noise Ninja. Today, the current product has expanded and is now known as Photo Ninja,  and it offers a host of editing adjustments with its signature Noise Ninja 3.0 included........

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Street Photo of the week by Robert Doisneau | Streethunters

Street Photo of the week by Robert Doisneau | Streethunters | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Robert Doisneau is one of the most talented and amazing photographers that has ever lived. Period. He was an active Street Photographer for more than 60 years, more than most others and his work depicts the evolution of the modern world from the early 1930s all the way up until the end of the 20th century, in the mid 1990s. His photographs of France are iconic, they are epic. You have certainly seen one or more of them in your lifetime even if you don’t know that he was the photographer that made the shot. He was creative, innovative, funny, brave and daring. He would take the photo of a funny situation just as passionately as he would photograph the fighters of the French resistance in the barricades during WWII. He would capture the magic, playful moments of children, just as well as the sensational look of a beautiful woman. He would be there to snap the moment, to forever record scenes that are now part of European Modern History......

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REVIEW: The New XF50-140mm f2.8 - First Impressions | Jeff Carter

REVIEW: The New XF50-140mm f2.8 - First Impressions | Jeff Carter | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Last weekend at the Fuji International Speedway, where I was working on the Japanese round of the FIA World Endurance Championship, I had the opportunity to see the new Fujinon  XF50-140mmF2.8 R LM OIS WR lens ahead of its release in the UK this November.  My thanks to the guys from Fujifilm Japan, who brought one along to the race. Because it was race day I was unable to go out and shoot with the lens, hopefully I will be able to remedy this later this year, but here are my first impressions of this new fast telephoto lens. During my 18 years shooting with Nikon, my favourite lens was the Nikkor 80-200mm f2.8 AF-D that I bought new in 1996. I kept this lens for the entire time I used Nikon both as an enthusiast and professional photographer and I sold it, reluctantly, in May of this year. It is probably the one lens that I miss the most,  so when Fujifilm announced a constant f2.8 mid range zoom (76mm-213mm equivalent) I was eager to get my hands on a copy to see what it is like......

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Fuji XF 14mm lens review | Mark Richards

Fuji XF 14mm lens review | Mark Richards | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

There is something that new users need to know about the Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 lens –  as the X series are not full-frame cameras then the lens is really equivalent to a 21mm lens when it comes to the field of view and should be considered with this in mind.  This is not like the Voigtländer 15mm lens in terms of its field of view so it is important you manage your expectations.  It remains however an ultra-wide angle lens by any standards and gives a pretty extreme angle of view at 89º.  The lens I am using as a benchmark for this review is the Zeiss Biogon T* 2.8/21 for the Contax G2 as that was my stock 21mm lens for years and is outstanding quality. One of the first photographs I took with the Fuji 14mm lens is the one of Tower Bridge (above) which was taken with the Fujifilm X-Pro1 camera.  Click on the images to enlarge (but please remember the sample images are copyright and shouldn’t be used without my permission) ......