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Breaking the Rules | Thomas Park on Digital Photography Review

Breaking the Rules | Thomas Park on Digital Photography Review | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

 

There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs - Ansel Adams

 

In a previous article, I discussed several so-called 'rules of composition'. Compositional rules, however, can be polarizing and divisive. Is this because as artists, we prize independence and don't like to, 'color in between the lines'? Or is it because we've all experienced disappointment when slavish application of the Golden Ratio still produces drab and lifeless images? Certainly, great works of art have been produced throughout history that paid no heed to pre-determined compositional rules. You may ask then, if compelling art is not created by simply following rules, what's the point of learning the rules in the first place? That's a great question.

Now this is not going to be an article suggesting that all compositional rules are 'bad' or 'wrong'. Instead, what follows is a look at the rationale behind some established compositional rules. I'd argue that by understanding the intent behind a rule, we can subvert or break the rule to create drama or focus the viewer's attention in creative and novel ways. Let's begin with an example from another visual medium: drawing. 


A story about eyes

Many years ago, my great-uncle - an accomplished painter and sculptor - was teaching me how to draw portraits. He suggested placing the eyes at the vertical midway point of the head. This 'rule' won't be surprising for anyone with a drawing background, but for many people, the idea that the eyes are halfway down the face is unintuitive - it seems too low! I recently had a conversation with a friend who received the same advice from his father, despite the fact that he and I grew up in different countries. The fact that two artists from opposite sides of the planet were taught the same 'rule of eyes' points to one source of artistic rules: observations about the natural world. In reality, are everybody's eyes exactly halfway down their face? No, but it's a good starting point that is visually pleasing and conforms to our expectations of illustrated portraits. In fact, a distinguishing feature of children's drawings of people is that the eyes are placed 'too high up' on the face. This is a simple rule that helps us to draw a more realistic portrait. Just as importantly, however, understanding this rule allows us to make deliberate choices. We can draw a face with the eyes in the middle of the face for a natural look. We can instead place the eyes above the midway mark to give the drawing a more child-like quality. Or we can place the eyes below the midway mark to make the drawing look furtive or comical.

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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100s - photographer, reviews, samples and more ... | http://www.tomen.de
Curated by Thomas Menk
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The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro 1, X-T1, X-E1/E2, X100s and X100T - photographer, reviews, samples and more.

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1 articles, reviews and X-Pro1 Photographer on the Web!





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Curated by official Fujifilm X-Photographer Thomas Menk

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Following Thomas Menk on Twitter: http://twitter.com/fuji_x_pro

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If you would like to support my work - you can do that via Flattr.

Thank you :-)


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Thomas Menk's comment, June 12, 2013 2:54 PM
Thx Peter :-)
Doug Chinnery's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:27 AM

very useful collection of information on the X Pro 1

Ariel Gonzalez's curator insight, February 21, 9:42 AM

Great stuff from an  X Photographer 

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Fujifilm at Photokina 2014! | Marc Horner

Fujifilm at Photokina 2014! | Marc Horner | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Last week we were at photokina, the world’s largest imaging fair, from Tuesday 16th to Sunday 21st September. It’s been a complete blast and this post will hopefully highlight the bits you missed if you couldn’t make it to Cologne this year. Our booth was big. It was made up with lots of different sections covering many different areas of our business, all with the same common goal – helping people with photography. Some were printed on FUJIFLEX Crystal Archive Printing Material and others on Fujicolor Crystal Archive Digital Paper but they were all amazingly good to look at. We’ve combined our X series cameras with many years’ experience of printing and finally the creativity of real users of our cameras to create a truly awe inspiring array of beautiful prints. Many visitors to the stand told us that they thought these were the best prints on display at the show.........

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WCL-X100 & TCL-X100 for Fujifilm X100 and X100S & X100T | Derek Clark

WCL-X100 & TCL-X100 for Fujifilm X100 and X100S & X100T | Derek Clark | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

The Fujifilm X100 was a real game changer in my photography. I was in need of something small, light and above all else, great in low light. But I got more than I bargained for and the X100 took me on a journey and made me realize the direction I really wanted to go. I still have my original X100, but after including many other X cameras to my kit, I’ve recently came full circle and rekindled my love of the X100 with the addition of an X100S. Although I have five X series cameras and many lenses, I have had an urge lately to carry less….much less. So I’ve limited my personal photography to the X100S (although not exclusively). But although I love the 35mm field of view (full frame wise), Sometimes I can be restricted in zooming with my feet and then have to take another body and lens(s).....

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Tokyo: Then and Now, Film vs Fuji x100s | Thomas Alan

Tokyo: Then and Now, Film vs Fuji x100s | Thomas Alan | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

In the summer of 1982 I was stationed in Okinawa, Japan, as a U.S. Marine. My unit trained in mainland a couple times per year, giving me the opportunity to visit Tokyo. It was this point in my life that I discovered photography, and purchased my first 35mm SLR camera, a Yashica if I remember right. The city was a never ending playground for photography, and I went through many rolls of film, learning to use my new toy. Looking back now I wish that I had taken more photos........

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Review: Fujifilm XF56mmF1.2 R Lens | Krista Michaels

Review: Fujifilm XF56mmF1.2 R Lens | Krista Michaels | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Conclusion:


At the end of this quick photo shoot, I knew that Canon was a thing of the past in my life. Fujifilm has won my heart with the X-T1 mirrorless camera body and their superb XF56mmF1.2 R lens. I honestly, at this point, cannot see myself ever going back to a bulky DSLR. I just have no interest any longer, as I’m getting mind-blowing images with my Fuji, and it has, without question, reignited a major passion for the purity of photography that I haven’t felt since I first picked up a camera. I love the X-T1… and I LOVE this lens! Highly recommended! =)

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Street Photography: 5 Dinge, die ich von William Eggleston gelernt habe | Feyzi Demirel

Street Photography: 5 Dinge, die ich von William Eggleston gelernt habe | Feyzi Demirel | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Ich versuche mich fortlaufend fotografisch weiterzuentwickeln, und auf diesem Weg bin ich eigentlich ständig auf der Suche nach Inspiration. Eine solche Inspiration habe ich vor einigen Monaten erhalten, als ich zufällig auf einen Dokumentarfilm über den Fotografen William Eggleston gestoßen bin. Schande über mein Haupt, ich kannte ihn bis dato nicht, aber der Film hat mich sehr neugierig gemacht und ich habe mich weiter mit seiner Arbeit beschäftigt. Ich kann vorwegnehmen, dass die Arbeit von Eggleston einige meiner bisherigen fotografischen Denkmuster, insbesondere in Bezug auf Street Photography, geändert hat. Die Einflüsse Egglestons auf mich habe ich unten in 5 Punkten zusammengefasst.......

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X100s in Paris | Greg Vorobiov

X100s in Paris | Greg Vorobiov | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Here's the second set of images that I shot with my X100s while in Paris. The first set of images were shot in Italy which can be seen in this post: http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/54391556 Thanks for looking.....