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First date with the Fuji X-Pro1 | Pete Bridgwood

First date with the Fuji X-Pro1 | Pete Bridgwood | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


My first serious camera was a Russian made Zenith EM in the late 1970′s. It was a joy to use, completely manual in operation, delightfully tactile and it did what it said on the tin. Now, over 30 years later, using high-end Fuji Compact System Cameras (CSCs) has re-ignited a passion. Over the last 2 years, when not shooting fine-art landscapes I’ve enjoyed the occasional dalliance with street photography using the Fuji X100. This is a wonderful camera to use, a superb ‘carry around’, and the fixed focal length lens is ideally suited to street photography. Far from feeling restricted by having a fixed focal length lens, it is unexpectedly liberating to be forced into using a set focal length. For an old-hand like me who spent years wet-processing and working exclusively in black & white, the X100 is an epiphany. How refreshing to use a camera with manual selection of shutter speed and aperture using traditional dials, rather than having to suffer the modern distraction of interfacing with electronics. Of course, under the bonnet, there are all the advantages of modern electronics and digital alchemy; it’s just nicely hidden for most of the time. Couple this fantastic experience of image gathering with state of the art creative black & white processing algorithms found in Nik’s Silver Efex Pro, and you have a winner. Miles of enjoyment walking the streets, black & white creative heaven. Despite the life-changing qualities of the X100 for street-photography (it’s quite possibly still the finest street-photography camera available bar none), for other genres there are obvious advantages in having interchangeable lenses. When I first held a Fuji X-Pro1 I was smitten. This was a camera that surpassed the already amazing X100 in specification, with the important addition of interchangeable lenses. The X-Pro1 has an improved APS-C sized X-Trans sensor that mimics the structure of silver halide film and lacks an anti-alias filter to provide the sharpest possible results. Fuji have kept the hybrid viewfinder that allows switching between the more traditional optical or electronic function, similar to that found on the X100....

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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100S/T - photographer, reviews, samples and more ...  | http://www.tomen.de
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The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro 1, X-T1, X-E1/E2, X100s and X100T - photographer, reviews, samples and more.

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1 articles, reviews and X-Pro1 Photographer on the Web!


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Curated by official Fujifilm X-Photographer Thomas Menk

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Thomas Menk's comment, June 12, 2013 2:54 PM
Thx Peter :-)
Doug Chinnery's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:27 AM

very useful collection of information on the X Pro 1

Ariel Gonzalez's curator insight, February 21, 9:42 AM

Great stuff from an  X Photographer 

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The Fuji X-T1 on African Safari - How Well Did It Work? | Dave Burns

The Fuji X-T1 on African Safari - How Well Did It Work? | Dave Burns | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

In a recent post, I described the kit I took on the most recent photo tour I led to Africa. The kit included the Fuji X-T1 and in this post, I’m going to talk about my impressions of using that X-T1 in the field, how well it performed, and whether I would bring it again. At the end is a gallery of images I made with the X-T1. When I told some people I was bringing the X-T1 on safari, they shook their heads. While people love their X-T1’s, there’s general consensus that it’s not suitable for sports or wildlife photography – anything with fast action. And for those who follow online forums and Facebook groups and are familiar with the challenges many people face with the X-T1, much of this article will be predictable. That’s probably a good thing: ultimately I just want my systems to be better and if Fuji is already aware of their gear’s good and bad points, that increases the likelihood that they’re already working on improving them. And that’s a good thing because I’m biased: I want this gear to work well since it has many great points and ultimately my goal is to change my kit to use gear that is lighter and smaller than my current gear. My standard safari kit for several years has included the Canon 5D Mark III and that is my benchmark for the X-T1. I may not need the X-T1 to measure up to the 5D3 in all areas but there are a few areas of functionality that are critical to successful shooting on safari.......

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How to Use LAB Color in Photoshop to Add Punch to Your Images | Jim Hamel

How to Use LAB Color in Photoshop to Add Punch to Your Images | Jim Hamel | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Have you ever wished you could stretch out the color palette of your picture? Or that you could separate colors that looked too flat or close together? Well, with Photoshop, you can – by converting your picture to something called LAB colorspace and adjusting the color there. That might sound complicated, but it is actually pretty simple. If you have ever made a levels or curves adjustment, you already know everything you need to know to accomplish this. In this article, you will learn two things. First, you will learn the five simple steps to achieve color separation using the LAB color move. You can follow these steps without even understanding how any of this works and it will work just fine for you. Second, after walking you through the steps, you will see how this move works. That way, if you want to apply this move to your photos in a more nuanced fashion later it will help you to do so......