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Fujinon XF 35mm f/1.4 R Fuji X Pro 1 Super EBC | ERPhotoReview

Fujinon XF 35mm f/1.4 R Fuji X Pro 1 Super EBC | ERPhotoReview | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


This lens has quickly reached cult status, does this standard live up to the hype? This lens is a beautifully built standard, constructed entirely of metal. At least anything you touch, including the filter threads, which is a nice departure from the standard plastic these days. The aperture ring is reminiscent of older lenses with nice metal knurls and nice positive 1/3 stop click stops. The focus ring is similar quality, also with all metal knurled grip. The hood is nice and positive and the lens has two caps. One that goes on the hood since it is not a reversible style, and a second that goes on the filter thread. Thankfully the cap on the threads can still be removed with the hood in place. The hood has a nice positive bayonet mount which makes it easy to take on and off even with the lens cap on. The lens is a modern design 8 element lens with 1 aspherical element, and a nice 7 curved bladed diaphragm, which remains fairly circular until about f/2.8 or f/4. By f/5.6 it is mostly polygon. The 52 mm filter threads are standard for many large aperture standard lenses, so filters are easy to find. The lens has a typical minimum focus distance of about 0.3 m and a maximum magnification of 0.17x. It is well weighted at about 187 g, feeling not too heavy nor too light. This lens is nearly the same size as a classic 50 mm f/1.4 lens from the film camera era. In use, the AF motor is a stepper motor style, and it does make audible focus noise, on par with a quieter screw drive system. Focus remains quick if the lens doesn’t have to hunt the range, but if it does it takes just over a second to go full range. The lens seems to have a long throw, so it should be very precise, but take a little longer to go end to end. In normal circumstances the lens will focus in just a fraction of a second. The manual focus ring is slightly slippery due to the metal knurls. I think rubber would provide a better grip, but wouldn’t last as long or feel as high quality. If you are used to doing quick back and forth motions to manually focus, and stopping on the sharpest point in an instant, this lens won’t work great for that. You have to slow it down as it takes a fraction of a second for the motor to respond. The best way to manually focus is to prefocus using the AE-L/AF-L button and tweak manually, but turning quickly back and forth will work if you slow it down just a bit to compensate for the “lag”. Now how about the optics in a 35 mm f/1.4? The only other standard class f/1.4 lens designed for APS-C at this time is the Sigma 30mm f/1.4, which is notoriously bad in the corners. Does this slightly longer standard lens do better?

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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100S/T - photographer, reviews, samples and more ...  | http://www.tomen.de
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The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro 1, X-T1, X-E1/E2, X100s and X100T - photographer, reviews, samples and more.

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1 articles, reviews and X-Pro1 Photographer on the Web!


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Curated by official Fujifilm X-Photographer Thomas Menk

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Thomas Menk's comment, June 12, 2013 2:54 PM
Thx Peter :-)
Doug Chinnery's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:27 AM

very useful collection of information on the X Pro 1

Ariel Gonzalez's curator insight, February 21, 9:42 AM

Great stuff from an  X Photographer 

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REVIEW: Fujinon XF60mm f2.4 v Fujinon XF56mm f1.2 | Jeff Carter

REVIEW: Fujinon XF60mm f2.4 v Fujinon XF56mm f1.2 | Jeff Carter | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Last month I added the superb Fujinon XF56mm f1.2R lens to my camera bag, which is the seventh Fujinon lens I have bought for my X-Series kit. It is also the third lens that covers the short telephoto range, the others being the XF55-200mm f3.5/4.8 zoom and the XF60mm f2.4R macro. This had me wondering if I could sell off one of the lenses or did each lens offer something that meant I could justify hanging on to all three? Well for starters we can ignore the 55-200mm zoom as this lens offers the long telephoto reach I need for my landscapes and wildlife. It is an excellent all round zoom lens that has a place in my camera bag. So that leaves the two prime lenses.......

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Always look on the “wide” side of life – The Fujifilm XF 10-24mm f/4 Review | MirrorLessons

Always look on the “wide” side of life – The Fujifilm XF 10-24mm f/4 Review | MirrorLessons | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

I couldn’t recommend the 10-24mm more highly to Fujifilm users who appreciate a versatile wide-angle lens for landscapes, architecture and other genres. While certainly bigger and slower than the XF 14mm f/2.8, it is far more versatile and allows for further creativity. The image quality is also nothing short of impressive. The 10-24mm is perfect for many genres, and could easily become a lens that you keep mounted on your camera for various situations, while with the 14mm, I would inevitably feel the need to switch to a longer focal length on certain occasions.......

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THIS CITY on Exposure | Jonathan Wilson

THIS CITY on Exposure | Jonathan Wilson | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it
I haven’t put very large dent in my travel bucket list, but Havana, Cuba was most definitely on it. Living in Miami for the last 8 years, I went in with expectations in my head, most of which didn’t align with what I experienced in my short stay.Finally after a few false alarms myself, Dillon Hearns, Conall Keenan, John Mahoney and Matt Sosna joined a group from Amigo Skate. We loaded up our bikes, snorks and heavy bags of parts to help keep BMX and skateboarding alive in Cuba. All of the travel details of how this trip came to be are confusing and long winded. Travel to Cuba is somehow simple and complicated. Weight limits on all luggage. Exchanging money - US Dollars -> Euro -> Cuban Convertible Currency (CUC) to avoid the additional taxes. Having no phones once there. Questions from the TSA, German Shepherds before getting on the plane…The hours before takeoff were intense, I didn't really believe I was going to Cuba directly from Miami until the plane was in the air.Somehow a 30 minute flight became spending half the day in both MIA and HAV airports. Finally we made through the excruciating moments of waiting for our bikes and the damage they may have incurred. Finally we made it to the exterior of José Martí International Airport, I was hit with what I could only described and some kind of sensory overload. Typically when I land at an airport I scatter to a tram or my motorcycle and I’m off. In Havana we were greeted by a few hundred locals, taxi drivers and assorted characters. It was surreal.
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