Fuji X-Pro1
Follow
Find
4.0M views | +3.6K today
 
Scooped by Thomas Menk
onto Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Fujinon XF 35mm f/1.4 R Fuji X Pro 1 Super EBC | ERPhotoReview

Fujinon XF 35mm f/1.4 R Fuji X Pro 1 Super EBC | ERPhotoReview | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


This lens has quickly reached cult status, does this standard live up to the hype? This lens is a beautifully built standard, constructed entirely of metal. At least anything you touch, including the filter threads, which is a nice departure from the standard plastic these days. The aperture ring is reminiscent of older lenses with nice metal knurls and nice positive 1/3 stop click stops. The focus ring is similar quality, also with all metal knurled grip. The hood is nice and positive and the lens has two caps. One that goes on the hood since it is not a reversible style, and a second that goes on the filter thread. Thankfully the cap on the threads can still be removed with the hood in place. The hood has a nice positive bayonet mount which makes it easy to take on and off even with the lens cap on. The lens is a modern design 8 element lens with 1 aspherical element, and a nice 7 curved bladed diaphragm, which remains fairly circular until about f/2.8 or f/4. By f/5.6 it is mostly polygon. The 52 mm filter threads are standard for many large aperture standard lenses, so filters are easy to find. The lens has a typical minimum focus distance of about 0.3 m and a maximum magnification of 0.17x. It is well weighted at about 187 g, feeling not too heavy nor too light. This lens is nearly the same size as a classic 50 mm f/1.4 lens from the film camera era. In use, the AF motor is a stepper motor style, and it does make audible focus noise, on par with a quieter screw drive system. Focus remains quick if the lens doesn’t have to hunt the range, but if it does it takes just over a second to go full range. The lens seems to have a long throw, so it should be very precise, but take a little longer to go end to end. In normal circumstances the lens will focus in just a fraction of a second. The manual focus ring is slightly slippery due to the metal knurls. I think rubber would provide a better grip, but wouldn’t last as long or feel as high quality. If you are used to doing quick back and forth motions to manually focus, and stopping on the sharpest point in an instant, this lens won’t work great for that. You have to slow it down as it takes a fraction of a second for the motor to respond. The best way to manually focus is to prefocus using the AE-L/AF-L button and tweak manually, but turning quickly back and forth will work if you slow it down just a bit to compensate for the “lag”. Now how about the optics in a 35 mm f/1.4? The only other standard class f/1.4 lens designed for APS-C at this time is the Sigma 30mm f/1.4, which is notoriously bad in the corners. Does this slightly longer standard lens do better?

more...
No comment yet.
Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100s - photographer, reviews, samples and more ... | http://www.tomen.de
Curated by Thomas Menk
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1/X-Pro2, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1/X-Pro2, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro 1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100s - photographer, reviews, samples and more.

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1 articles, reviews and X-Pro1 Photographer on the Web!





________________________________________________________________________

Curated by official Fujifilm X-Photographer Thomas Menk

________________________________________________________________________


Following Thomas Menk on Twitter: http://twitter.com/fuji_x_pro

Thomas Menk's insight:


If you would like to support my work - you can do that via Flattr.

Thank you :-)


more...
Thomas Menk's comment, June 12, 2013 11:54 AM
Thx Peter :-)
Doug Chinnery's curator insight, October 17, 2013 7:27 AM

very useful collection of information on the X Pro 1

Ariel Gonzalez's curator insight, February 21, 6:42 AM

Great stuff from an  X Photographer 

Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

I fell in love with my X | Elke Vogelsang

I fell in love with my X | Elke Vogelsang | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

If you want to bore the hell out of me, talk to me about gear. I’m definitely not a camera geek. There are a lot of people who spent a lot of time comparing specifications, reading camera reviews, zooming in to the pixel. Lots of people spend more time on the gear than on taking pictures. Call me old-fashioned or mad, but when I bought my camera with lenses, I went up to my local retailer, told him what I need the camera for and that I would like to have the best I could possibly afford. I got a Canon 7D with three brilliant lenses. When I decided to become a wedding photographer, I updated the camera to a 5D, but I never regretted handling it this way. No tedious study of camera reviews, etc. Less lifetime wasted. I always have a camera with me. Since I was tired of carrying the heavy dslr equipment with me I decided that I need to get a more lightweight and smaller camera for my private pictures. I went for a Fujifilm X-20. It is beautiful. I just love the retro design of the Fujifilm X series. Yes, I am a visual person. But don’t blame a photographer for loving beauty. The headings of the camera reviews about the X series and the X-20 were promising (sorry, I usually don’t get any further than this). Of course, the X-20 is not a full substitution for my dslr, but I wanted to get something lightweight and small for a price I could afford. After all, it is pure luxury to get a new camera when you already got quite amazing equipment. So on my first holidays after I bought the X-20 I left my dslr at home and couldn’t have been happier. No bulky bag with heavy camera body and lenses hurting my back.......

more...
Benkirane Nabil's comment, Today, 1:42 PM
beautiful
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Glasgow Commonwealth Games 2014 & Testing New Fuji Glass | 35mmstreet

Glasgow Commonwealth Games 2014 & Testing New Fuji Glass | 35mmstreet | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

I’ve had the pleasure of trying out some great new Fujifilm X Series Lenses that they sent to me recently and thought I’d post some street shots here before I review them over at my DCP Blog. The lenses are the tiny 27mm f2.8 Pancake, The super wide 10-24mm f4 and two converter lenses for my favourite street cameras the x100 & X100s. these two screw on lenses take the standard 35mm (full frame equivalent) lens down to 28mm or up to a 50mm. 28mm, 35mm &50mm are all great street photography focal lengths, so there’s pretty much something for every street photographer wishing to use the X100 or X100S. Reviews for each lens coming soon......

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Fuji X100S Review | StreetPXL

Fuji X100S Review | StreetPXL | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

The X100 was Fuji’s first attempt at a large sensor, compact, mirrorless camera. Despite rave reviews, the X100 had a list of quirks that made it difficult to wield. Among them, slow autofocus and a poorly designed manual focus system. Fuji listened to feedback from its dedicated following and released the X100S. Better. Faster. Stronger. The Fuji X100S is the ultimate digital street photography camera. It has it all: outstanding build and image quality, usable features, and great controls…all wrapped up in a sexy compact body. There are some big name photographers singing the praises of the X100S as well. In a very candid review, Zack Arias wrote, “Fuji is the new Leica.” In a follow-up review, he addressed the flak he received: I stepped on some toes when I claimed that Fuji is the new Leica…I’ve had a Fuji in one hand and a Leica in another. Hand on my heart…I’d chose the Fuji.........

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Photography of Marathon watches. Fuji | Simon Peckham

Photography of Marathon watches. Fuji |  Simon Peckham | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

I have been after one of these Marathon watches for some time now and by chance a sterile version turned up on EBay. Having done my research I have a good idea of my maximum bid. Needles to say I am now the owner of a very fine, extremely well built and trusted timepiece. I have taken a few photographs and post processed them in black and white HDR. The marathon watch company have been making time pieces in Switzerland since 1939. They now provide quality watches to government and military to an ISO 6425 specification. This is a dive search and rescue version made from high quality 316L stainless steel. Full size screw down crown. Water resistant to 300m/1000ft (not that I would ever need to swim that deep) 2.3mm thick sapphire crystal glass, 120 position bezel and tritium tube luminous hour and hand marking for superb night time display.........


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Fuji XF 10-24MM f4: Shooting Architecture | Marco Sobrevinas

Fuji XF 10-24MM f4: Shooting Architecture | Marco Sobrevinas | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Fuji’s X series lens lineup (including Zeiss’s three X mount lenses) is one of the primary reasons the system has been so well received by both professionals and informed enthusiasts.  Even their first-generation line-up of primes performs very well, especially with all of the firmware updates. Like Patrick, I’ve been a decades-long, Leica M user (almost 30 years) and have a penchant for primes rather than zooms.  Working professionally for 26 of those years, however, meant that I used my fair share of zooms as well.  So while I have a sentimental attachment to the rangefinder film camera and prime lenses, when I’m working for pay, I won’t hesitate to use any tool (digital, zooms, post-processing software) to improve my efficiency and the quality of the images I’m providing to a client.........

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Fujifilm XF 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR Lens Review | Michael R. Cruz

Fujifilm XF 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR Lens Review | Michael R. Cruz | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

This is Fuji’s first weather sealed lens.  It is not the fast lens by any means, widest at f 3.5 up to f 5.6; but the focal length makes it a great travel lens.  This 7.5x super-zoom lens is equivalent to 27-206mm on a full-frame camera (35mm) it also comes with Optical Image Stabilization. If you are familiar with the 18-55mm lens or any Fujinon XF lenses you will have the same feel right at home with the XF 18-135mm.  The build quality of the lens is top notch and with a reasonable price tag it is a very attractive lens.  The mount like with any Fujinon XF lenses is metal and looks like it will last for a long time.  The Zoom ring has enough torque and smoothness combination to it.  I have no issues going back and forth for a different zoom range.  There’s also a knob to turn the OIS (Optical Image Stabilizer) on or off and a button for manual or Automatic Aperture control.  It also comes with a lens hood and a soft cloth pouch.......

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Book Review – Visual Flow: Mastering the Art of Composition | Ian Plant

Book Review – Visual Flow: Mastering the Art of Composition | Ian Plant | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Ian Plant’s book Visual Flow: Mastering the Art of Composition belongs on the digital bookshelf of every serious photographer. It is a hugely informative, well-analyzed and finely crafted work on a truly important aspect of creative photography (or other visual art): composition. Visual Flow is a thinking person’s approach to composition (which is the only way to truly create images, rather than “capturing” them), and the thoughtful explanations honestly provide a deeper level to the reader’s understanding of composition. Since that is really the point of buying a book on composition, I will say this up front: you can learn about creating art by reading this book. This book is an in-depth work, with a lot of thought put into defining the whys behind the “rules”. Visual Flow also includes plenty of healthy explanations of the whys behind breaking the “rules”. It is so popular, in some circles, to pay lip service to being a “rule-breaker”. To read some forums, it seems nearly mandatory to discuss the importance of rule-breaking. So much so that people have a tendency to boast about the rules that they are breaking almost before they even learn what the rules are........