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Maximum detail RAW processing. DCRAW - Fuji X-Pro1 & XE-1 | Terrance Lam

Maximum detail RAW processing. DCRAW - Fuji X-Pro1 & XE-1 | Terrance Lam | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

 

So after playing with this for weeks, I believe this is probably the maximum that we can get out of the Fuji RAF files until the other developers come up with better understanding of the unique X-Trans CMOS sensor. Now this is still not the most ideal workflow for most people. Pixel Peeping aside, the Fuji X files are fantastic, even in Adobe Lightroom. My goal in this was to get a better understanding of what is going on. I wish I knew how to program, because I'd love to create a simpler way to do this. If there's anyone out there that is interested in taking what I've done and turning into a nice little drag and drop application, I think you'd get a lot of fans.


The Process
1. Using command line DCRAW: dcraw -a -H 0 -o 4 -q 2 -f -m 15 -g 2.4 12.9 -6 -T
2. Convert TIFF file to LAB file in Photoshop
3. Resize image 200% with Bicubic Smoother
4, Select Lightness Channel under channel panel.
5. Select Median filter under Noise in Filter. Select 1 pixel
6. Resize image 50% with Bicubic Sharper (Nearest Neighbour is actually a more subtle effect which I kind of prefer)
7. Save.

SilkyPix and RPP both process very similar files and although I know for certain that RPP uses DCRAW, SilkyPix I believe is a proprietary RAW engine. What I do speculate is the chroma smearing is a result of interpolation errors. Much of it can be suppressed with chroma noise reduction without loss of image quality. However one of the big nagging issues was this 'zipper' aliasing that was happening. After analyzing the files, it seems specifically the red sub-pixels are causing much of this zipper effect, but also part of the interpolation issues. I was able to get rid of a good portion of the chroma smearing by doing 3x3 multi-pass median filtering through DCRAW.....

 

Full article on following Website:
http://frontallobbings.blogspot.de/2012/11/super-detail-with-fujifilm-x-pro1-raf.html

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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100S/T - photographer, reviews, samples and more ...  | http://www.tomen.de
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The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro 1, X-T1, X-E1/E2, X100s and X100T - photographer, reviews, samples and more.

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1 articles, reviews and X-Pro1 Photographer on the Web!


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Curated by official Fujifilm X-Photographer Thomas Menk

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Thomas Menk's comment, June 12, 2013 2:54 PM
Thx Peter :-)
Doug Chinnery's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:27 AM

very useful collection of information on the X Pro 1

Ariel Gonzalez's curator insight, February 21, 9:42 AM

Great stuff from an  X Photographer 

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Sensor Crop Factors and Equivalence | Nasim Mansurov

Sensor Crop Factors and Equivalence | Nasim Mansurov | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

The subject of sensor crop factors and equivalence has become rather controversial between photographers, sparking heated debates on photography sites and forums. So much has been posted on this topic, that it almost feels redundant to write about it again. Sadly, with all the great and not-so-great information out there on equivalence, many photographers are only left more puzzled and confused. Thanks to so many different formats available today, including 1″/CX, Micro Four Thirds, APS-C, 35mm/Full Frame, Medium Format (in different sizes), photographers are comparing these systems by calculating their equivalent focal lengths, apertures, depth of field, camera to subject distances, hyperfocal distances and other technical jargon, to prove the inferiority or the superiority of one system over another. In this article, I want to bring up some of these points and express my subjective opinion on the matter. Recognizing that this topic is one of the never-ending debates with strong arguments from all sides, I do realize that some of our readers may disagree with my statements and arguments. So if you do disagree with what I say, please provide your opinion in a civilized manner in the comments section below. Before we get started, let’s first go over some of the history of sensor formats to get a better understanding of the past events and to be able to digest the material that will follow more easily......

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