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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100s - photographer, reviews, samples and more ... | http://www.tomen.de
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BACK WHERE I BEGAN - Beijing, China Travel Blog | Spencer Wynn

BACK WHERE I BEGAN - Beijing, China Travel Blog | Spencer Wynn | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

I am back in Beijing. It is funny how comforting it is to be back in this massively overcrowded city with its choking traffic, near lethal pedestrian crossings and aloof hospitality industry! It has been just about 5 weeks of traveling to very remote places, meeting the warmest people ever and living in all manner of lodgings. but coming back to Beijing is something familiar and something predictable. The past few days been spent on a train. 33 hours from Xiamen in south China on the sea. The "soft sleeper" is a small cubical about 7 feet wide, and tall enough for two bunks arranged on each side. The lower bunks cost a little more and have a tray-sized shared table between them under the window. The upper bunks have no such furnishings, but do have two folding seats out in the common hallway looking out the window on the other side of the train, also a big bonus... an electrical outlet! Small pleasures! ......

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China - Not Black & White | Sven Schroeter

China - Not Black & White | Sven Schroeter | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Another trip, another opportunity. Rumour had it that the backstreets of China are not safe, and when I questioned why and what made them so, I received no real answer, just hearsay. So I figured with nothing to lose, expect for maybe a camera and lens, I had the perfect adventure planned. You may remember the last trip I took to Asia's streets, where the resulting images were far too reserved and not true to my intimate style. So amped up on oolong tea, and camera in hand, I was ready to step into the ring for round two. It can be tricky communicating why you want to make a strangers street portrait, even when you speak the language, but when all you have is an award winning smile and sign language there are many shots which unfortunately will slip away. Although on the street I was warmly welcomed by those wanting to practice their English, as soon as the camera came out they were singing a very different tune. Thankfully, I could not understand the angry yells and possible cussing which followed me down the street when I just went for it, but that is not to say that everyone was adverse to the idea. Some welcomed the camera and had a good giggle while I taught them posing 101 and performed my dance......



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Mongolia | Timo Soasepp

Mongolia | Timo Soasepp | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


If I had to condense my experiences in Mongolia to a few words, I’d use unpredictable, disorganised, traditional and full of potential. Urban planning within the capital of Ulan Bator is almost non existent, and all the traffic is packed to a few main roads with no agreed upon road laws. The capital is also a real hotpot of different cultures. You can see the western influences in the architecture and imported automobiles, but then around the corner you can bump into a gentleman decked out in full national dress. The national costumes are incredibly colourful and still used in every day wear, and I haven’t been able but to admire their beautiful craftsmanship and detail. To quote a gentleman called Woody whom I met at our hostel, you can find silk here, even finer than in China. Straying out of the capital area, the traditional influences are even more at show. We visited a family in the country, and it was like travelling 20 years back in time. No running water, the heating by coal, an outhouse and interior decor that probably hadn’t changed for years, but man did I love this experience! I witnessed a real piece of life in Mongolia. One of the biggest reasons why I wanted to visit Mongolia was for its nature. This dream also proved to be our downfall. When we visited the village I described before, our plan was to head out from there to the national park of Gorkhi Terelji come next morning. But during the night, we started experiencing heavy snowfall, almost 5cm in one night and biting cold winds. The roads quickly iced up and no one had changed for their winter tires yet. Foolishly, we didn’t let this change our plans and we headed out for the road. Once we had driven out the village, we experienced the last thing you want to experience in a car. A crash. We collided with a car in front of us and that was it for that trip. I sustained a hairline crack in the neck and missed out on a visit to the national park but at least I’m still here. Two working arms and legs. A few days rest and we’ll continue our journey with a neck brace! Because our trip to the national park was a bust, I’m expecting to make up for it with some other adventures.......

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China: Travel and Camera Recommendations | roel.me

China: Travel and Camera Recommendations | roel.me | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

When you visit China, be prepared to be overwhelmed as it is a huge country with literally thousands of things to see and photograph. Given that I am photographer, I felt like a child in a candy shop with all of the possibilities. I decided to take a compact system camera consisting of the Fujifilm X-Pro1 and X100 (and lenses) which worked out remarkably well for me as it was compact, lightweight and gave me superb image quality. Depending on your photography skill and ultimate goal (for your images), you can use any camera you’d like. I saw people using iPhones right up to professional level DSLRs and all of them seemed happy to do so. The bottom line is get a camera you like using, learn how to use it properly and have fun shooting in China.

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Streetphotography with the X-E1 in China | Alain Mijngheer

Streetphotography with the X-E1 in China | Alain Mijngheer | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

This year I had the great pleasure of spending 3 weeks in China. Not sticking to one place, but travelling through this vast and beautiful country. As I wanted to travel light I opted for the Fuji X-E1 with the 18-55mm, backed-up by the Fuji X100s. Anyhow, I took a lot of pictures of the locals and here is a brief B&W selection. Some of them are shy, others are happy, some are young and some are old. Others are painfully poor...but does it mean it should not be recorded......

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Gong Xi Fa Chai - Happy Chinese New Year! | Matt Brandon

Gong Xi Fa Chai - Happy Chinese New Year! | Matt Brandon | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


It’s that time a year again when the red and yellow paper lanterns are hung with care all around South East Asia. It’s Chinese New Year. I have friends of the On Field Media Project visiting us and, as is customary, Alou and I have been showing them around the area. One of our favorite places to take visitors has been the Goddess of Mercy Temple. But it has been renovated and has lost all of it’s patina and much of it’s charm and feel. Now it is just another new, shiney temple. These days, if I show off a local temple, it is Kek Lok Si–reported to be the largest Buddhist temple in Southeast Asia1. It is full of the old and new. This time of year the temple staff is in the middle of preparation for their huge Chinese New Year event on Jan 27th. For those of you who are not familiar with Buddhism and Hinduism, the swastika2 you see below predates the Nazis of World War II by 3,000 years. It is a symbol of good luck.....

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The changing face of China - X100s workout | George Greenlee

The changing face of China - X100s workout | George Greenlee | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


I am back from Nanjing for about a week now and have been chasing my tail trying to catch up on things, so my apologies for the radio silence. I have had a fascination with China for many years and while I get to travel all over the world I have only been to China once before, and even then only for three days, so I was delighted to be able to spend nearly three weeks working in Nanjing, thats long enough to really get stuck in to some decent photography. Before leaving I had made tentative arrangements for a guide to be with me while I travelled the streets and took photographs. I was not concerned from a security perspective, it just I wanted local advice on where to go for the best photo opportunities, plus its too easy to get lost when you do not speak or read the language. Normally for a trip like this I would pack up a few Nikon bodies, lenses, flash and a tripod, enough to cater for all eventualities, and then leave most of them in the hotel safe. This time I was determined to travel light and packed only my FujiFilm X100s, X-Pro1 with the 14mm and 60mm lenses and a tiny desktop tripod. It all fitted into my computer bag along with a Mac and a Surface RT. I was ready for road as they say in Ireland. But plans change. The project we were working on required us to work through two weekends and so personal photography was restricted to a couple of hours each night.

Walking the streets at night I couldn’t fail to notice the rising influence of western culture in China. A stark contrast to my previous visit to Beijing. Huge, brightly lit, billboards above clothes shops depicted western men and women as fashion icons. Starbucks, McDonalds and KFC stores were everywhere and young people proudly carried Gucci, Prada and other named brand bags. Below that veneer it is still undeniably China, particularly off the main streets, however it is changing at an incredible rate...

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