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Fuji X-Pro1
Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100S/T - photographer, reviews, samples and more ...  | http://www.tomen.de
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SHARPENING X-TRANS FILES IN ADOBE LIGHTROOM | Pete Bridgwood

SHARPENING X-TRANS FILES IN ADOBE LIGHTROOM | Pete Bridgwood | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

Sharpening is one of the most taxing aspects of the digital process and consequently many photographers prefer to stick to safe and secure ways, either using presets, plug-ins, exporting to Photoshop or ultimately using JPEGs straight from camera. The X-Trans sensor produces wonderful JPEGs, and all the usual advice about always shooting in Raw doesn’t necessarily hold true anymore. There are now many professional photographers who happily shoot JPEG using X-Series cameras all the time and have no complaints. JPEGs are very convenient, but for a landscape photographer like me, interested in the creative process and using post-processing as part of the digital alchemy, Raw files are so much more versatile. Sharpening Raw files from the X-Trans processor can be challenging for those of us who have grown familiar with more traditional Bayer array sensors; they demand a different approach and even experienced photographers will find there is a learning curve......

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Sharpening and Finishing Fuji X-Trans Files in Photoshop and Lightroom | Thomas Fitzgerald

Sharpening and Finishing Fuji X-Trans Files in Photoshop and Lightroom | Thomas Fitzgerald | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


This is the long awaited final (for now) part of my series on Processing X-Trans files. In my ongoing quest to get the best from Fuji’s raw files, I’ve previously discussed the issue with Lightroom’s processing, some alternative ways of developing raw files using Iridient Developer and Photo Ninja. I’ve also offered some Lightroom sharpening presets that help mitigate the demosaicing issues a bit. Many of the comments I’ve received have been wondering if there’s a way to get close to the output of Iridient Developer or Photo Ninja using a combination of Lightroom and Photoshop. Surprisingly, the answer is almost. I’ve been working on this for a while now and I believe that by combining Lightroom and a little bit of Photoshop you can get close. The advantage of this is that you can get clean and organic looking results without having to learn a new piece of software, and by using the droplet as a plug-in approach I blogged about last week, you don’t even have to leave Lightroom.....

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Fuji X-Trans Sharpening Presets for Lightroom | Thomas Fitzgerald

Fuji X-Trans Sharpening Presets for Lightroom | Thomas Fitzgerald | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


If you’re an owner of one of Fuji’s X-Trans cameras and you use Lightroom, you are either perfectly happy with the way the software handles the raw files or mildly frustrated at the way the Lightroom doesn’t seem to quite achieve the full potential of the X-Trans sensor. Unfortunately this has become a charged issue for some people, which is unfortunate, because I think that has prevented this issue form being properly resolved. I’m not trying to be controversial here, I’m just trying to help people. So if you don’t have an issue, then great, you can stop reading now! On the other hand, if you are a bit frustrated then I share your pain, and hopefully this will help. There’s something odd about how Lightroom processes X-Trans files. Despite a previous fix for the issue of smearing it still exists, and while it is not too bad at default settings, the files are a little soft, and the patterning becomes very apparent when you sharpen the files. There is also some weird thing going on where high contrast edges have a halo around them almost like it was embossed. I think this is what is causing the weird pattern like smearing when you turn up the sharpening. The other odd thing that I’ve found is that if you turn the sharpening off in Lightroom all together, the images look much softer than they do in other software when you do the same thing and turn sharpening off. It’s not just an over all Lightroom thing either though, as raw files from other manufacturers don’t show as big a difference when sharpening is disabled.....

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Is the Fuji X-T1 the sharpest APS-C camera out there? | Imaging Resource

Is the Fuji X-T1 the sharpest APS-C camera out there? | Imaging Resource | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

The Fujifilm X-T1 has been far and away one of the most popular cameras on our site this year, and that's without a full review yet posted. With the retro ergonomics, the reported super-fast AF speeds and a supporting cast that includes an excellent lens line and a very useful portrait battery grip, this is no surprise. But anyone interested in a camera in this price range is going to want image quality first and foremost, and our lab test images and comparison tables are here to help you figure out if this model stands up to the competition across the ISO spectrum for sharpness, detail, color and noise levels. With that in mind we've just posted our Image Quality Comparison section as well as our Print Quality analysis for the Fujifilm X-T1. Here you can view lab test image crops beside several popular competitors in this price range including the Canon 70D, Fujifilm X-E2, Nikon D7100, Pentax K3 as well as the full frame Sony A7.........

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Updated X-Trans Sharpening Presets for Lightroom | Thomas Fitzgerald

Updated X-Trans Sharpening Presets for Lightroom | Thomas Fitzgerald | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it

A while ago I posted some sharpening presets for sharpening images taken with one of Fujifilm’s X Series of cameras in Lightroom. I was attempting to find a way to minimise some of Lightroom’s idiosyncrasies when it comes to X-Trans processing. They were well received and people seemed to like them. Since then I’ve kept working on it and I’ve been continuing my quest to get the best out of X-Trans files. While I’ve been focusing on using third party applications in recent blog posts, I’ve still been working behind the scenes on best practices if you’re just using Lightroom......

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Take control sharpening in Photoshop | Digital-Photography-School

Take control sharpening in Photoshop | Digital-Photography-School | Fuji X-Pro1 | Scoop.it


Most people who have experimented in Photoshop, especially those who shoot in raw, will have some experience of trying to sharpen an image. Sharpening increases the contrast between neighbouring pixels resulting in the visual effect of a crisper image. It is typically the last processing step that should be performed on an image and is often used to enhance already well-focussed images or in desperation to try and rescue elements of a photograph that weren’t captured in-focus when the shutter was pressed. There are numerous ways to sharpen images in Photoshop, so much so that there is a whole sub-menu of filters dedicated to sharpening, each offering a different amount of control and different levels of success. However, one of the most overlooked filters that can help you achieve better results with more control isn’t found in the Sharpen sub-menu, but is in fact found in the, usefully named, Filter -> Other menu: the high pass filter. I’ll take you through a step-by-step guide to using high pass filter and hopefully show you how simple and effective image sharpening can be.....

 

The benefit of using this method to sharpen your images is that the sharpening effect is applied in a non-destructive fashion, on a duplicate layer, with a very simple to understand parameter (in the Radius value) that controls the magnitude of the sharpening, as well as giving you the ability to fine tune the final effect using the Opacity slider.

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