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Fuji X RAW Files | Adriel Henderson

Fuji X RAW Files | Adriel Henderson | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it

Curious about how the Fuji X series camera actually stores in the RAW (RAF) file, and how Fuji's DR mode affects the RAW file, I decided to dig into the RAW file a bit to see what I could discover. My tests here were produced using my FujiFilm XE-1, but the results should be identical to the other Fuji X cameras including the X-Pro1, X100, and X100s. The measured values and histograms were produced using RawDigger....

An important observation here is that even though stops of light are logarithmic (one stop is a doubling of light) the CMOS sensor measure light in a linear fashion and the RAW file records those values in a linear value scale. The effect is that tones in the upper-most stop of light can be described by nearly 1500 different variations, whereas tones in the lowest measured stop of light can only be described by two possible values - on or off. Because there are so many variations in the upper stops of light they can be described as "creamy" with smooth transitions from one color to another, whereas colors deep in the shadows with few variations can be describe as "crunchy.".... 

 


Via Thomas Menk
David Knoble's insight:

excellent technical work. 

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Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses
Information about photography with the Fuji X-Pro1 and the XF Lenses.
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10 Awesome Professional Photographers Who Use Fuji X Cameras for Work | Heather Broster

10 Awesome Professional Photographers Who Use Fuji X Cameras for Work | Heather Broster | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it


In our first post entitled 13 Amazing Professional Photographers Who Use Mirrorless Cameras on the Job, we met a wide range of professional photographers who all have one thing in common: they use one of the Fuji X, Olympus OM-D or Sony NEX system for work. These photographers either made the decision to drop their DSLRs for good, or chose to use mirrorless cameras in tandem with their other high-grade cameras in the professional sphere. In this post, we’ve decided to specifically hone in on great professional photographers who use Fuji X series cameras for work. Why? Because they appear to make up the largest group of converts from DSLR to mirrorless – an intriguing fact as the Fuji X series is still relatively new, has a less-varied lens roadmap than Olympus and Sony, and certainly isn’t without its flaws in terms of speed and autofocus. So, where does the attraction lie when qualitatively speaking other mirrorless brands are just as good or even better? There is no doubt that the sweet retro rangefinder design of all its models has something to do with it. After all, photographers are primarily visual creatures! ......


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Thomas Menk's curator insight, October 9, 2013 8:58 AM

Thx Heather for sharing :-)

Heather Broster's comment, October 9, 2013 10:10 AM
You're welcome Thomas, glad you liked it. :)
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103 Things I’ve Learned About Street Photography

103 Things I’ve Learned About Street Photography | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it
NYC, 2013 This article was originally posted on Digital Photography School. Over the years, I have learned a lot of lessons about street photography.
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Havana Cuba with the Fuji X100s | Kevin Lloyd

Havana Cuba with the Fuji X100s | Kevin Lloyd | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it


Hola! Here I am again with another blog posting about my travels to a place I would call a street photography Mecca, Havana Cuba! This trip consisted of 10 days solo travel within Cuba comprising 2 in Varadero, 4 in Havana, 2 in Vinales, and finally 2 more in Havana. The birth of this trip came from the desire to do a Photography workshop in Cuba back in 2011. I signed up for a guide-led workshop which subsequently fell through due to too many attendants pulling out. A year later I was still wishing I could go, but timing and funds were making things difficult, so I decided to save money, and do it to fit my own schedule. At the beginning of 2013 I booked a return flight to Varadero for the 12th of April. Ten days alone in Cuba… I went 8 days without internet access of any kind. 10 days without talking to anyone I’d met before the 12th of April, but meeting new friends every day. 10 days of experiencing new culture, getting to grips with Spanish, and shooting pictures as much as I wanted. Yup this was a wonderful trip and a refreshing change! Whilst I feel the pictures I took could have been better with a knowledgeable guide, the experience gained was way better for going along. Cuba seemed very safe to me, and I look forward to going back again for more images and experience. Cuba is the biggest island in the Caribbean by quite a margin, and there’s lots more to see yet…


Via Thomas Menk
David Knoble's insight:

Nice film simulation choices and exposures.  Love the color and the light.

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Arnold Barr's curator insight, July 25, 2013 4:06 PM

Great images and information! it a place I would love to visit and photograph.

Kevin Lloyd's comment, July 25, 2013 10:22 PM
Thanks a lot guys, much appreciated
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More details about the new X-PRO1 and X-E1 firmware on July 23. | Fuji Rumors

More details about the new X-PRO1 and X-E1 firmware on July 23. | Fuji Rumors | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it
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The streets of Thamel, Kathmandu. - Memento | Stephan Geyer

The streets of Thamel, Kathmandu. - Memento | Stephan Geyer | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it


I've been very lazy/slow in processing photos from my trips, but I have decided it is time to get back to the basics. Early April this year, I decided to embark in one of my mountaineering trips, this time to climb Island Peak (6180m) in Nepal. I will be posting photos from the trek and from the summit push in the coming week, but in the meantime, I am posting some of my personal favourite shots of the streets of Thamel, the iconic neighbourhood of Kathmandu. All the photos were taken with my X-Pro1 and either my 35/1.4 or my 18/2.0 Fujinon lenses. The last time I went mountaineering, I took my 5D and 35L lenses - what a difference it makes, not to the extra weight of a DSLR! Anyway, enough of this and on to the photos. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did taking them.....


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Thomas Menk's curator insight, July 4, 2013 11:23 PM

Thx Stephan for your suggestion. Great shots!

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The best bags for Compact System Cameras ‹ roel.me

The best bags for Compact System Cameras ‹ roel.me | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it
The best bags for Compact System Cameras...

Via Kim Roberts
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Retrospective 7 is my favorite.

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The Fujinon XF 14mm review - the best Leica lens Fuji ever built ;) | HamburgCam

The Fujinon XF 14mm review - the best Leica lens Fuji ever built ;) | HamburgCam | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it

I have spent a few weeks with the new Fuji XF 14mm f2.8 R lens. I had heard good things about it, yet it was not love at first sight for me. And that is not to say that it is not a pretty lens. It is very attractive looking and the markings for the DOF indicator clearly separates it from the rest of the current Fujinon XF lens lineup. But the timing for getting the XF 14mm was a bit off for me. I had just finished some intense testing of the Samyang 8mm f2.8 fisheye and absolutely loved the 180° field of view and image quality. And my main lens for the X-Pro 1 has been the light and very compact XF 18mm lens for the past year. Compared to the XF 18mm the XF 14mm is big (41mm/1.6" vs. 58mm/2.28") and heavy (116g/0.26lb vs. 235g/0.52lb). Will I be using the XF 14mm enough to justify the purchase? After all it is currently the most expensive X-Mount lens made by Fuji. And in the end it is only 4mm wider than the XF 18mm and even one stop slower.

Anyway, I now had the lens in my hands and did what I always do when I get new gear – I attached it to the camera, emptied my camera bag and locked all other lenses and camera bodies into my closet. The best way to get familiar with new gear fast is to use it intensely and exclusively.

So I went out on my first stroll with the new lens. But when I stepped out of my door I felt an unfamiliar strong pull on my camera strap (which I lug across my shoulder like a messenger bag). Not only is the XF 14mm heavier, it also sticks out longer to change the weight balance a bit into the “uncomfortable” department. Additionally, I do not like the style of lenshood that the XF 14mm requires. The XF 18mm and 35mm lenses have small and unobtrusive square lens hoods. But this is the Tulip style lens hood that draws much more attention and makes the camera look bigger than it is – not good for a stealthy aspiring street photographer.....

After tons of photos in all different lighting situations I am nothing short of impressed. I hear a few complaints about the price of this lens. And at a MSRP of EUR 899,- / USD 899,- it does not generally appear to be a bargain for a Fujinon XF lens at first sight. But imagine you could buy a Leica 14mm f2.8 lens for this price – you would not think twice. And from my image quality point of view I would say that the XF 14mm is the most Leica like wide angle lens I have tried so far.
If you take a look at it from this point of view the lens is almost a bargain! :)

+ Great image quality, color and contrast
+ DOF scale on the lens
+ Handles flare well
+ Value for money!

o Normal wide angle vignetting
o 58mm filter thread vs. 52mm on XF18 and 35mm
o 1 f-stop slower than the XF 18mm lens

- Weight and size
- Bulky lens hood


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Travel Photography in Vietnam | Adam Riley

Travel Photography in Vietnam | Adam Riley | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it



Readers of my facebook page will be well aware that last month, Laura and I were travelling around Vietnam. The purpose of the trip wasn’t travel photography in Vietnam, but to explore and meet people from this fabulous country, eat some nice food, and drink some good cocktails. That is exactly what we did and along the way I tried to capture the spirit and essence of the country as best as I could through the viewfinder. I took along my Fuji XPro 1, and despite meeting the concrete from a decent height on two occasions, it performed admirably, and I thoroughly enjoyed not lugging around a large SLR and a selection of heavy lenses! Laura carried the Fuji x20 and I hope to blog some of her images soon, as I’ve had many requests for further images with this little camera since my review a few weeks ago.

 

Vietnam is a country featuring a multitude of very different landscapes and ways of living, making it a photographer’s dream in terms of capturing varied images within one trip. However each area had its own set of challenges when it came to shooting. We started our trip in the capital, Hanoi. It is the definition of ‘hustle and bustle’, with street sellers galore, and more scooters than you can imagine. Interesting photo opportunities are in abundance but the difficulty then lies in finding a ‘clean’ shot, some early morning starts were definitely required here! Conversely, the idyllic hill town of Bac Ha, which we reached via an interesting overnight train has a more simple way of life – buffalo’s are used to plough the fields, and double up as commuter vehicles for the kids! Here, we were challenged by the weather as thick mist often covered the beautiful landscape. However the times when it lifted slightly added an extra layer of ‘rustic charm’ to the images captured. From here we hopped on a junk around the karst islands of Halong Bay, seeing some spectacular landscapes, before flying to the more commercialised Hoi An, which still manages to retains its charm and was one of our favourite places. A quick stop over in the westernised and modern Ho Chi Minh (formally Saigon), before a rain filled visit to the waterways and floating markets of the Mekong Delta. Finally we chilled out on the beaches around the stunning island of Phu Quoc – enjoying warm waters, sun and a few beers!

 

From the bustling cities, to the colourful hill tribes, we enjoyed; green tea with builders, crazy scooter rides, lost wedding rings (mine!), flying fish, pigs on bus roofs, frogs legs, beautiful sunrises and lots more. We visited as much of Vietnam as possible and had an amazing time. We met lots of lovely locals and equally lovely fellow travellers,  I can highly recommend a visit to this happy, colourful, friendly, interesting and lively place!

 

The common thread throughout the trip was the interaction between the locals, strong family bonds and close knit communities, working and socialising together. As I take a similar approach to my travel photography as that for my wedding photography, focussing on the people and telling a story with my images was my photographic aim. I took a fair few shots during the trip, and have narrowed it down to my favourite 50 that represent the country and its people…

 


Via Thomas Menk
David Knoble's insight:

Great reportage photography with the X-Pro1.

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Fujifilm and Panasonic collaborate on 'industry-leading' organic/CMOS sensor | Digital Photography Review

Fujifilm and Panasonic collaborate on 'industry-leading' organic/CMOS sensor | Digital Photography Review | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it

Fujifilm and Panasonic have announced the joint development of a sensor technology that combines a light-sensitive coating on top of a CMOS chip. The companies claim higher dynamic range and sensitivity than current CMOS sensors, along with the ability to receive light at steeper angles - making it easier to design cameras with wide-angle lenses and allowing lenses to be mounted nearer to the sensor. The announcement extends from the work Fujifilm has been conducting on organic (carbon-based) photo-senstive materials and combines it with CMOS underpinnings developed by Panasonic. The result is a chip that uses CMOS technology only for circuitry - with the organic layer taking over the role of converting light into electrons. Although the companies don't detail a timeline for production, the joint presentation made at the VLSI Technology show in Japan shows images of pixel designs on the 0.9μm and 3μm scales. The smaller pixel would allow the creation of a 20MP sensor for mobile phones, while the larger one would result in a 41MP APS-C sensor.....


Via Thomas Menk
David Knoble's insight:

Interesting ideas. 

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France and Paris with the Fuji X-E1 and the 35mm (warning image heavy)

France and Paris with the Fuji X-E1 and the 35mm (warning image heavy) | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it
So having made the brave decision to leave the normally welded to me Fuji X-100 at home and leave the Fujinon 18-55 at home hoping that this would push and bend my photographic skills in directions...

Via Simon Peckham
David Knoble's insight:

I like stone of the framing angles and use of lines.  The tones are magnificent, expected of the Fuji X cameras. 

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Fuji XF 14mm f/2.8 Review

David Knoble's insight:

The other XF lenses for X-Pro1 have been extremely sharp, IMO.  This is also essentially the last of the XF lenses to have the f/stop ring, which I think is also very important, again, IMO.  Using the thumb selector on the back of the camera for something like setting an f/stop means that manual mode is tough.  Anyone accustomed to a real camera lens will have difficulty making this transition and then switching between cameras.  In any event, I'm ordering this lens so that I have all four with f/stop rings.

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New Brown Fuji X-M1 images. Release in late July! | Fuji Rumors

New Brown Fuji X-M1 images. Release in late July! | Fuji Rumors | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it
Regardez si c'est pas beau ça http://t.co/D4cVu7ZPVw Cc @eiffair @olirip @todephotographe ;) et la taille http://t.co/I5CAJOlh6t
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Fujifilm X Pro 1 Predictions - No more pro Mirrorless Cameras?

Fujifilm X Pro 1 Predictions - No more pro Mirrorless Cameras? | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it

...

We won’t see a XPro 2. I don’t think ever. But we will see a XE2. I think that the hybrid finder on the Xpro1 is going to be the last Mirrorless camera made that has it. It’s what set the Xpro1 apart from pretty much the whole rest of the Mirrorless world but it’s going to be a feature of photo goodness past.

...


Via hpc
David Knoble's insight:

I read this when it first came out, but decided to re-scoop this to make sure we think about what we like in the X-Pro1 and be sure that the replacements carry these items.  IMHO, not having the OVF but retaining the EVF is fine.  I use Leica rangefinders where the OVF is well setup and allows me to frame very well even in close up situations.  However, one other item I like about the X-Pro1 is the lack of a pop-up flash.  The fuji flashes do very well and much better than a pop-up. While some say who cares, you don't have to use it, I suggest the following:  the X-Pro1 has a much better weather and dust seal without a pop-up flash.  The XE-1 (soon to be XE-2) has a pop-up flash.  Using that camera in dusty conditions or slight rain would have me worried about affecting the interior of the camera.  If we need an on-board flash, I'd rather see one built in the body like the X-100s.  Otherwise, I think Fuji has done an outstanding job of listening to critiques, providing often and well done firmware adjustments and improved control layouts.  I'd be happy with an XE-2 and no OVF as long as I don't have a pop-up flash in the way.  BTW, the Leica X2 and X Variou also have pop-up flashes and I dislike them for the same reasons.  My X100s and my X-Pro1 are great for outdoor shooting....

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New images of the XF 23mm f/1.4 leaked

New images of the XF 23mm f/1.4 leaked | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it
Over 1 month ago I've already posted the first image of the upcoming XF 23mm f/1.4 here. Now digicame-info was able to get more images about the next Fuji prime here (tranlsation). As we already kn...
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We've Updated Our Fujifilm X Pro 1 Coverage: Now an Editor's Choice Camera

We've Updated Our Fujifilm X Pro 1 Coverage: Now an Editor's Choice Camera | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it
Fujifilm X Pro 1 is now one of our favorite cameras.
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Faces of the Creek - Memento - Stephan Geyer Photography

Faces of the Creek - Memento - Stephan Geyer Photography | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it
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David Knoble's comment, July 6, 2013 4:37 AM
I love the expressions and uniqueness of culture I don't see in the US.
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True Macro With The X Pro 1 | Mark Hilliard

True Macro With The X Pro 1 | Mark Hilliard | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it

"Being Small in a Large World.."

 

A long blog post exploring the pros and cons of the Fuji X Pro 1 system for true macro photography using ALL of the Fuji system flashes! This includes several high quality image examples to demonstrate each of the system flash units:  EF-20, EF-X20 and the EF-42. 


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The Fujifilm X-Pro 1 : The Future of Professional Mirrorless Cameras?

The Fujifilm X-Pro 1 : The Future of Professional Mirrorless Cameras? | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it

"When you think of going to a National Park in the USA, what camera equipment comes to mind for your bag? Canon or Nikon’s top Full Frame SLRs perhaps? Gitzo tripods? Think Tank Photo bag? I say hell no! Why should you carry heavy cameras, heavy tripods in your heavy camera bag when traveling though one of the most beautiful places in the United States? Camera technology has advanced so far over the last few years and I think its about time for people to really start re-evaluating their gear..."


Via Kim Roberts
David Knoble's insight:

Great shots!  I love Yosemite and with my travel photography, I have to agree with much of hat is said here.

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Trinity College Library | Johnny Patience

Trinity College Library | Johnny Patience | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it

Trinity College, founded in 1592, is the sole constituent college of the University of Dublin in Ireland. It is one of the seven ancient universities of Britain and Ireland, as well as Ireland’s oldest university. The College’s Library is the largest library in Ireland. The main chamber of the old library, the Long Room which you can see in the photographs, was built between 1712 and 1732 and houses the library’s oldest books. By the 1850′s the room needed to be expanded as the shelves were filled, and so the roof was raised to accommodate an upper gallery. My wife Rebecca and I had planned to visit this library for a long time, but were never able to make time for it when we went to Dublin. Last week we were finally able to go and take pictures at Trinity College. I shot my Hasselblad outside and then switched to the X-Pro1 inside the library. Rebecca shot this entirely on film with her Contax 645 and I am very excited to see her results as soon as we get the scans back. All the shots below were taken with the Fuji X-Pro1 and the Fujinon 35mm 1.4 lens.....


Via Thomas Menk
David Knoble's insight:

I love the black and white tones and use of light. 

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Fujifilm Firmware Updates to Bring Focus Peaking to X-E1, X-Pro1 - Popular Photography Magazine

Fujifilm Firmware Updates to Bring Focus Peaking to X-E1, X-Pro1 - Popular Photography Magazine | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it
Popular Photography Magazine Fujifilm Firmware Updates to Bring Focus Peaking to X-E1, X-Pro1 Popular Photography Magazine 2) 'Focus Peak Highlight' function for manual focusing The 'Focus Peak Highlight' function, which features on the X100S and...

Via Simon Peckham
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I, for one, am anxious about this as I use manual focus almost exclusively!

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Fuji X RAW Files | Adriel Henderson

Fuji X RAW Files | Adriel Henderson | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it

Curious about how the Fuji X series camera actually stores in the RAW (RAF) file, and how Fuji's DR mode affects the RAW file, I decided to dig into the RAW file a bit to see what I could discover. My tests here were produced using my FujiFilm XE-1, but the results should be identical to the other Fuji X cameras including the X-Pro1, X100, and X100s. The measured values and histograms were produced using RawDigger....

An important observation here is that even though stops of light are logarithmic (one stop is a doubling of light) the CMOS sensor measure light in a linear fashion and the RAW file records those values in a linear value scale. The effect is that tones in the upper-most stop of light can be described by nearly 1500 different variations, whereas tones in the lowest measured stop of light can only be described by two possible values - on or off. Because there are so many variations in the upper stops of light they can be described as "creamy" with smooth transitions from one color to another, whereas colors deep in the shadows with few variations can be describe as "crunchy.".... 

 


Via Thomas Menk
David Knoble's insight:

excellent technical work. 

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France and Paris with the Fuji X-E1 and the 35mm (warning image heavy)

France and Paris with the Fuji X-E1 and the 35mm (warning image heavy) | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it

So having made the brave decision to leave the normally welded to me Fuji X-100 at home and leave the Fujinon 18-55 at home hoping that this would push and bend my photographic skills in directions I have not taken much before, I packed only the...


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Fuji X-Pro 1 and the Voigtlander Nokton 50mm f/1.5 by Jim Gamblin ...

Fuji X-Pro 1 and the Voigtlander Nokton 50mm f/1.5 by Jim Gamblin ... | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it
Fuji X-Pro 1 and the Voigtlander Nokton 50mm f/1.5 by Jim Gamblin (From Steve: The brand new redesigned Nokton 1.5 in M mount will be released in 2-4.
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I am anxious to try this lens.

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Taking Photos in “The City of Light” – The Leica M9 and Fuji XPro-1 in Paris | Ashwin Rao on STEVE HUFF Blog

Taking Photos in “The City of Light” – The Leica M9 and Fuji XPro-1 in Paris | Ashwin Rao on STEVE HUFF Blog | Fuji X-Pro1 and XF Lenses | Scoop.it


I wanted to take the time to celebrate my longstanding favorite camera, the Leica M9, and one of my new favorites, the Fuji XPro-1, as amazing photographic tools by which to grow my photographic skills. I used both cameras extensively during my recent visit to Paris this past July, and the exercise of photographing this city for a week validated my vision for the city by capturing it in the way that I saw it. We currently live in a golden age of photography, where cameras are truly fantastic tools for creative expressionism. Every camera will have strengths and weaknesses, and one should choose a camera that suits their needs and style, and go out and make images. For some, it’s the iPhone that suits their needs the best. For others, tech cameras with medium format backs are necessary to capture the required image. For me, over the past 6 years, the digital rangefinder has been the camera that suited my needs, and in particular, the Leica M9 was an digital realization of the ideal rangefinder camera. Remember that while the M10 may soon replace the M9 at the top of Leica’s supply and production food chain, the Leica M9 remains and will continue to be a fantastic tool for those who love rangefinder photography. Similarly, the Fuji XPro-1 is a fantastic option for people liking cameras in a smaller form factor, with rangefinder styling. It is far from perfect, with quirky autofocus being its primary issue, but the images acquired from its innovative sensor have the potential to wow both the photographer and his or her audience. Let me talk about my experience using these cameras, while walking the streets of Paris….

 


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